Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Optimising Your Content for Findability
Optimising Your Content for Findability
Optimising Your Content for Findability
Optimising Your Content for Findability
Optimising Your Content for Findability
Optimising Your Content for Findability
Optimising Your Content for Findability
Optimising Your Content for Findability
Optimising Your Content for Findability
Optimising Your Content for Findability
Optimising Your Content for Findability
Optimising Your Content for Findability
Optimising Your Content for Findability
Optimising Your Content for Findability
Optimising Your Content for Findability
Optimising Your Content for Findability
Optimising Your Content for Findability
Optimising Your Content for Findability
Optimising Your Content for Findability
Optimising Your Content for Findability
Optimising Your Content for Findability
Optimising Your Content for Findability
Optimising Your Content for Findability
Optimising Your Content for Findability
Optimising Your Content for Findability
Optimising Your Content for Findability
Optimising Your Content for Findability
Optimising Your Content for Findability
Optimising Your Content for Findability
Optimising Your Content for Findability
Optimising Your Content for Findability
Optimising Your Content for Findability
Optimising Your Content for Findability
Optimising Your Content for Findability
Optimising Your Content for Findability
Optimising Your Content for Findability
Optimising Your Content for Findability
Optimising Your Content for Findability
Optimising Your Content for Findability
Optimising Your Content for Findability
Optimising Your Content for Findability
Optimising Your Content for Findability
Optimising Your Content for Findability
Optimising Your Content for Findability
Optimising Your Content for Findability
Optimising Your Content for Findability
Optimising Your Content for Findability
Optimising Your Content for Findability
Optimising Your Content for Findability
Optimising Your Content for Findability
Optimising Your Content for Findability
Optimising Your Content for Findability
Optimising Your Content for Findability
Optimising Your Content for Findability
Optimising Your Content for Findability
Optimising Your Content for Findability
Optimising Your Content for Findability
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Optimising Your Content for Findability

2,516

Published on

Tutorial by Kristian Norling on 6 November, at J. Boye 2012 in Aarhus Denmark.

Tutorial by Kristian Norling on 6 November, at J. Boye 2012 in Aarhus Denmark.

Published in: Technology
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
2,516
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
5
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
25
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. OPTIMISING YOUR CONTENT FOR FINDABILITY Kristian Norling, JBoye 2012, 6 November, Aarhus, Denmark
  • 2. #jboye12@kristiannorling @!ndwise
  • 3. Introduction• Who is here?• Your expectations?• Kristian?• 3 hours• One 20 minute break ≈ 10.20• Lifetime answer Guarantee on this class
  • 4. THE ENTERPRISE SEARCH AND FINDABILITY SURVEY/REPORT SIGN-UP & DOWNLOAD 2012 REPORT
  • 5. Description As the amount of content continues to increase, new approaches are required to provide good user experiences. Findability has been introduced as a new term among content strategists and information architects and is most easily explained as : “A state where all information is !ndable and an approach to reaching that state.” Search technology is readily used to make information !ndable, but as many have realized technology alone is unfortunately not enough. To achieve !ndability additional activities across several important dimensions such as business, user, information and organisation are needed.
  • 6. Description Search engine optimisation is one aspect of !ndability and many of the principles from SEO works in a intranet or website search context. Getting !ndability to work well for your website or intranet is a di#cult task, that needs continuous work. In this tutorial you will take a deep dive into the many aspects of !ndability, with some good practices on how to improve !ndability.
  • 7. Brief Outline We will start some very brief theory and then use real examples and also talk about what organisations that are most satis!ed with their !ndability do. Topics •Enterprise Search Engines vs Web Search •Governance •Organisation •User involvement •Optimise Content for !ndability •Metadata •Search Analytics
  • 8. IS IT EASY TO FIND THE RIGHT INFORMATION WITHIN YOUR ORGANISATION TODAY?Source: The Enterprise Search and Findability Report 2012
  • 9. EUROPE 77%MODERATELY/VERY HARD
  • 10. WHAT ARE THE OBSTACLES TO FINDING THE RIGHT INFORMATION?
  • 11. EUROPE64.2% POOR SEARCH FUNCTIONALITY47.7% LACK OF ADEQUATE TAGS48.6% INCONSISTENCY IN HOW WE TAG CONTENT47.7% DONT KNOW WHERE TO LOOK
  • 12. DATE -THE SILVER BULLET OF ENTERPRISE SEARCH Source: IntranetFocus
  • 13. ENTERPRISE SEARCH:UN-COOL AND MISSION CRITICAL Source: Julie Hunt
  • 14. History of SearchIn Academia search is called InformationRetrieval.It is an old discipline, dating backthousands of years...Basic concepts in Information Retrieval:Recall and Precision, more later...
  • 15. Wikipedia De!nition“Enterprise search is the practice ofmaking content from multipleenterprise-type sources, such asdatabases and intranets, searchable to ade"ned audience.”http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enterprise_search
  • 16. The Concept of Enterprise Search: Precision In the !eld of information retrieval, precision is the fraction of retrieved documents that are relevant to the search. Precision takes all retrieved documents into account, but it can also be evaluated at a given cut-o" rank, considering only the topmost results returned by the system. This measure is called precision at n or P@n. Source: Wikipedia
  • 17. The Concept of Enterprise Search: Recall Recall in information retrieval is the fraction of the documents that are relevant to the query that are successfully retrieved. For example for text search on a set of documents recall is the number of correct results divided by the number of results that should have been returned. Source: Wikipedia
  • 18. Precision and Recall R number of M number of N number of retrieved documents relevant documents retrieved documents that are also relevant
  • 19. Precision and RecallRecall = R / M =Number of retrieved documents that arealso relevant / Total number of relevantdocuments.Precision = R / N =Number of retrieved documents that arealso relevant / Total number of retrieveddocuments.
  • 20. Relevance...enterprises typically have to use other query-independent factors, such as a documents recency orpopularity, along with query-dependent factorstraditionally associated with information retrievalalgorithms. Also, the rich functionality of enterprisesearch UIs, such as clustering and faceting, diminishreliance on ranking as the means to direct the usersattention. Source: Wikipedia
  • 21. PageRank
  • 22. Web/Consumer Data vs Enterprise Data “Enterprise data simply isn’t like web or consumer data – it’s characterised by rarity and unconnectedness rather than popularity and context.” Charlie Hull, Flax Blog
  • 23. RelevanceWe do not have PageRank......but we have the bene"t of social!CMSWire: Social Reconnects Enterprise SearchEmails, People Catalogues, Connections,Tagging, Sharing etc.
  • 24. The Concept of Enterprise Search
  • 25. Organisation• Resources!IntranetFocus: Enterprise Search Team Management• Work with all Stakeholders = The wholeorganisation•De!ne processes, roles and routines togovern the solution• Help publishers get started by creatingprocesses for better !ndability• Create easy to use administration interfaces
  • 26. Survey Results of Budget and Organisation Amongst the organisations that are very satis!ed with their search, they have a (larger) budget, more resources and systematically work with analysing search. As many as 45% of the respondents have no separate budget for search, but 20% have had a budget for 3 years or more. In the group with no budget 56% are very or mostly dissatis!ed with their current search. The dissatisfaction with search drops to 30% for those organisations with a dedicated budget for search. In the very satis!ed (67%) and mostly satis!ed (59%) groups a large majority has a budget. And 71% of the organisations without a strategy also have no budget.
  • 27. What Does the Organisations Do That LeadsFindability? • In the Very Satis!ed (VS) with their current search group, the number of Full Time Equivalents (FTE) is 1-2 or more. • 67% of VS and 71% of the mostly satis!ed groups do search analytics • 50% do user testing regularly in the very satis!ed group • 83% (VS) have a person or group that is responsible for analysing user behaviour and to make sure that search supports the business needs • 84% have feedback functionality in the VS group • 67% of VS have a taxonomy in place and 83% have a metadata standard.
  • 28. Search Team• Search Manager• Search Technology Manager• Information Specialist• Search Analytics Manager• Search Support ManagerBy Martin White, IntranetFocus
  • 29. Organisation• Not a project!• Time and Money important• Measure, KPIs/Search AnalyticsCIO.com: How to Evaluate Enterprise SearchFindability Blog: Building a Business Case for EnterpriseSearch
  • 30. CONTENT STRATEGY @jcolman: How to Build SEO into Content Strategy
  • 31. Governance• Information Quality, with KPI• Metadata Quality, with KPI• Information Lifecycle Management - Time to live for di$erent content types - Archive, delete or keep?• SimCorp example• Search Analytics on regular basis
  • 32. User Involvement• Get to know your users and their needs• Make sure your solution is easy to use• Perform continuous usability evaluations, likeusage tests and expert evaluations• Make sure users !nd what they are looking for• Enable feedback loops for complaints,feedback and praise• Examples: Nordea, VGR and many more
  • 33. Information• Good Data/Information hygiene• Crap in = Crap out• Metadata is very important!Presentation: Taxonomy and Metadata demysti!edVideo: TetraPak exampleVideo: VGR example
  • 34. Information• Clean up and archive or delete outdated/unrelevant information• Ensure good quality of information byadding structured and suitable metadata• Information Architecture and taxonomiesEarly & Associates: 10 Common Mistakes WhenDeveloping Taxonomies• TaggingPresentation: Social Tagging, Folksonomies ControlledVocabularies
  • 35. METADATA
  • 36. •List yeraze
  • 37. svenwerk
  • 38. DEWEY DECIMAL CLASSIFICATION
  • 39. KristianNorling
  • 40. Author: Douglas CouplandTitle: Generation APublisher: Windmill BooksYear: 2009Printed by: CPI Cox & WymanFirst published: 2004
  • 41. MetadataSemantic
  • 42. ESEO: Actionable activities• Metadata• TitlesExample: Ernst & YoungVery Important• Content Quality• Information Life Cycle Management
  • 43. Ways to add metadata• Manually - Editors• Automatic - Software• Semi-automatic - Software + Editors• Tagging - Users (+Software)VGR Example: How to add metadataThomas Vander Wal:Integrating Folksonomies With Traditional Metadata
  • 44. Search Analytics•Bene"t of Search Analytics•What metrics are interesting?•Actions to take based on search analytics•Do’s and don’ts
  • 45. SEARCH ANALYTICSGIVES USER INTENT
  • 46. Search AnalyticsImportant, delivers actionable to-dos quickly• 0-results• Top Terms Searched forVideo: Search Analytics in Practice
  • 47. Actions to take• Know what information is “most wanted” and work with that• Promote information when it is in demand• Are search queries seasonal?• Find synonyms
  • 48. Do...Fix 0-results...Check common terms...Cluster synonyms...Use Key Matches / Best Bets / Sponsored Links
  • 49. A FEW HOURSEVERY MONTH, CAN DELIVERGREAT RESULTS!
  • 50. Do - bonus...Check user behaviour?...Research in what context?...Look at trending/temporal terms
  • 51. Do not...Forget to work with your content...Forget metadata...Only use search analytics - combine with web analytics
  • 52. Fantastic bookSEARCH ANALYTICS FOR YOUR SITEConversations with Your Customers by LOUIS ROSENFELD @louisrosenfeld
  • 53. Summary• Involve the users (and stakeholders!)• Allow user input (forms)• Training for editors and publishers• Set up simple guidelines (E&Y)• Lifecycle Manage Information• Do Search Analytics• Measure and follow-up
  • 54. Bonus (SharePoint) tip 1 Create an information architecture or at least a content model, answering the questions; What goes were, what information are related and how should it be possibly to access the information?   Ensure that all information is mapped in this manner and if new types of information arise that doesnt !t the model, revise and restructure (not refactor). Make sure that information architecture is not optional but mandatory.   
  • 55. Bonus (SharePoint) tip 2 The way forward in a more complex information landscape is metadata and search. Use the term store to create taxonomies and metadata structures, add as much needed information as possible and apply them to the information through the content types in SP, to all the information. Applied term store information can be directly accessed via search as facets which is a very powerful tool to quickly navigate to the correct information. The term store also gives you other possibilities to create other ways to navigate that are not based on the classical usually more functionally or organisationally based navigation e.g. Via product, customer or projects. 
  • 56. Bonus (SharePoint) tip 3 Socialise your content and make sure that user input counts towards search relevance and the overall information architecture. User input can be manifested as explicit or implicit. Explicit as likes or comment on the information, implicit via search logs. The explicit input is quite straight forward but might need a critical mass to become relevant e.g. More likes = higher relevance. Implicit via search logs needs more analysis but will give more leverage.
  • 57. Kristian Norlingkristian.norling@!ndwise.com @kristiannorling @!ndwise !ndwise.com Findability Blog Slideshare LinkedIn Vimeo Newsroom

×