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KB_Home_A_Rrev

  1. 1. KB HOME 2001 ANNUAL REPORT EVERYWHERE
  2. 2. KB HOME 2001 ANNUAL REPORT ALL THE TIME
  3. 3. Getting attention. Making an impact. Cultivating trust, loyalty and enduring relationships. As the premier U.S. homebuilder serving first-time and first-move-up buyers, KB Home forges meaningful connections with consumers. We’re in their sights and on their minds wherever they go, whenever they think of home. By offering more choices and more home for the dollar, we earn the privilege of serving tens of thousands of families each year. Persistent, consistent and absolutely, indisputably there — that’s KB Home.
  4. 4. FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS YEARS ENDED NOVEMBER 30, 2001 2000 1999 1998 1997 IN THOUSANDS, EXCEPT PER SHARE AND UNIT AMOUNTS NET ORDERS, DELIVERIES AND BACKLOG (NUMBER OF HOMES) NET ORDERS 24,935 24,275 23,094 16,781 12,489 DELIVERIES 24,868 22,847 22,460 15,213 11,443 UNIT BACKLOG 11,225 10,767 8,777 6,943 4,214 REVENUES AND INCOME REVENUES $ 4,574,184 $ 3,930,858 $ 3,836,295 $ 2,449,362 $ 1,878,723 OPERATING INCOME 386,087 312,441 276,571 170,085 116,259 PRETAX INCOME 324,517 297,660 226,869 146,567 91,030 NET INCOME 214,217 209,960 147,469 95,267 58,230 BASIC EARNINGS PER SHARE 5.72 5.39 3.16 2.41 1.50 DILUTED EARNINGS PER SHARE 5.50 5.24 3.08 2.32 1.45 ASSETS, DEBT AND EQUITY TOTAL ASSETS $ 3,692,866 $ 2,828,921 $ 2,664,235 $ 1,860,204 $ 1,418,991 MORTGAGES AND NOTES PAYABLE 1,683,650 1,373,274 1,191,090 769,259 697,697 MANDATORILY REDEEMABLE PREFERRED SECURITIES 189,750 189,750 189,750 STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY 1,092,481 654,759 676,583 474,511 383,056 RETURN ON AVERAGE STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY 24.5% 25.6% 25.6% 22.2% 16.1%
  5. 5. 40% CAGR* $5.50 $6.00 $5.24 $5.00 $4.00 $3.08 $3.00 $2.32 $2.00 $1.45 $1.00 97 98 99 00 01 DILUTED EARNINGS PER SHARE KBH * Compound annual growth rate 97-01 02 03
  6. 6. STREET SIGNS, CNBC / 11:30 am DEAR SHAREHOLDERS Companies coming off a great year often like to say, “The numbers tell the story,” while companies coming off a tough year typically tell investors, “There’s more to the story than just numbers.” We at KB Home are the exception. Our record-breaking numbers are just the beginning. There’s no way to describe our success in 2001 without offering the broader context of the people, events and strategies that combined to produce our outstanding results. First, the numbers: • For the year, unit deliveries increased 9% over those of fiscal 2000, to a record 24,868 units. • Revenues rose 16% to $4.57 billion, a company record. • Each of our geographic regions reported gains in unit delivery volume as net income advanced to a record $214.2 million. • Earnings per share rose to $5.50, another record. • At year’s end, KB Home recorded a backlog of 11,225 units representing future revenues of $1.91 billion.
  7. 7. BLOOMBERG / 11:47 am Also in 2001, KB Home expanded its operations into the fast-growing Jacksonville, Florida and Laredo, Texas markets. These are telling examples of how KB Home intends to enhance shareholder value and build a nationally respected brand through intelligent growth that works on paper and in practice. THE NEW MODEL HOMEBUILDER Given the unsettled U.S. economy and wavering consumer confidence, our 2001 performance — and our industry’s resilience — caught many industry observers off guard. Conventional wisdom, after all, has long held that homebuilding is a speculative, risk-heavy, cyclical pursuit whose fortunes are tied too closely to the rise and fall of interest rates. But the problem with conventional wisdom is that it tends to trail reality by several long paces. Until five or six years ago, many homebuilders would build entire communities and assume the costs of holding and maintaining model homes and production inventory until they sold. But following the recession of the early 1990s, we developed a system for pre-selling homes — originally known as “KB2000” and now called “KBnxt” — with a view to minimizing our risk exposure, enhancing the predictability and sustainability of our results, and offering consumers more and better choices. Today, after selecting a floorplan and homesite that meet their needs, buyers visit our KB Home Studios to customize everything from flooring to appliances to lighting fixtures, rolling the cost of those options into their mortgages. KBnxt ensures that construction of each home unfolds with “one-home-at-a-time” care. It’s also proof that what’s good for homebuyers is also good for homebuilders. KBH 04 05
  8. 8. SQUAWK BOX, CNBC / 8:05 am LOCATION, LOCATION, LOCATION A solid business model is just one essential for a homebuilder. If you’re not in the right places, process hardly matters. Building as we do in 12 of the 15 cities ranked by Forbes magazine as the best places in America to live and work, we know we’re ideally situated. And by specializing in affordably priced homes for first-time and first-move- up buyers, we know we’re a perfect fit for the young populations of growing western, southwestern and southeastern markets. Surveys repeatedly reveal that the goal of homeownership is common to nearly all American consumers. That fact, along with a continued shortage of housing nationwide, indicates that the opportunities before us are enormous, and growing all the time. EVERYWHERE, ALL THE TIME The myriad of ways in which we capitalize on those opportunities is what distinguishes KB Home from competitors and defines our corporate culture. Our strong bottom-line has everything to do with the fact that in 2001, KB Home seemed to be everywhere, all the time. January saw us on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange, ringing the opening bell to mark the occasion of our company name change. In one sense, the switch to “KB Home” was a practical decision – we simply formalized the shorthand by which we’ve been known for years. But in another sense, the change represented an important step in our evolution into a fully consumer-focused organization with strong brand recognition. In that way, the change drove the rest of our year, which was one of near-breathless intensity, marked by smart, aggressive marketing that significantly heightened our company’s profile among consumers and the financial community. KB Home’s presence on billboards, up in lights, on the airwaves, and in the press kept KBH 06 07
  9. 9. us on the minds of prospective homebuyers in all our markets throughout the year. At KB Home, consumer outreach is a preoccupation that borders on obsession, and it begins with ongoing, in-depth research on first-time buyers to learn what motivates them. From there, we devise an exhaustive range of creative strategies and tactics that hit people where they live. This past year, as interest rates dropped to record low levels, we continued to find unusual, eye-catching ways to educate consumers about the ease and affordability of homeownership. ON THE GROUND, IN THE AIR, “IN-YOUR-FACE” In every medium, we create a message that hits home with consumers. Our overarching goal is to be everywhere people are. On any given weekend, that may mean hosting morning donuts and coffee or an afternoon cookout at our communities with high- profile partners such as Krispy Kreme and In-N-Out Burger. At the same time, just a few miles away, we may co-sponsor a county fair or be on hand at major family attractions: San Antonio’s SeaWorld, a San Diego Padres game or a block party in Phoenix. High-visibility promotions are just the beginning. KB Home billboards dot the highways and streets near our neighborhoods, just as our flyers and doorhangers are fixtures at apartment complexes and mall parking lots. This past year, we beefed up our traditional media and promotional menu with an e-mail marketing campaign and a full half-hour infomercial in both English and Spanish that drove waves of consumer traffic to our communities. Our 888-KB-HOMES information line continued to provide a ready point-of-contact for consumers eager to prequalify for a mortgage or get answers to questions about monthly payments. And for the uninitiated, our KB Homebuyers Club serves as an indispensable resource for prospective homebuyers who’ve never had a reason to concern themselves with the difference between fixed- and variable-rate
  10. 10. STREET SWEEP, CNNfn / 3:20 pm mortgages. As those curious consumers on the sidelines make the transition to active shoppers, we’ve found that they tend to visit our communities first. The business- school term for this kind of assault-the-senses approach is “guerilla marketing,” and while it’s the norm for companies that sell cola, cars or candy bars, it’s largely unheard of in homebuilding. We at KB Home are changing all that. Our in-house advertising agency develops an arsenal of highly targeted campaigns each year which, in addition to touting the benefits of homeownership, also boosts people’s awareness of our brand. While cultivating brand loyalty is harder for a homebuilder than a packaged goods manufacturer, we are proving it can be done. A CULTURE OF CUSTOMER SATISFACTION This “can-do” spirit is at the heart of KB Home’s culture — it’s the essence of who we are. Our 3,700 employees represent a wide variety of different backgrounds and areas of expertise; what they have in common are high expectations and grand ambitions, coupled with an unyielding commitment to customer satisfaction. More than any other single factor, that commitment will ensure KB Home’s competitive edge as we move forward. Simply put, everyone in our organization understands that success depends on our ability to satisfy every single homebuyer. Chief Operating Officer Jeff Mezger has personally overseen companywide efforts aimed at addressing any and all issues with the power to affect a buyer’s experience with KB Home, and this work has more than paid off: In 2001, comprehensive data gleaned through sophisticated tracking processes revealed the highest customer-satisfaction ratings in our company’s history. It would be an understatement to say this achievement is an enormous source of pride to all of us at KB Home.
  11. 11. FOX NEWS LIVE / 11:40 am PEAK PERFORMANCE, BUILT ON A FOUNDATION OF TRUST World events of the past year resulted in the core values of home, family and community returning to the forefront of American public life. The lasting impact is a pointed reminder to all homebuilders of the responsibility we bear: We at KB Home are keenly aware that whenever buyers invest hard-earned dollars in their new homes, they are effectively entrusting us with nothing less than their hopes for the future. Based on our performance throughout fiscal 2001, shareholders should know I have absolute confidence that our company is up to the challenge. For us, four decades of experience in building and selling new homes represents just the beginning. We look to the possibilities of the coming year with anticipation and a sense of genuine excitement. SINCERELY, BRUCE KARATZ, CHAIRMAN AND CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER FEBRUARY 12, 2002
  12. 12. WEST PACIFIC / PT MOUNTAIN / MT
  13. 13. CENTRAL / CT EASTERN / ET EAST
  14. 14. EVERYWHERE, ALL THE TIME “SPACIOUS HOMES, THOUSANDS OF CHOICES, GREAT LOCATIONS. ALL AT A PRICE YOU CAN AFFORD.” THAT’S THE HARDCORE MESSAGE KB HOME GOES TO EXTREMES TO COMMUNICATE. WHETHER THEY’RE TUNED IN, LOGGED ON, OR OUT AND ABOUT, WE FIND MEMORABLE, CREATIVE WAYS TO GET HOMEBUYERS’ ATTENTION.
  15. 15. EVERYWHERE, ALL THE TIME / 11:43 am CALIFORNIA KBH 12 13
  16. 16. EVERYWHERE, ALL THE TIME / 2:57 pm NEVADA KBH 14 15
  17. 17. WHERE THE CUSTOMER REALLY IS KING JUST BECAUSE A HOME IS THE BIGGEST PURCHASE PEOPLE MAKE DOESN’T MEAN IT HAS TO BE THE TOUGHEST. ONE-STOP MORTGAGE SHOPPING THROUGH KB HOME MORTGAGE SIMPLIFIES THE LOAN PROCESS. BUYERS CUSTOMIZE EVERYTHING FROM COUNTERTOPS TO WINDOW COVERINGS AT KB HOME STUDIOS. AND OUR KB HOMEBUYERS CLUB GIVES HOUSEHUNTERS THE ADVICE AND ASSISTANCE THEY NEED TO REALIZE THE DREAM OF OWNERSHIP.
  18. 18. TEAMING UP WITH CHAMPIONS KB HOME MADE HEADLINES IN 2001 WITH MARQUEE MARKETING PARTNERSHIPS THAT HIT CONSUMERS RIGHT WHERE THEY LIVE. JOINING FORCES WITH THE WORLD CHAMPION ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS AND OTHER WORLD-CLASS BRANDS AND ORGANIZATIONS BOOSTED TRAFFIC AND SALES AT OUR COMMUNITIES THROUGHOUT THE YEAR.
  19. 19. EVERYWHERE, ALL THE TIME / 9:28 am ARIZONA KBH 16 17
  20. 20. EVERYWHERE, ALL THE TIME / 4:12 pm NEW MEXICO KBH 18 19
  21. 21. INTELLIGENCE BY THE TANKFUL EACH YEAR, TO BE SURE WE’RE BUILDING THE HOMES PEOPLE WANT, KB HOME SURVEYS BUYERS’ NEEDS, PREFERENCES, AND MOTIVATIONS. WE NEED TO KNOW: WHERE EXACTLY, DO THEY WANT TO LIVE? IS A FIREPLACE ESSENTIAL? WOULD THEY TRADE A SMALLER YARD FOR MORE SQUARE FOOTAGE? THE EFFORT HELPS DETERMINE WHERE WE BUILD, WHICH FEATURES WE INCLUDE IN LOCAL MODELS, AND MORE.
  22. 22. RUGGED, ALL-TERRAIN PRODUCTS, SMOOTH-SAILING SERVICE FROM THE MOUNTAINS TO THE PRAIRIES, THE ROAD TO A HOMEBUYER’S UNEQUIVOCAL SATISFACTION IS PAVED WITH QUALITY CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS, A 10-YEAR LIMITED WARRANTY AND KB HOME’S HANDS-ON, DETAIL-ORIENTED SUPERIN- TENDENTS AND SALES AGENTS.
  23. 23. EVERYWHERE, ALL THE TIME / 1:36 pm COLORADO KBH 20 21
  24. 24. EVERYWHERE, ALL THE TIME / 12:47 pm TEXAS KBH 22 23
  25. 25. ON A ROLL, WITH A NEW NAME WHAT’S IN A NAME? FOR STARTERS, EVERY IMPRESSION, EVERY ASSOCIATION AND EVERY EXPERIENCE PEOPLE HAVE WITH THAT ORGANIZATION. WITH SO MUCH AT STAKE, A NAME HAS TO BE CONCISE, MEMORABLE AND TRUE TO THE COMPANY’S SPIRIT AND MISSION. RESEARCH REVEALED THAT THE WORLD ALREADY CALLED OUR COMPANY “KB HOME,” SO WE MADE IT OFFICIAL IN 2001.
  26. 26. WHERE IT’S AT, WHEN IT COUNTS IN 2001, KB HOME EXTENDED ITS OPERATIONS TO THE EAST COAST WITH A STRATEGIC ACQUISITION IN JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA, AND BROADENED ITS REACH WITH EXPANSION INTO THE LAREDO, TEXAS, MARKET. THE MOVES WERE CONSISTENT WITH OUR STRATEGY OF BUILDING A COMMANDING PRESENCE IN FAST-GROWING MARKETS—ONE HOME, AND ONE FAMILY, AT A TIME.
  27. 27. EVERYWHERE, ALL THE TIME / 10:03 am FLORIDA KBH 24 25
  28. 28. 21% CAGR* 34% CAGR* 24,868 $494 22,847 22,460 $500 25,000 $434 $400 20,000 $359 15,213 $300 15,000 11,443 $217 10,000 $200 $154 5,000 $100 0 $0 97 98 99 00 01 97 98 99 00 01 EBITDA UNIT DELIVERIES (IN MILLIONS) * Compound annual growth rate 97-01
  29. 29. 30% CAGR* 28% CAGR* 11,225 $1,092 $1,200 12,000 10,767 10,000 $1,000 8,777 8,000 $800 6,943 $677 $655 6,000 $600 $475 4,214 $383 4,000 $400 $200 2,000 97 98 99 00 01 97 98 99 00 01 STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY UNIT BACKLOG (IN MILLIONS) KBH * Compound annual growth rate 97-01 28 29
  30. 30. 7.8% 21% 8% 7.5% 20.1% 6.9% 19.7% 20% 7% 19.3% 19.2% 6.2% 19% 6% 5.5% 18.2% 18% 5% 17% 4% 16% 3% 97 98 99 00 01 97 98 99 00 01 HOUSING CONSTRUCTION GROSS MARGIN OPERATING MARGIN KBH 30 31
  31. 31. 2001 CONSTRUCTION REVENUES 36% 22% WEST COAST SOUTHWEST 29% 13% CENTRAL FOREIGN $4,501,715,000
  32. 32. SELECTED FINANCIAL INFORMATION YEARS ENDED NOVEMBER 30, 2001 2000 1999 1998 1997 IN THOUSANDS, EXCEPT PER SHARE AMOUNTS CONSTRUCTION: Revenues $4,501,715 $3,870,488 $3,772,121 $2,402,966 $1,843,614 Operating income 352,316 288,609 259,107 148,672 101,751 Total assets 2,983,522 2,361,768 2,214,076 1,542,544 1,133,861 Mortgages and notes payable 1,088,615 987,980 813,424 529,846 496,869 MORTGAGE BANKING: Revenues $ 72,469 $ 60,370 $ 64,174 $ 46,396 $ 35,109 Operating income 33,771 23,832 17,464 21,413 14,508 Total assets 709,344 467,153 450,159 317,660 285,130 Notes payable 595,035 385,294 377,666 239,413 200,828 Collateralized mortgage obligations 22,359 29,928 36,219 49,264 60,058 CONSOLIDATED: Revenues $4,574,184 $3,930,858 $3,836,295 $2,449,362 $1,878,723 Operating income 386,087 312,441 276,571 170,085 116,259 Net income 214,217 209,960 147,469 95,267 58,230 Total assets 3,692,866 2,828,921 2,664,235 1,860,204 1,418,991 Mortgages and notes payable 1,683,650 1,373,274 1,191,090 769,259 697,697 Collateralized mortgage obligations 22,359 29,928 36,219 49,264 60,058 Mandatorily redeemable preferred securities (Feline Prides) 189,750 189,750 189,750 Stockholders’ equity 1,092,481 654,759 676,583 474,511 383,056 BASIC EARNINGS PER SHARE $ 5.72 $ 5.39 $ 3.16 $ 2.41 $ 1.50 DILUTED EARNINGS PER SHARE 5.50 5.24 3.08 2.32 1.45 CASH DIVIDENDS PER COMMON SHARE .30 .30 .30 .30 .30
  33. 33. MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS RESULTS OF OPERATIONS OVERVIEW Revenues are primarily generated from the Company’s (i) homebuilding operations in the United States and France and (ii) its domestic mortgage banking operations. Domestically, the Company’s construction revenues are generated from operating divisions in the following regional groups: “West Coast” – California; “Southwest” – Arizona, Nevada and New Mexico; and “Central” – Colorado, Florida and Texas. Internationally, the Company operates in France through a majority-owned subsidiary. In January 2001, the Company changed its name from “Kaufman and Broad Home Corporation” to “KB Home.” This new name, which resulted from homebuyer input, was intended to convey the Company’s strong customer focus and its commitment to helping homebuyers realize their dream of home ownership. The Company achieved record earnings for the fourth consecutive year in 2001 and delivered 24,538 homes, the largest number of units delivered during any single year in its history. Total Company revenues reached a record $4.57 billion in 2001, up 16.4% from $3.93 billion in 2000, which had increased 2.5% from $3.84 billion in 1999. The increase in revenues in 2001 was mainly due to an increase in housing revenues. The modest increase in revenues in 2000 compared to 1999 was primarily attributable to higher housing and land sale revenues. Included in total Company revenues were mortgage banking revenues of $72.5 million in 2001, $60.4 million in 2000 and $64.2 million in 1999. Net income for the year ended November 30, 2001 increased to $214.2 million, or $5.50 per diluted share, from $210.0 million, or $5.24 per diluted share, for the year ended November 30, 2000. The results for 2000 included a one-time gain of $39.6 million, or $.99 per diluted share, on the issuance of stock by the Company’s French subsidiary in an initial public offering (the “French IPO” gain). Excluding the French IPO gain, 2000 net income and diluted earnings per share were $170.4 million and $4.25, respectively. In 2001, net income rose on higher unit delivery volume, expanded gross margins and increased net income from mortgage banking operations. Net income in 2000 was 42.4% higher than the $147.5 million, or $3.08 per diluted share, recorded in 1999. Excluding the French IPO gain in 2000 and excluding an after-tax secondary marketing trading loss of $11.8 million, or $.25 per diluted share, recorded in 1999 as a result of unauthorized trading by an employee of the Company’s mortgage banking subsidiary, earnings per share in 2000 were 27.6% higher than 1999 results. Excluding the impact of the trading loss, net income for 1999 was $159.2 million and diluted earnings per share were $3.33. In 2000, the increase in diluted earnings per share was principally driven by the combined effect of a higher housing gross margin, lower selling, general and administrative expenses, a lower effective income tax rate and a 16.2% reduction in the average number of diluted shares outstanding due to the Company’s share repurchase program. KBH 32 33
  34. 34. CONSTRUCTION REVENUES Construction revenues reached an all-time high of $4.50 billion in 2001, increasing 16.3% from $3.87 billion in 2000, which had increased from $3.77 billion in 1999. The increase in 2001 was mainly due to higher housing revenues driven by increased unit delivery volume and a higher average selling price. In 2000, the improvement was primarily the result of increased housing and land sale revenues. UNCONSOLIDATED WEST COAST SOUTHWEST CENTRAL FOREIGN TOTAL JOINT VENTURES UNIT DELIVERIES 2001 First 981 1,248 1,746 553 4,528 84 Second 1,388 1,503 2,121 711 5,723 98 Third 1,553 1,690 2,432 798 6,473 79 Fourth 1,628 1,797 3,069 1,320 7,814 69 Total 5,550 6,238 9,368 3,382 24,538 330 2000 First 1,128 1,264 1,653 520 4,565 123 Second 1,207 1,349 1,884 602 5,042 137 Third 1,444 1,596 1,944 726 5,710 102 Fourth 1,697 1,623 2,631 1,124 7,075 93 Total 5,476 5,832 8,112 2,972 22,392 455 NET ORDERS 2001 First 1,176 1,973 2,531 664 6,344 65 Second 1,541 1,855 3,078 896 7,370 74 Third 1,082 1,494 2,369 720 5,665 64 Fourth 973 1,156 2,051 1,156 5,336 17 Total 4,772 6,478 10,029 3,436 24,715 220 2000 First 1,341 1,523 1,903 558 5,325 115 Second 2,178 1,875 2,888 896 7,837 121 Third 1,301 1,301 2,191 564 5,357 102 Fourth 1,198 1,337 1,941 836 5,312 106 Total 6,018 6,036 8,923 2,854 23,831 444 KBH 34 35
  35. 35. UNCONSOLIDATED WEST COAST SOUTHWEST CENTRAL FOREIGN TOTAL JOINT VENTURES ENDING BACKLOG-UNITS 2001 First 2,616 3,036 4,795 1,928 12,375 189 Second 2,769 3,388 5,752 2,113 14,022 165 Third 2,298 3,192 5,939 2,035 13,464 150 Fourth 1,643 2,551 4,921 2,012 11,127 98 2000 First 2,092 2,366 3,449 1,566 9,473 211 Second 3,063 2,892 4,453 1,860 12,268 195 Third 2,920 2,597 4,700 1,898 12,115 195 Fourth 2,421 2,311 4,010 1,817 10,559 208 ENDING BACKLOG-VALUE, IN THOUSANDS 2001 First $754,618 $460,411 $667,155 $297,706 $2,179,890 $37,611 Second 790,862 523,751 805,022 285,255 2,404,890 33,330 Third 653,487 497,700 847,614 306,470 2,305,271 30,000 Fourth 474,645 420,282 700,251 294,870 1,890,048 20,384 2000 First $495,782 $349,122 $438,739 $249,581 $1,533,224 $38,824 Second 755,243 413,692 570,012 315,151 2,054,098 36,660 Third 737,912 377,324 607,767 310,240 2,033,243 35,880 Fourth 643,620 345,609 541,258 272,901 1,803,388 42,224 Housing revenues totaled $4.37 billion in 2001, $3.77 billion in 2000 and $3.73 billion in 1999, each amount establishing a new Company record for the year in which it was reported. In 2001, housing revenues increased 15.9% over the previous year due to a 9.6% increase in unit volume, reflecting growth in all of the Company’s geographic regions, and a 5.8% increase in the average selling price. In 2000, housing revenues rose 1.0% above 1999 results due to a 1.1% increase in the average selling price; unit volume was comparable to that of 1999. Housing revenues from West Coast operations totaled $1.57 billion in 2001, up 11.6% from $1.41 billion in 2000, reflecting a 1.4% increase in unit delivery volume and a 10.2% increase in the average selling price. West Coast housing operations generated 40.6% of domestic housing revenues in 2001, down from 42.7% in 2000 and 46.8% in 1999, a trend that is consistent with the Company’s steady diversification of its domestic operations outside of California since 1993. Housing revenues generated from the Company’s Southwest region rose 16.1% to $983.1 million in 2001 from $846.9 million in 2000 due to a 7.0% increase in unit deliveries and an 8.5% increase in the average selling price. The Central region posted housing revenues of $1.32 billion, up 26.3% from $1.04 billion in 2000, the result of a 15.5% increase in unit deliveries and a 9.4% increase in the average selling price when compared to 2000. Southwest region housing revenues accounted for 25.4% of domestic housing revenues in 2001, compared to 25.7% in 2000 and 24.8% in 1999. Central region housing revenues accounted for 34.0% of domestic housing revenues in 2001, up from 31.6% in 2000 and 28.4% in 1999. In France, housing revenues of $494.8 million in 2001 rose 5.2% from $470.3 million in 2000, the result of a 14.0% increase in unit volume, partially offset by a 7.7% decrease in the average selling price. In 2000, West Coast region housing revenues decreased 9.5% from $1.56 billion in 1999 due to a 13.4% decrease in unit deliveries, partially offset by a 4.5% increase in the average selling price. Housing revenues in the Southwest region rose 2.9% in 2000 from $823.2 million in 1999, reflecting a small increase in unit deliveries and a higher average selling price. In the Central region, housing revenues in 2000 rose 10.4% from $945.4 million in 1999, the result of increases in both unit volume and average selling price. In France, housing revenues rose 16.6% in 2000 from $403.4 million in 1999, reflecting higher unit volume, partially offset by a lower average selling price. Company-wide housing deliveries increased 9.6% to 24,538 units in 2001 from 22,392 units in 2000, reflecting growth in U.S. and French deliveries of 8.9% and 14.0%, respectively. The increase in domestic deliveries was driven by improvement in each of the Company’s three geographic regions, with increases of 1.4%, 7.0% and 15.5% achieved in the West Coast, Southwest and Central regions, respectively. West Coast region deliveries increased to 5,550 units in 2001 from 5,476 units in 2000 even though the Company operated 8.1% fewer active communities in the region during 2001. Southwest region operations delivered 6,238 units in 2001, up from 5,832 units in 2000, despite a 5.1% decrease in the average number of active communities operated in this region. In the Central region, deliveries totaled 9,368 units in 2001, up from 8,112 units in 2000. The average number of active communities in the Central region rose 9.0% in 2001. French deliveries increased to 3,382 units in 2001 from 2,967 units in 2000, partly due to the inclusion of a full year of results from acquisitions made during 2000.
  36. 36. In 2000, housing deliveries of 22,392 units were essentially flat compared with the 22,422 units delivered in 1999, as a 2.6% decrease in U.S. deliveries was largely offset by a 20.4% increase in French deliveries. The decline in domestic deliveries reflected a 13.4% decrease in the West Coast region, partly offset by increases of .5% and 3.9% in the Southwest and Central regions, respectively. West Coast deliveries decreased to 5,476 units in 2000 from 6,323 units in 1999, primarily due to two factors. First, the re-focusing of the Company’s West Coast operations following the Lewis Homes acquisition, in keeping with the KBnxt business model, resulted in fewer active communities in Northern California in 2000 compared to 1999. Second, the strength of the Company’s Southwest and Central region operations, which generally offered lower risk for less investment in land, caused the Company to apply more stringent criteria with regard to its land investment decisions in the West Coast region. Southwest operations delivered 5,832 units in 2000, up slightly from 5,801 units in 1999, despite a 4.9% decrease in the average number of active communities compared to the prior year. Deliveries from Central region operations increased to 8,112 units in 2000 from 7,809 units in 1999, as the average number of active communities in the region rose 4.2% from the prior year. French deliveries increased 20.4% to 2,967 units in 2000 from 2,465 units in 1999, as a result of expansion of these operations during 2000, partly through acquisitions. The Company-wide average new home price increased 5.8% in 2001, to $178,000 from $168,300 in 2000. The 2000 average had advanced 1.1% from $166,500 in 1999. The increase in the average selling price in 2001 resulted from a higher domestic average selling price, partially offset by a lower average selling price in France. In the West Coast region, the average selling price rose 10.2% in 2001 to $283,100 from $257,000 in 2000, which had increased 4.5% from $246,000 in 1999. The average selling price in the Southwest region increased 8.5% to $157,600 in 2001, compared with $145,200 in 2000 and $141,900 in 1999. The Central region average selling price rose 9.4% to $140,700 in 2001 compared with $128,600 in 2000, which had increased 6.2% from $121,100 in 1999. The higher average selling prices in each of the Company’s domestic regions in 2001 resulted from strategic increases in sales prices made by the Company in most of its markets. The increase in 2000 also resulted from modest increases in sales prices in certain domestic markets. The Company’s average selling price in France decreased 7.7% to $146,300 in 2001 from $158,500 in 2000, which had decreased 3.1% from $163,600 in 1999. The decreases in 2001 and 2000 were largely the result of a Company strategy to increase the proportion of its French deliveries from condominiums, which are typically priced below single-family detached homes, and the adverse foreign currency translation impact resulting from a weakening in the French franc compared to the U.S. dollar. Revenues from the development of commercial buildings, all located in metropolitan Paris, totaled $69.9 million in 2001, just below the Company’s projections of $75 million to $90 million, but up substantially, as anticipated, from $.8 million in 2000 and $.7 million in 1999. The Company’s French commercial revenues increased substantially in 2001 due to the Company’s decision to expand its commercial activity as market conditions for commercial development improved. For several years prior to 2001, the Company had de-emphasized its commercial development operations, which had generated revenues as high as $362.3 million in 1990, in light of less favorable commercial market conditions. Land sale revenues totaled $64.8 million in 2001, $100.5 million in 2000 and $37.8 million in 1999. Generally, land sale revenues fluctuate with management’s decisions to maintain or decrease the Company’s land ownership position in certain markets based upon the volume of its holdings, the strength and number of competing developers entering particular markets at given points in time, the availability of land in markets served by the Company and prevailing market conditions. The results for 2001 and 1999 are more representative of typical historical Company land sales activity levels. In contrast, land sale revenues were higher in 2000 as a result of the Company’s adoption of an asset repositioning strategy, in late 1999, which included the identification and sale of non-core assets. O P E R AT I N G I N CO M E Operating income increased to a new Company record of $352.3 million in 2001, which was 22.1% higher than the previous record of $288.6 million achieved in 2000. As a percentage of revenues, operating income rose to 7.8% in 2001 from 7.5% in 2000. Housing gross profits in 2001 increased 17.8% or $132.7 million to $876.4 million from $743.7 million in 2000. As a percentage of related revenues, the housing gross profit margin was 20.1% in 2001, up from 19.7% in the prior year, primarily due to a higher average selling price. The Company’s housing gross profit margin also showed sequential improvement during each quarter of 2001 progressing from 19.5% in the first quarter to 20.8% in the fourth quarter. Commercial activities in France generated profits of $10.6 million in 2001, compared to $.2 million in 2000. Company-wide land sales generated profits of $1.7 million in 2001 and $2.8 million in 2000. Selling, general and administrative expenses totaled $536.5 million in 2001 compared with $458.0 million in 2000. As a percentage of housing revenues, to which these expenses are most closely correlated, selling, general and administrative expenses increased slightly to 12.3% in 2001 from 12.2% in 2000. For the first nine months of 2001, the Company achieved a lower selling, general and administrative expense ratio compared to the same period of 2000. However, selling expenses rose significantly in the fourth quarter as marketing efforts had to be stepped-up to stimulate traffic in the aftermath of the September 11th tragedy and to attract sales in the increasingly competitive marketplace. Provided there are no further negative consequences from the terrorist activities and U.S. response, and subject to other risk factors described below, the Company expects selling expenses to remain at higher levels during the first quarter of 2002 and return to more normal levels in the remainder of the year.
  37. 37. Operating income increased 11.4% to $288.6 million in 2000 from $259.1 million in 1999. This increase was primarily due to higher housing gross profits and lower selling, general and administrative expenses. Housing gross profits in 2000 increased 3.0%, or $22.1 million, to $743.7 million from $721.6 million in 1999. As a percentage of related revenues, the housing gross profit margin was 19.7% in 2000, up from 19.3% in the prior year. This increase was primarily due to an improved pricing environment, generally favorable market conditions throughout 2000, deeper execution of the KBnxt operational business model and a reduction in the negative impact of purchase accounting associated with the 1999 acquisition of Lewis Homes. Company-wide land sales generated a profit of $2.8 million in 2000, compared to a loss of $1.2 million in 1999. Selling, general and administrative expenses decreased to $458.0 million in 2000 from $461.3 million in 1999. As a percentage of housing revenues, selling, general and administrative expenses decreased to 12.2% in 2000 from 12.4% in 1999. The improved ratio resulted from savings generated by the Company’s cost-containment initiatives. I N T E R E S T I N CO M E A N D E X P E N S E Interest income, which is generated from short-term investments and mortgages receivable, amounted to $3.6 million in 2001, $5.8 million in 2000 and $7.8 million in 1999. The decrease in interest income in 2001 resulted primarily from a lower interest bearing average balance of mortgages receivable compared to 2000. Interest income declined in 2000 due to a decrease in the interest bearing average balances of both short-term investments and mortgages receivable compared to 1999. Interest expense results principally from borrowings to finance land purchases, housing inventory and other operating and capital needs. In 2001, interest expense, net of amounts capitalized, increased by $9.6 million to $41.1 million, up from $31.5 million in 2000. Gross interest incurred in 2001 was $8.8 million higher than that incurred in 2000, reflecting an increase in average indebtedness. The percentages of interest capitalized in 2001 and 2000 were 60.1% and 66.6%, respectively. In 2000, interest expense, net of amounts capitalized, increased to $31.5 million from $28.3 million in 1999. Gross interest incurred in 2000 was $16.2 million higher than that incurred in 1999, reflecting an increase in average indebtedness. The percentage of interest capitalized in 2000 increased from 63.7% capitalized in 1999. MINORITY INTERESTS Minority interests are comprised of two major components: pretax income of consolidated subsidiaries and joint ventures related to residential and commercial activities; and distributions associated with the Company’s Feline Prides securities. Operating income was reduced by minority interests of $27.9 million in 2001, $31.6 million in 2000 and $29.4 million in 1999. Minority interests in 2001, 2000 and 1999 included distributions of $11.4 million, $15.2 million and $15.2 million, respectively, associated with the Feline Prides. Since the Feline Prides mandatorily converted into common stock of the Company on August 16, 2001, minority interests in future periods will no longer include distributions associated with these securities. In 2001 and 2000, minority interests reflected the impact of the Company’s French IPO. E Q U I T Y I N P R E TA X I N CO M E O F U N CO N S O L I D AT E D J O I N T V E N T U R E S The Company’s unconsolidated joint venture activities were located in Nevada, New Mexico and France in 2001; California, Nevada, New Mexico and France in 2000; and California, Nevada, New Mexico, Texas and France in 1999. These unconsolidated joint ventures posted combined revenues of $82.1 million in 2001, $116.8 million in 2000 and $13.9 million in 1999. Revenues from unconsolidated joint ventures in 2001 and 2000 were substantially higher than in 1999 primarily due to the inclusion of a joint venture related to a Nevada community. All unconsolidated joint venture revenues in 2001, 2000 and 1999 were generated from residential properties. Unconsolidated joint ventures generated combined pretax income of $6.5 million in 2001, $4.9 million in 2000 and $3.6 million in 1999. The Company’s share of pretax income from unconsolidated joint ventures totaled $3.9 million in 2001, $2.9 million in 2000 and $.2 million in 1999. G A I N O N I S S U A N C E O F F R E N C H S U B S I D I A R Y S TO C K The Company recognized a one-time gain of $39.6 million from the issuance of 5,314,327 common shares (including the over allotment option) by Kaufman & Broad S.A. (“KBSA”), the Company’s French subsidiary, in an initial public offering in the first quarter of 2000. The offering was made in France and elsewhere in Europe and was priced at 23 euros per share. Since the initial public offering, KBSA has been listed on the Premier Marché of the ParisBourse. The offering generated total net proceeds of $113.1 million, of which $82.9 million was used by the Company to reduce its domestic debt and repurchase shares of its common stock. The remainder of the proceeds was used to fund internal and external growth of KBSA. Since the initial public offering, the Company has maintained a 57% majority ownership interest in KBSA and continues to consolidate these operations in its financial statements. MORTGAGE BANKING I N T E R E S T I N CO M E A N D E X P E N S E The Company’s mortgage banking operations provide financing principally to purchasers of homes sold by the Company’s domestic housing operations through the origination of residential mortgages. Interest income is earned primarily from first mortgages and mortgage-backed securities held for long-term investment as collateral, while interest expense results from notes payable and the collateralized mortgage obligations. Interest income increased to $21.9 million in 2001 from $21.1 million in 2000 and $19.2 million in 1999. Interest expense decreased to $18.4 million in 2001 from $19.4 million in 2000, which had increased from $16.9 million in 1999. Interest income increased in both 2001 and 2000 primarily due to a higher balance of first mortgages held under commitments of sale and other receivables outstanding compared to the previous year. KBH 36 37
  38. 38. Interest expense decreased in 2001 from the previous year due to lower interest rates. Interest expense rose in 2000 from 1999 due to a higher amount of notes payable outstanding compared to 1999. Combined interest income and expense resulted in net interest income of $3.5 million in 2001, $1.7 million in 2000 and $2.3 million in 1999. These differences reflect variations in mortgage production mix; movements in short-term versus long-term interest rates; and the amount, timing and rates of return on interim reinvestments of monthly principal amortization and prepayments. OT H E R M O R TG A G E B A N K I N G R E V E N U E S Other mortgage banking revenues, which principally consist of gains on sales of mortgages and servicing rights and, to a lesser extent, mortgage servicing fees and insurance commissions, totaled $50.5 million in 2001, $39.2 million in 2000 and $45.0 million in 1999. The increase in 2001 reflected higher gains on the sales of mortgages and servicing rights primarily due to a higher volume of mortgage originations associated both with increases in underlying housing unit delivery volume and higher retention. By “retention,” the Company is referring to the percentage of the Company’s domestic homebuyers using the Company’s mortgage banking subsidiary as a loan originator. Also contributing to the increase in 2001 was a shift in product mix toward a higher proportion of fixed rate loans. In 2000, the decrease in other mortgage banking revenues was primarily the result of lower gains on the sales of mortgages and servicing rights due to lower unit delivery volume. Interest rate increases during 2000, including a shift in product mix toward more variable rate loans, lower retention and the intensely competitive mortgage banking environment also contributed to the decrease. G E N E R A L A N D A D M I N I S T R AT I V E E X P E N S E S General and administrative expenses associated with the mortgage banking operations increased to $20.3 million in 2001 from $17.2 million in 2000 and $11.6 million in 1999. In 2001, general and administrative expenses increased as a result of the expansion of certain ancillary businesses, higher staff levels in place to accommodate the Company’s higher backlog and the overall growth of the mortgage banking operations in anticipation of higher origination volumes. The increase in general and administrative expenses in 2000 was primarily due to expansion of the operations. S E CO N D A R Y M A R K E T I N G T R A D I N G LO S S On August 31, 1999, the Company disclosed that it had discovered unauthorized mortgage loan trading activity by an employee of its mortgage banking subsidiary resulting in a pretax trading loss of $18.2 million ($11.8 million, or $.25 per diluted share, on an after-tax basis). It is normal practice for the Company’s mortgage banking subsidiary to sell loans into the market that approximately match loan commitments to the Company’s homebuyers. This practice is intended to hedge exposure to changes in interest rates that may occur until loans are sold to secondary market investors in the ordinary course of its business. The loss was the result of a single employee engaging in unauthorized mortgage loan trading largely unrelated to mortgage originations. The employee who conducted the unauthorized trading was terminated. INCOME TAXES The Company recorded income tax expense of $110.3 million in 2001, $87.7 million in 2000 and $79.4 million in 1999. These amounts represented effective income tax rates of approximately 34.0% in both 2001 and 2000 (excluding the one-time gain on the issuance of French subsidiary stock in 2000) and 35.0% in 1999. The effective tax rate declined by 1.0 percentage point in 2000 as a result of greater utilization of tax credits. Pretax income for financial reporting purposes and taxable income for income tax purposes historically have differed primarily due to the impact of state income taxes, foreign tax rate differences, intercompany dividends and the use of tax credits. LIQUIDITY AND CAPITAL RESOURCES The Company assesses its liquidity in terms of its ability to generate cash to fund its operating and investing activities. Historically, the Company has funded its construction and mortgage banking activities with internally generated cash flows and external sources of debt and equity financing. Operating, investing and financing activities provided net cash of $248.3 million in 2001 and $4.7 million in 2000. Operating activities provided $45.9 million in 2001 and $52.9 million in 2000. The Company’s sources of operating cash in 2001 included earnings of $214.2 million, an increase in accounts payable, accrued expenses and other liabilities of $295.9 million, other operating sources of $21.3 million and various noncash items deducted from net income. The increase in accounts payable, accrued expenses and other liabilities primarily reflected increased production activity at the end of the year as the Company’s payment terms were essentially unchanged from the previous year. The cash pro- vided was partially offset by an increase in receivables of $372.9 million and investments in inventories of $137.1 million (excluding the effect of acqui- sitions and $54.6 million of inventories acquired through seller financing). In 2000, the sources of operating cash included earnings of $210.0 million and various noncash items deducted from net income. The cash provided was partially offset by an investment of $96.1 million in inventories (excluding the effect of acquisitions and $25.1 million of inventories acquired through seller financing), a decrease of $55.0 million in accounts payable, accrued expenses and other liabilities, an increase of $53.9 million in receivables and a gain of $39.6 million on the issuance of French subsidiary stock. Cash used by investing activities totaled $48.3 million in 2001 and $24.9 million in 2000. In 2001, $53.7 million, net of cash acquired, was used for two acquisitions and $12.2 million was used for net purchases of property and equipment. Partially offsetting these uses were proceeds of $7.9 million received from mortgage-backed securities, which were principally used to pay down collateralized mortgage obligations for which the mortgage- backed securities had served as collateral, distributions of $5.4 million relating to investments in unconsolidated joint ventures and net sales of $4.3 million of mortgages held for long-term investment. KBH 38 39
  39. 39. In 2000, cash used by investing activities included $24.3 million, net of cash acquired, used for acquisitions, $18.5 million used for net purchases of property and equipment and $2.6 million used for originations of mortgages held for long-term investment. Partially offsetting these uses were distri- butions of $13.9 million related to investments in unconsolidated joint ventures and proceeds of $6.6 million received from mortgage-backed securities. Financing activities in 2001 provided $250.6 million of cash compared to $23.3 million used in 2000. In 2001, sources of financing cash included $247.5 million from the issuance of 91⁄2% senior subordinated notes, $37.9 million from the issuance of common stock under employee stock plans and $5.1 million from net proceeds on borrowings. Partially offsetting the cash provided were payments to minority interests of $21.1 million, cash dividend payments of $11.2 million and payments on collateralized mortgage obligations of $7.6 million. Pursuant to its universal shelf registration statement filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on December 5, 1997 (the “1997 Shelf Registration”), the Company issued the $250.0 million 91⁄2% senior subordinated notes at 100% of the principal amount of the notes. The notes, which are due February 15, 2011 with interest payable semi- annually, represent unsecured obligations of the Company and are subordinated to all existing and future senior indebtedness of the Company. The notes are redeemable at the option of the Company, in whole, or in part, at 104.750% of their principal amount beginning February 15, 2006, and thereafter at prices declining annually to 100% on and after February 15, 2009. The Company’s financial leverage, as measured by the ratio of debt to total capital was 49.9% at the end of 2001 compared to 53.9% at the end of 2000. The Company seeks to maintain its ratio of debt to total capital within a targeted range of 45% to 55%. Financing activities in 2000 used $169.2 million for the repurchase of common stock (excluding $78.0 million of common stock repurchased through the issuance of promissory notes), $20.1 million for payments to minority interests, $11.5 million for cash dividend payments and $6.3 million for payments on collateralized mortgage obligations. Partially offsetting these uses were $113.1 million of proceeds from the issuance of French subsidiary stock, $59.1 million of net proceeds from borrowings and $11.6 million from the issuance of common stock under employee stock plans. On July 19, 2001, the Company acquired Trademark Home Builders, Inc. (“Trademark”), a builder of single-family homes in Jacksonville, Florida. The acquisition marked the Company’s entry into Florida. Trademark was acquired for approximately $30.1 million, including the assumption of approximately $16.3 million in debt, and was accounted for under the purchase method of accounting. The excess of the purchase price over the estimated fair value of net assets acquired was $9.2 million and was allocated to goodwill and assigned to the Company’s construction segment. On September 26, 2001, KBSA completed the acquisition of Résidences Bernard Teillaud (“RBT”), a France-based builder of condominiums. As a result of the acquisition, KBSA anticipates having a leading market position in the Rhône-Alps region of France. RBT was acquired for approximately $28.7 million and was accounted for under the purchase method of accounting. The excess of the purchase price over the estimated fair value of net assets acquired was $10.2 million and was allocated to goodwill and assigned to the Company’s construction segment. In accordance with Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 142, “Goodwill and Other Intangible Assets,”(“SFAS No. 142”), the goodwill amounts recorded in connection with the acquisitions of Trademark and RBT will not be amortized but will be reviewed for impairment on an annual basis. The results of Trademark and RBT were included in the Company’s consolidated financial statements as of their respective acquisition dates. During the year ended November 30, 2000, the Company’s French subsidiary, KBSA, completed the acquisitions of four homebuilders in France. These companies were acquired for an aggregate purchase price of $33.5 million and were accounted for under the purchase method of accounting. The excess of the purchase price over the estimated fair value of the net assets acquired was $24.7 million and was allocated to goodwill. Through November 30, 2001, the Company amortized the goodwill on a straight-line basis over a period of ten years. However, in accordance with SFAS No. 142, which the Company adopted as of December 1, 2001, in future periods the goodwill will no longer be amortized but will be reviewed for impairment on an annual basis. In 2000, common stock repurchases made under the Company’s share repurchase program totaled $247.0 million. The Company’s share repurchase program was established in August 1999. The Company repurchased approximately 10.7 million shares in 2000, thereby completing the purchase of all the 14.5 million shares of common stock previously authorized for repurchase by the Company’s Board of Directors. Included in the shares repurchased during 2000 were 4.0 million shares which had been issued as partial consideration for the January 1999 acquisition of Lewis Homes and were repurchased in a private transaction from the Lewis Homes sellers in September 2000. On September 21, 2000, in connection with the repurchase of 4.0 million shares from the Lewis holders, the Company issued promissory notes (the “Shareholder Notes”) with an aggregate principal amount of $78.0 million to the Lewis holders. Interest on the Shareholder Notes accrued monthly at 3 a rate of 6 ⁄5%. The Company paid off the Shareholder Notes during the year ended November 30, 2001, prior to their scheduled maturity date of December 6, 2001. On October 4, 2001, the Company’s Board of Directors approved a new stock repurchase authorization of up to 4.0 million additional shares of the Company’s common stock. The authorization positions management to opportunistically purchase common shares from time to time on the open market or in privately negotiated transactions. No shares had been repurchased under this authorization as of November 30, 2001.
  40. 40. In connection with its share repurchase program, on August 27, 1999, the Company established a grantor stock ownership trust (the “Trust”) into which certain shares repurchased in 2000 and 1999 were transferred. The Trust, administered by an independent trustee, acquires, holds and distributes the shares of common stock for the purpose of funding certain employee compensation and employee benefit obligations of the Company under its existing stock option, 401(k) and other employee benefit plans. The existence of the Trust has no impact on the amount of benefits or compensation that is paid under these plans. For financial reporting purposes, the Trust is consolidated with the Company. Any dividend transactions between the Company and the Trust are eliminated. Acquired shares held by the Trust remain valued at the market price at the date of purchase and are shown as a reduction to stockholders’ equity in the consolidated balance sheet. The difference between the Trust share value and the fair market value on the date shares are released from the Trust, for the benefit of employees, is included in additional paid-in capital. Common stock held in the Trust is not considered outstanding in the computation of earnings per share. The Trust held 8.1 million and 8.8 million shares of common stock at November 30, 2001 and 2000, respectively. The trustee votes shares held by the Trust in accordance with voting directions from eligible employees, as specified in a trust agreement with the trustee. External sources of financing for the Company’s construction activities include its domestic unsecured credit facility, other domestic and foreign bank lines, third-party secured financings, and the public debt and equity markets. Substantial unused lines of credit remain available for the Company’s future use, if required, principally through its domestic unsecured revolving credit facility. On October 6, 2000, the Company entered into an unsecured credit agreement (the “Unsecured Credit Facility”) consisting of a four-year committed revolving credit facility and a five-year term loan, which together replaced its previously existing revolving credit facility and term loan agreement. The Unsecured Credit Facility totaled $732.0 million at November 30, 2001 and was comprised of a $564.1 million four-year committed revolving credit facility and a $167.9 million five-year term loan. The Unsecured Credit Facility has the capacity to be expanded up to an aggregate total of $900.0 million if additional bank lending commitments are obtained. Interest on the Unsecured Credit Facility is payable monthly at the London Interbank Offered Rate plus an applicable spread on amounts borrowed. The Company had $536.3 million available for its future use under the Unsecured Credit Facility at November 30, 2001. In addition, the Company’s French subsidiaries have lines of credit with various banks which totaled $321.7 million at November 30, 2001 and have various committed expiration dates through November 2006. Under these unsecured financing agreements, $184.0 million was available to the Company’s French subsidiaries at November 30, 2001. Depending upon available terms and its negotiating leverage related to specific market conditions, the Company also finances certain land acquisitions with purchase-money financing from land sellers and other third parties. At November 30, 2001, the Company had outstanding seller-financed notes payable of $58.6 million secured primarily by the underlying property which had a carrying value of $172.2 million. The Company’s primary contractual financing obligations at November 30, 2001 were comprised of senior and senior subordinated notes, term loan borrowings, shareholder notes, mortgages, land contracts and other loans with principal payments due as follows: 2002: $40.9 million; 2003: $186.8 million; 2004: $180.6 million; 2005: $168.0 million; 2006: $124.6 million and thereafter: $250.0 million. The Company also had contractual cash ations under various operating lease commitments, which primarily had terms of less than thre On October 15, 2001 the Company filed a universal shelf registration statement (as subsequently amended, the “2001 Shelf Registration”) with the Securities and Exchange Commission for up to $750.0 million of the Company’s debt and equity securities, which amount ultimately included $50.0 million in unused capacity under the Company’s previously existing 1997 Shelf Registration after giving effect to the issuance of $200.0 million of 85⁄8% senior subordinated notes in December 2001. The 2001 Shelf Registration was declared effective on January 28, 2002 and provides that securities may be offered from time to time in one or more series and in the form of senior, senior subordinated or subordinated debt, preferred stock, common stock, stock purchase contracts, stock purchase units and/or warrants to purchase such securities. As of February 15, 2002 no securities had been issued under the 2001 Shelf Registration and $750.0 million of capacity remained available. On July 7, 1998, the Company, together with a KBHC Trust that was wholly owned by the Company, issued an aggregate of (i)19.0 million Feline Prides securities, and (ii)1.0 million KBHC Trust capital securities, with a $10 stated liquidation amount. The Feline Prides consisted of (i)18.0 million Income Prides with the stated amount per Income Prides of $10, which were units comprised of a capital security and a stock purchase contract under which the holders were to purchase common stock from the Company not later than August 16, 2001 and the Company was to pay to the holders certain unsecured contract adjustment payments, and (ii)1.0 million Growth Prides with a face amount per Growth Prides equal to the $10 stated amount, which were units consisting of a 1/100th beneficial interest in a zero-coupon U.S. Treasury security and a stock purchase contract under which the holders were to purchase common stock from the Company not later than August 16, 2001 and the Company was to pay to the holders certain unsecured contract adjustment payments. The KBHC Trust utilized the proceeds from the issuance of the Feline Prides and capital securities to purchase an equivalent principal amount of the Company’s 8% debentures due August 16, 2003 (the “8% Debentures”). The 8% Debentures were the sole asset of the KBHC Trust. On August 16, 2001, all of the Company’s Feline Prides mandatorily converted into approximately 6.0 million shares of the Company’s common stock. In connection with the conversion, all of the 8% Debentures held by the KBHC Trust were retired and the KBHC Trust was subsequently dissolved.
  41. 41. The Company uses its capital resources primarily for land purchases, land development and housing construction. The Company typically manages its investments in land by purchasing property under options and other types of conditional contracts whenever possible, and similarly controls its investment in housing inventories by strongly emphasizing the pre-sale of homes over speculative construction and carefully managing the timing of the production process. The Company’s backlog ratio (beginning backlog as a percentage of unit deliveries in the succeeding quarter) was approximately 174.0% for the fourth quarter of 2001 and was essentially flat when compared to the ratio for the fourth quarter of 2000. The Company’s inventories have become significantly more geographically diverse in the last decade, primarily as a result of the Company’s extensive domestic expansion outside of the West Coast region. As of November 30, 2001, 24.3% of the lots owned or controlled by the Company were located in the West Coast region, with 23.5% in the Southwest region, 43.7% in the Central region and 8.5% in France. The Company continues to concentrate its housing operations in desirable areas within targeted growth markets, principally oriented toward entry-level and first-time move up purchasers. The principal sources of liquidity for the Company’s mortgage banking operations are internally generated funds from the sales of mortgages and related servicing rights. Mortgages originated by the mortgage banking operations are generally sold in the secondary market within 60 days of origination. External sources of financing for these operations include a $300.0 million revolving mortgage warehouse agreement (the “Mortgage Warehouse Facility”) and a $200.0 million Master Loan and Security Agreement. The Master Loan and Security Agreement was renewed on May 24, 2001 with an investment bank. The agreement, which expires on May 25, 2002, provides for a facility fee based on the maximum credit amount available and provides for interest to be paid monthly at the Eurodollar Rate plus an applicable spread on amounts borrowed. During the fourth quarter of 2001, the Company’s mortgage banking subsidiary negotiated a temporary increase in the maximum credit amount available under the Master Loan and Security Agreement to $325.0 million through December 31, 2001. The temporary increase was necessary to meet the Company’s increased volume of mortgage loan originations. The Mortgage Warehouse Facility, which expires on February 18, 2003, provides for an annual fee based on the committed balance of the facility and provides for interest at either the London Interbank Offered Rate or the Federal Funds Rate plus an applicable spread on amounts borrowed. The amounts outstanding under the Mortgage Warehouse Facility and the Master Loan and Security Agreement are secured by a borrowing base, which includes certain mortgage loans held under commitments of sale, and are repayable from sales proceeds. There are no compensating balance requirements under either facility. Both facilities include financial covenants and restrictions which, among other things, require the maintenance of certain financial statement ratios, a minimum tangible net worth and a minimum net income. Due to the increased volume of mortgage loan originations in the fourth quarter of 2001, a substantial portion of the borrowing capacity available to the mortgage banking operations was utilized at November 30, 2001. At November 30, 2001, the Company’s mortgage banking operations had $19.1 million available under its $300.0 million Mortgage Warehouse Facility and $10.8 million available under its Master Loan and Security Agreement, which had been temporarily increased to $325.0 million. The maximum credit amount available under the Master Loan and Security Agreement was reduced to the original amount of $200.0 million subsequent to December 31, 2001 and all terms of the original agreement remain as they were prior to the temporary increase. The Company believes its sources of financing are adequate to fund its mortgage banking operations. Debt service on the Company’s collateralized mortgage obligations is funded by receipts from mortgage-backed securities. Such funds are expected to be adequate to meet future debt-payment schedules for the collateralized mortgage obligations and therefore these securities have virtually no impact on the capital resources and liquidity of the mortgage banking operations. The Company continues to benefit in all of its operations from the strength of its capital position, which has allowed it to maintain overall profitability during troubled economic times, finance domestic and international expansion, re-engineer product lines and diversify into new markets. Secure access to capital at competitive rates, among other reasons, should enable the Company to continue to grow and expand. As a result of its geographic diversification, the disciplines of its KBnxt operational business model and its strong capital position, the Company believes it has adequate resources and sufficient credit facilities to satisfy its current and reasonably anticipated future requirements for funds needed to acquire capital assets and land, construct homes, fund its mortgage banking operations, and meet other needs of its business, both on a short and long-term basis. CONVERSION TO THE EURO CURRENCY On January 1, 1999, certain member countries of the European Union (the “EU”) established fixed conversion rates between their existing currencies and the EU’s common currency (the “euro”). The Company conducts substantial business in France, an EU member country. During the established transition period for the introduction of the euro, which extends to June 30, 2002, the Company will address the issues involved with the adoption of the new currency. The most important issues associated with the conversion, including: the conversion of information technology systems; the reassess- ment of currency risk; the negotiation and amendment of contracts; and the processing of tax and accounting records, have been addressed by the Company and resulted in no material impact on the Company’s financial results. Based upon its progress to date, the Company believes that use of the euro will not have a significant impact on the manner in which it conducts its business affairs and processes its business and accounting records. Accordingly, conversion to the euro is not expected to have a material effect on the Company’s financial condition or results of operations. KBH 40 41
  42. 42. SUBSEQUENT EVENT On December 14, 2001, pursuant to the 1997 Shelf Registration, the Company issued $200.0 million of 85⁄8% senior subordinated notes at 100% of the principal amount of the notes. The notes, which are due December 15, 2008, with interest payable semi-annually, represent unsecured obligations of the Company and are subordinated to all existing and future senior indebtedness of the Company. Before December 15, 2004, the Company may redeem up to 35% of the aggregate principal amount of the notes with the net proceeds of one or more public or private equity offerings at a redemption price of 108.625% of their principal amount, together with accrued and unpaid interest. The notes are not otherwise redeemable at the option of the Company. The Company used $175.0 million of the net proceeds from the issuance of the notes to redeem all of its outstanding 93⁄8% senior subordinated notes due 2003. The remaining net proceeds were used for general corporate purposes. CRITICAL ACCOUNTING POLICIES As discussed in Note 1 to the Company’s consolidated financial statements, housing and other real estate sales are recognized when title passes to the buyer and certain other conditions are met. As a result, the Company’s revenue recognition process does not involve significant judgments or estimations. Nonetheless, the Company does rely on certain estimates to determine the related construction and land costs and resulting gross margins associated with revenues recognized. The Company’s construction and land costs are comprised of direct and allocated costs, including estimated costs for future warranties and amenities. Land, land improvements and other common costs are allocated on a relative fair value basis to units within a parcel or subdivision. Land and land development costs generally include related interest and property taxes incurred until development is substantially completed or deliveries have begun within a subdivision. In determining a portion of the construction and land costs for each period, the Company relies on project budgets that are based on a variety of assumptions, including assumptions about construction schedules and future costs to be incurred. It is possible that actual results could differ from budgeted amounts for various reasons, including construction delays, increases in costs which have not yet been committed, or unforeseen issues encountered during construction that fall outside the scope of contracts obtained. While the actual results for a particular construction project are accurately reported over time, a variance between the budget and actual costs could result in the understatement or overstatement of construction and land costs and construction gross margins in a specific reporting period. To reduce the potential for such distortion, the Company has set forth procedures that collectively comprise a critical accounting policy. These procedures, which have been applied by the Company on a consistent basis, include assessing and revising project budgets on a monthly basis, obtaining commitments from subcontractors and vendors for future costs to be incurred, reviewing the adequacy of warranty accruals and historical warranty claims experience, and utilizing the most recent information available to estimate construction and land costs to be charged to expense. The variances between budget and actual amounts identified by the Company have historically not had a material impact on its consolidated results of operations. Management believes that the Company’s policies provide for reasonably dependable estimates to be used in the calculation and reporting of construction and land costs. As disclosed in the consolidated financial statements, the Company had goodwill in the amount of $190.8 million at November 30, 2001. In connection with the adoption of SFAS No. 142, the Company performed an impairment test of goodwill as of December 1, 2001 which resulted in no impairment being identified. However, the process of evaluating goodwill for impairment involves the determination of the fair value of the Company’s reporting units. Inherent in such fair value determinations are certain judgments and estimates, including the interpretation of current economic indicators and market valuations, and assumptions about the Company’s strategic plans with regard to its operations. To the extent additional information arises or the Company’s strategies change, it is possible that the Company’s conclusion regarding goodwill impairment could change and result in a material effect on its financial position or results of operations. As discussed in Note 10 to the consolidated financial statements, the Company is involved in litigation incidental to its business, the disposition of which is expected to have no material effect on the Company’s financial position or results of operations. It is possible, however, that future results of opera- tions for any particular quarterly or annual period could be materially affected by changes in the Company’s assumptions related to these proceedings. The Company accrues its best estimate of the probable cost for the resolution of legal claims. Such estimates are developed in consultation with outside counsel handling these matters and are based upon a combination of litigation and settlement strategies. To the extent additional information arises or the Company’s strategies change, it is possible that the Company’s best estimate of its probable liability in these matters may change. RECENT ACCOUNTING PRONOUNCEMENTS In June 2001, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 141, “Business Combinations,” (“SFAS No.141”). SFAS No. 141 requires all business combinations to be accounted for using the purchase method of accounting and is effective for all business combinations with a closing date after June 30, 2001. The Company’s adoption of SFAS No. 141 did not have a material effect on its operating results or financial condition in 2001. Also in June 2001, the FASB issued SFAS No. 142. SFAS No. 142 requires goodwill to be tested for impairment under certain circumstances, and written off when impaired, rather than amortized as previous standards required. SFAS No. 142 is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2001, although early application is permitted for entities, like the Company, with fiscal years beginning after March 15, 2001. KBH 42 43
  43. 43. The Company adopted SFAS No. 142 on December 1, 2001, earlier than required. Application of the nonamortization provisions of SFAS No. 142 by the Company will result in the elimination of amortization expense of approximately $28.0 million in 2002. The Company will test goodwill for impairment using the two-step process prescribed in SFAS No. 142. The first step is a screen for potential impairment, while the second step measures the amount of impairment, if any. The impairment test of goodwill performed by the Company as of December 1, 2001 indicated no impairment. OUTLOOK The Company’s residential backlog at November 30, 2001 reached 11,127 units, the highest year-end backlog level in its history, and represented aggregate future revenues of $1.89 billion, also a year-end record. The Company’s backlog in terms of units and value at November 30, 2001 increased 5.4% and 4.8%, respectively, compared to 10,559 units in residential backlog, representing aggregate future revenues of $1.80 billion, at year-end 2000. Company-wide net orders of 5,336 units for the quarter ending November 30, 2001 were essentially even with the 5,312 net orders reported in the corresponding quarter of 2000. The Company experienced significant volatility in its net orders during the fourth quarter of 2001 following the September 11th terrorist attacks, with year-over-year September domestic net orders down 20.5%. However, net orders regained strength later in the fourth quarter, with year-over-year comparisons for the second and third months of the quarter showing sequential improvement and the month of November 2001 showing improvement over November 2000. Despite the impact of the September 11th tragedy on fourth quarter net orders, the Company’s domestic residential backlog at November 30, 2001 increased 4.2% to $1.60 billion, from $1.53 billion at year-end 2000. The growth in domestic backlog at year-end 2001 reflects increases in backlog in the Southwest and Central regions, partially offset by a decrease in the West Coast region. On a unit basis, domestic backlog stood at 9,115 units at year-end 2001, up 4.3% from 8,742 units at year-end 2000. The West Coast region backlog value totaled $474.6 million on 1,643 units at November 30, 2001, down from $643.6 million on 2,421 units at November 30, 2000. West Coast region net orders decreased 18.8% in the fourth quarter of 2001, to 973 units, from 1,198 units in the fourth quarter of 2000. This decrease was mainly due to year-over-year decreases in net orders for the months of September and October in the wake of the terrorist attacks. In the Southwest region, backlog value increased to $420.3 million on 2,551 units at November 30, 2001 from $345.6 million on 2,311 units at November 30, 2000. This improvement occurred without any increase in the region’s average number of active communities. In the Southwest region, fourth quarter net orders decreased 13.5% to 1,156 units in 2001 from 1,337 units in 2000, partly due to a decline in net-order activity following the events of September 11th. In the Central region, backlog value rose to $700.3 million on 4,921 units at November 30, 2001 from $541.3 million on 4,010 units at November 30, 2000. Fourth quarter net orders in the Central Region increased 5.7% to 2,051 units in 2001 from 1,941 units in the year-earlier period, despite a temporary decline in net order activity and an increase in cancellations following the terrorist attacks. In France, residential backlog at November 30, 2001 totaled $294.9 million on 2,012 units, up 8.1% and 10.7%, respectively, from $272.9 million on 1,817 units at year-end 2000. French net orders increased 38.3% to 1,156 units in the fourth quarter of 2001 from 836 units in the year-earlier period. The value of the backlog associated with French commercial development activities totaled approximately $41.6 million at November 30, 2001 compared to $88.6 million at year-end 2000. Substantially all homes included in the year-end 2001 backlog are expected to be delivered during 2002. However, cancellation rates could increase, particularly if market conditions deteriorate, international hostilities flare up, further terrorist attacks occur or mortgage interest rates increase, thereby decreasing backlog and related future revenues. Although the negative impact of the September 11th tragedy on net orders appeared generally to dissipate with the passage of time, the Company continued to experience volatility in its net orders during the first two months of fiscal 2002 with net orders down 4.6% from the comparable period of 2001. Domestic net orders during the two-month period decreased 6.3%, reflecting decreases of 26.6% and 9.3% in the Southwest and Central regions, respectively, partially offset by an increase of 35.5% in the West Coast region. In France, net orders for the first two months of fiscal 2002 increased 11.2% compared to the same period in 2001. Full-year Company-wide net order results could be further affected by global or regional market uncertainties, including acts of terrorism or other disruptions, mortgage interest rate volatility in France or the U.S., declines in consumer confidence in either country and/or other factors. With the heightened uncertainty surrounding the overall economy due to the general recessionary trends and the September 11th tragedy, the Company has, for the time being, taken a more conservative posture with regard to cash expenditures, including renegotiating or extending option periods on land purchases and terminating certain discretionary expenditures, among other things. The Company believes that having increased cash available will enhance its ability to navigate in a challenging operating environment and better position it to pursue opportunities to reduce debt, repurchase stock and acquire land and/or businesses in the future.

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