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UNITED STATES SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
                                              Washington, D.C. 20549




...
UNITEDHEALTH GROUP
                                               INDEX

                                                 ...
PART I. FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Item 1. Financial Statements (unaudited)
                                     UNITEDHEALTH ...
UNITEDHEALTH GROUP
              CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS
                                     (Una...
UNITEDHEALTH GROUP
               CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS
                                  (Unaud...
UNITEDHEALTH GROUP
             NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
                                  (Un...
UNITEDHEALTH GROUP
      NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Ì (Continued)

3.   Acquisitions
On July 29,...
UNITEDHEALTH GROUP
      NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Ì (Continued)

preliminary estimate of the f...
UNITEDHEALTH GROUP
      NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Ì (Continued)

During the three and nine mon...
UNITEDHEALTH GROUP
      NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Ì (Continued)

Estimated amortization expens...
UNITEDHEALTH GROUP
     NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Ì (Continued)

7.   Commercial Paper and Debt...
UNITEDHEALTH GROUP
     NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Ì (Continued)

Our debt arrangements and cred...
UNITEDHEALTH GROUP
       NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Ì (Continued)

cash equivalents and investm...
UNITEDHEALTH GROUP
      NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Ì (Continued)

11.   Segment Financial Infor...
UNITEDHEALTH GROUP
      NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Ì (Continued)

The following table presents ...
UNITEDHEALTH GROUP
     NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Ì (Continued)

increased signiÑcantly. As a r...
UNITEDHEALTH GROUP
      NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Ì (Continued)

to recover $25 million of cos...
REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM

To the Board of Directors and Shareholders
UnitedHealth Group Inc...
Item 2. Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

The following discussion sh...
Consolidated revenues for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2004 of $9.9 billion and
$26.7 billion, respective...
The consolidated medical care ratio for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2004 of 80.5% and
80.8%, respectivel...
Income Taxes
Our eÅective income tax rate for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2004 was 34.0% and 34.6%,
resp...
risk-based products. The remaining increase in Health Care Services revenues was largely due to growth in the
number of in...
increases. Uniprise served 9.6 million individuals and 9.2 million individuals as of September 30, 2004 and
2003, respecti...
investment decisions include our board of directors' approved investment policy, regulatory limitations, return
objectives...
United Health Group [PDF Document] Form 10-Q
United Health Group [PDF Document] Form 10-Q
United Health Group [PDF Document] Form 10-Q
United Health Group [PDF Document] Form 10-Q
United Health Group [PDF Document] Form 10-Q
United Health Group [PDF Document] Form 10-Q
United Health Group [PDF Document] Form 10-Q
United Health Group [PDF Document] Form 10-Q
United Health Group [PDF Document] Form 10-Q
United Health Group [PDF Document] Form 10-Q
United Health Group [PDF Document] Form 10-Q
United Health Group [PDF Document] Form 10-Q
United Health Group [PDF Document] Form 10-Q
United Health Group [PDF Document] Form 10-Q
United Health Group [PDF Document] Form 10-Q
United Health Group [PDF Document] Form 10-Q
United Health Group [PDF Document] Form 10-Q
United Health Group [PDF Document] Form 10-Q
United Health Group [PDF Document] Form 10-Q
United Health Group [PDF Document] Form 10-Q
United Health Group [PDF Document] Form 10-Q
United Health Group [PDF Document] Form 10-Q
United Health Group [PDF Document] Form 10-Q
United Health Group [PDF Document] Form 10-Q
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United Health Group [PDF Document] Form 10-Q

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Transcript of "United Health Group [PDF Document] Form 10-Q"

  1. 1. UNITED STATES SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Washington, D.C. 20549 Form 10-Q ≤ QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934 For the quarterly period ended September 30, 2004 or n TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934 For the transition period from to Commission Ñle number: 1-10864 UnitedHealth Group Incorporated (Exact name of registrant as speciÑed in its charter) Minnesota 41-1321939 (State or other jurisdiction of (I.R.S. Employer incorporation or organization) IdentiÑcation No.) UnitedHealth Group Center 55343 9900 Bren Road East (Zip Code) Minnetonka, Minnesota (Address of principal executive oÇces) (952) 936-1300 (Registrant's telephone number, including area code) Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has Ñled all reports required to be Ñled by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to Ñle such reports), and (2) has been subject to such Ñling requirements for the past 90 days. Yes ¥ No n Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is an accelerated Ñler (as deÑned in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes ¥ No n As of November 4, 2004, 653,628,555 shares of the registrant's Common Stock, $.01 par value per share, were issued and outstanding.
  2. 2. UNITEDHEALTH GROUP INDEX Page Number Part I. Financial Information Item 1. Financial Statements (Unaudited) Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets as of September 30, 2004 and December 31, 2003ÏÏÏ 3 Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations for the three and nine month periods ended September 30, 2004 and 2003 ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 4 Condensed Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the nine month periods ended September 30, 2004 and 2003 ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 5 Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 6 Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 18 Item 2. Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 19 Item 3. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 34 Item 4. Controls and Procedures ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 35 Part II. Other Information Item 1. Legal Proceedings ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 35 Item 2. Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 36 Item 5. Other InformationÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 37 Item 6. Exhibits and Reports on Form 8-K ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 37 Signatures ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 39 Exhibits ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 40 2
  3. 3. PART I. FINANCIAL INFORMATION Item 1. Financial Statements (unaudited) UNITEDHEALTH GROUP CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS (Unaudited) (In millions, except share and per share data) September 30, December 31, 2004 2003 ASSETS Current Assets Cash and Cash Equivalents ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ $ 3,635 $ 2,262 Short-Term Investments ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 774 486 Accounts Receivable, net ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 910 745 Assets Under ManagementÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 1,959 2,019 Deferred Income Taxes and Other ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 918 608 Total Current Assets ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 8,196 6,120 Long-Term Investments ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 8,091 6,729 Property, Equipment, Capitalized Software, and Other Assets, netÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 1,196 1,096 Goodwill ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 9,165 3,509 Other Intangible Assets, netÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 1,249 180 TOTAL ASSETS ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ $27,897 $17,634 LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS' EQUITY Current Liabilities Medical Costs Payable ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ $ 5,541 $ 4,152 Accounts Payable and Accrued Liabilities ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 2,149 1,575 Other Policy Liabilities ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 1,965 2,117 Commercial Paper and Current Maturities of Long-Term Debt ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 150 229 Unearned Premiums ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 762 695 Total Current Liabilities ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 10,567 8,768 Long-Term Debt, less current maturities ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 3,750 1,750 Future Policy BeneÑts for Life and Annuity ContractsÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 1,642 1,517 Deferred Income Taxes and Other Liabilities ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 871 471 Commitments and Contingencies (Note 12) Shareholders' Equity Common Stock, $0.01 par value Ì 1,500 shares authorized; 654 and 583 issued and outstanding ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 7 6 Additional Paid-In Capital ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 4,179 58 Retained Earnings ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 6,745 4,915 Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income: Net Unrealized Gains on Investments, net of tax eÅects ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 136 149 Total Shareholders' Equity ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 11,067 5,128 TOTAL LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS' EQUITY ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ $27,897 $17,634 See notes to condensed consolidated Ñnancial statements 3
  4. 4. UNITEDHEALTH GROUP CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS (Unaudited) (In millions, except per share data) Three Months Ended Nine Months Ended September 30, September 30, 2004 2003 2004 2003 REVENUES Premiums ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ $8,920 $6,395 $23,985 $18,791 Services ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 842 780 2,444 2,329 Investment and Other Income ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 97 63 278 180 Total RevenuesÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 9,859 7,238 26,707 21,300 MEDICAL AND OPERATING COSTS Medical CostsÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 7,180 5,174 19,375 15,333 Operating Costs ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 1,488 1,226 4,151 3,620 Depreciation and Amortization ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 99 75 268 222 Total Medical and Operating Costs ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 8,767 6,475 23,794 19,175 EARNINGS FROM OPERATIONS ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 1,092 763 2,913 2,125 Interest ExpenseÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ (34) (24) (86) (71) EARNINGS BEFORE INCOME TAXES ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 1,058 739 2,827 2,054 Provision for Income Taxes ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ (360) (263) (979) (736) NET EARNINGS ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ $ 698 $ 476 $ 1,848 $ 1,318 BASIC NET EARNINGS PER COMMON SHARE ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ $ 1.09 $ 0.81 $ 2.99 $ 2.23 DILUTED NET EARNINGS PER COMMON SHAREÏÏÏÏ $ 1.04 $ 0.77 $ 2.85 $ 2.13 BASIC WEIGHTED-AVERAGE NUMBER OF COMMON SHARES OUTSTANDING ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 641 589 618 592 DILUTIVE EFFECT OF OUTSTANDING STOCK OPTIONSÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 29 28 30 28 DILUTED WEIGHTED-AVERAGE NUMBER OF COMMON SHARES OUTSTANDING ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 670 617 648 620 See notes to condensed consolidated Ñnancial statements 4
  5. 5. UNITEDHEALTH GROUP CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS (Unaudited) (In millions) Nine Months Ended September 30, 2004 2003 OPERATING ACTIVITIES Net Earnings ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ $1,848 $1,318 Noncash Items: Depreciation and Amortization ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 268 222 Deferred Income Taxes and Other ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 25 28 Net Change in Other Operating Items, net of eÅects from acquisitions and changes in AARP balances: Accounts Receivable and Other AssetsÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ (31) (17) Medical Costs Payable ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 335 291 Accounts Payable and Other Accrued LiabilitiesÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 606 430 Unearned Premiums ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ (166) (139) Cash Flows From Operating Activities ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 2,885 2,133 INVESTING ACTIVITIES Cash Paid for Acquisitions, net of cash assumed and other eÅects ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ (1,912) (87) Purchases of Property, Equipment and Capitalized Software ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ (240) (281) Purchases of Investments ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ (2,076) (1,927) Maturities and Sales of Investments ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 2,420 2,267 Cash Flows Used For Investing Activities ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ (1,808) (28) FINANCING ACTIVITIES Proceeds from Common Stock Issuances ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 440 214 Common Stock Repurchases ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ (2,098) (1,362) Repayments of Commercial Paper, net ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ (79) (461) Proceeds from Issuances of Long-Term Debt ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 2,000 450 Other ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 33 (9) Cash Flows From (Used For) Financing Activities ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 296 (1,168) INCREASE IN CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 1,373 937 CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS, BEGINNING OF PERIOD ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 2,262 1,130 CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS, END OF PERIOD ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ $3,635 $2,067 Supplementary schedule of noncash investing activities: Common stock issued for acquisitionsÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ $5,557 $ Ì See notes to condensed consolidated Ñnancial statements 5
  6. 6. UNITEDHEALTH GROUP NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Unaudited) 1. Basis of Presentation and Use of Estimates Unless the context otherwise requires, the use of the terms the quot;quot;Company,'' quot;quot;we,'' quot;quot;us,'' and quot;quot;our'' in the following refers to UnitedHealth Group Incorporated and its subsidiaries. The accompanying unaudited condensed consolidated Ñnancial statements reÖect all adjustments, consisting solely of normal recurring adjustments, needed to present the Ñnancial results for these interim periods fairly. In accordance with the rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission, we have omitted certain footnote disclosures that would substantially duplicate the disclosures contained in our annual audited Ñnancial statements. Read together with the disclosures below, we believe the interim Ñnancial statements are presented fairly. However, these unaudited condensed consolidated Ñnancial statements should be read together with the consolidated Ñnancial statements and the notes included in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2003. These consolidated Ñnancial statements include certain amounts that are based on our best estimates and judgments. These estimates require us to apply complex assumptions and judgments, often because we must make estimates about the eÅects of matters that are inherently uncertain and will change in subsequent periods. The most signiÑcant estimates relate to medical costs, medical costs payable, revenues, contingent liabilities, and asset valuations, allowances and impairments. We adjust these estimates each period, as more current information becomes available, and any adjustment could have a signiÑcant impact on our consoli- dated operating results. The impact of any changes in estimates is included in the determination of earnings in the period in which the estimate is adjusted. 2. Stock-Based Compensation We account for activity under our stock-based employee compensation plans under the recognition and measurement principles of Accounting Principles Board Opinion No. 25, quot;quot;Accounting for Stock Issued to Employees.'' Accordingly, we do not recognize compensation expense when we grant employee stock options because we grant stock options at exercise prices not less than the fair value of our common stock on the date of grant. The following table shows the eÅect on net earnings and earnings per share had we applied the fair value expense recognition provisions of Statement of Financial Accounting Standards (FAS) No. 123, quot;quot;Accounting for Stock-Based Compensation,'' to stock-based employee compensation (in millions, except per share data). Three Months Nine Months Ended Ended September 30, September 30, 2004 2003 2004 2003 NET EARNINGS As Reported ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ $ 698 $ 476 $1,848 $1,318 Compensation Expense, net of tax eÅect ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ (31) (32) (95) (92) Pro FormaÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ $ 667 $ 444 $1,753 $1,226 BASIC NET EARNINGS PER COMMON SHARE As Reported ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ $1.09 $0.81 $ 2.99 $ 2.23 Pro FormaÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ $1.04 $0.75 $ 2.83 $ 2.07 DILUTED NET EARNINGS PER COMMON SHARE As Reported ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ $1.04 $0.77 $ 2.85 $ 2.13 Pro FormaÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ $1.00 $0.72 $ 2.71 $ 1.98 6
  7. 7. UNITEDHEALTH GROUP NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Ì (Continued) 3. Acquisitions On July 29, 2004, our Health Care Services business segment acquired Oxford Health Plans, Inc. (Oxford). Oxford provides health care and beneÑt services for individuals and employers, principally in New York City, northern New Jersey and southern Connecticut. This merger signiÑcantly strengthens our market position in this region and provides substantial distribution opportunities for our other UnitedHealth Group businesses. Under the terms of the purchase agreement, Oxford shareholders received 0.6357 shares of UnitedHealth Group common stock and $16.17 in cash for each share of Oxford common stock they owned. Total consideration issued was approximately $5.0 billion, comprised of approximately 52.2 million shares of UnitedHealth Group common stock (valued at approximately $3.4 billion based upon the average of UnitedHealth Group's share closing price for two days before, the day of and two days after the acquisition announcement date of April 26, 2004), approximately $1.3 billion in cash and UnitedHealth Group vested common stock options with an estimated fair value of $240 million issued in exchange for Oxford's outstanding vested common stock options. The purchase price and costs associated with the acquisition exceeded the preliminary estimated fair value of the net tangible assets acquired by approximately $4.1 billion. We have preliminarily allocated the excess purchase price over the fair value of the net tangible assets acquired to Ñnite-lived intangible assets of $735 million and associated deferred tax liabilities of $277 million, and goodwill of approximately $3.7 billion. The Ñnite-lived intangible assets consist primarily of member lists and health care physician and hospital networks, with an estimated weighted-average useful life of 15 years. The acquired goodwill is not deductible for income tax purposes. Our preliminary estimate of the fair value of the tangible assets/(liabilities) as of the acquisition date, which is subject to further reÑnement, is as follows: (in millions Ì unaudited) Cash, Cash Equivalents and InvestmentsÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ $1,680 Accounts Receivable and Other Current Assets ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 169 Property, Equipment, Capitalized Software and Other Assets ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 37 Medical Costs Payable ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ (713) Other Current Liabilities ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ (317) Net Tangible Assets AcquiredÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ $ 856 On February 10, 2004, our Health Care Services business segment acquired Mid Atlantic Medical Services, Inc. (MAMSI). MAMSI oÅers a broad range of health care coverage and related administrative services for individuals and employers in the mid-Atlantic region of the United States. This merger signiÑcantly strengthens UnitedHealthcare's market position in the mid-Atlantic region and provides substantial distribu- tion opportunities for other UnitedHealth Group businesses. Under the terms of the purchase agreement, MAMSI shareholders received 0.82 shares of UnitedHealth Group common stock and $18 in cash for each share of MAMSI common stock they owned. Total consideration issued was approximately $2.7 billion, comprised of 36.4 million shares of UnitedHealth Group common stock (valued at $1.9 billion based on the average of UnitedHealth Group's share closing price for two days before, the day of and two days after the acquisition announcement date of October 27, 2003) and $800 million in cash. The purchase price and costs associated with the acquisition exceeded the preliminary estimated fair value of the net tangible assets acquired by approximately $2.1 billion. We have preliminarily allocated the excess purchase price over the fair value of the net tangible assets acquired to Ñnite-lived intangible assets of $360 million and associated deferred tax liabilities of $126 million, and goodwill of approximately $1.9 billion. The Ñnite-lived intangible assets consist primarily of member lists and health care physician and hospital networks, with an estimated weighted-average useful life of 19 years. The acquired goodwill is not deductible for income tax purposes. Our 7
  8. 8. UNITEDHEALTH GROUP NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Ì (Continued) preliminary estimate of the fair value of the tangible assets/(liabilities) as of the acquisition date, which is subject to further reÑnement, is as follows: (in millions Ì unaudited) Cash, Cash Equivalents and Investments ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ $736 Accounts Receivable and Other Current Assets ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 228 Property, Equipment, Capitalized Software and Other Assets ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 89 Medical Costs Payable ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ (297) Other Current LiabilitiesÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ (132) Net Tangible Assets Acquired ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ $624 The results of operations and Ñnancial condition of Oxford and MAMSI have been included in our Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations and Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets since the acquisition date. The unaudited pro forma Ñnancial information presented below assumes that the acquisitions of Oxford and MAMSI had occurred as of the beginning of each respective period presented below. The pro forma adjustments include the pro forma eÅect of UnitedHealth Group shares issued in the acquisitions, the amortization of Ñnite-lived intangible assets arising from the preliminary purchase price allocations, interest expense related to Ñnancing the cash portion of the purchase price and the associated income tax eÅects of the pro forma adjustments. Because the unaudited pro forma Ñnancial information has been prepared based on preliminary estimates of fair values, the actual amounts recorded as of the completion of the purchase price allocation may diÅer materially from the information presented below. The unaudited pro forma results have been prepared for comparative purposes only and do not purport to be indicative of the results of operations that would have occurred had the Oxford and MAMSI acquisitions been consummated at the beginning of the respective periods. For the Three For the Nine Months Ended Months Ended September 30, September 30, Proforma Ì unaudited 2004 2003 2004 2003 (In millions, except per share data) RevenuesÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ $10,302 $9,239 $30,262 $27,269 Net Earnings ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ $ 719 $ 611 $ 2,037 $ 1,627 Earnings Per Share Basic ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ $ 1.09 $ 0.90 $ 3.07 $ 2.39 Diluted ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ $ 1.05 $ 0.86 $ 2.94 $ 2.29 4. Cash, Cash Equivalents and Investments As of September 30, 2004, the amortized cost, gross unrealized gains and losses, and fair value of cash, cash equivalents and investments were as follows (in millions): Gross Gross Amortized Unrealized Unrealized Fair Cost Gains Losses Value Cash and Cash Equivalents ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ $ 3,635 $Ì $Ì $ 3,635 Debt Securities Ì Available for Sale ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 8,334 213 (14) 8,533 Equity Securities Ì Available for SaleÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 182 9 (2) 189 Debt Securities Ì Held to MaturityÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 143 Ì Ì 143 Total Cash and Investments ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ $12,294 $222 $(16) $12,500 8
  9. 9. UNITEDHEALTH GROUP NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Ì (Continued) During the three and nine month periods ended September 30, we recorded realized gains and losses on the sale of investments, excluding the UnitedHealth Capital dispositions described below, as follows (in millions): Three Months Nine Months Ended Ended September 30, September 30, 2004 2003 2004 2003 Gross Realized Gains ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ $6 $13 $26 $35 Gross Realized LossesÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ (6) (5) (11) (21) Net Realized Gains ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ $Ì $8 $15 $14 In addition, during the Ñrst quarter of 2004, we realized a capital gain of $25 million on the sale of certain UnitedHealth Capital investments. With the proceeds from this sale, we made a cash contribution of $25 million to the United Health Foundation in the Ñrst quarter of 2004. The realized gain of $25 million and the related contribution expense of $25 million are included in Investment and Other Income in the accompanying Condensed Consolidated Statement of Operations. 5. Goodwill and Other Intangible Assets Changes in the carrying amount of goodwill, by operating segment, for the nine months ended September 30, 2004 and 2003, were as follows (in millions): Health Specialized Care Care Consolidated Services Uniprise Services Ingenix Total Balance at December 31, 2003ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ $1,770 $698 $409 $632 $3,509 Acquisitions and Subsequent Payments ÏÏ 5,630 Ì Ì 26 5,656 Balance at September 30, 2004 ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ $7,400 $698 $409 $658 $9,165 Health Specialized Care Care Consolidated Services Uniprise Services Ingenix Total Balance at December 31, 2002ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ $1,693 $698 $363 $609 $3,363 Acquisitions and Subsequent Payments ÏÏ 12 Ì 38 11 61 Balance at September 30, 2003 ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ $1,705 $698 $401 $620 $3,424 The weighted-average useful life, gross carrying value, accumulated amortization and net carrying value of other intangible assets as of September 30, 2004 and December 31, 2003 were as follows (in millions): September 30, 2004 December 31, 2003 Weighted- Gross Net Gross Net Average Carrying Accumulated Carrying Carrying Accumulated Carrying Useful Life Value Amortization Value Value Amortization Value Customer Contracts and Membership Lists ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 16 years $1,174 $(31) $1,143 $ 93 $ (6) $ 87 Patents, Trademarks and Technology ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 9 years 64 (31) 33 73 (26) 47 Other ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 11 years 91 (18) 73 57 (11) 46 Total ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 14 years $1,329 $(80) $1,249 $223 $(43) $180 Amortization expense relating to other intangible assets was $18 million and $37 million for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2004 and $5 million and $13 million for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2003. 9
  10. 10. UNITEDHEALTH GROUP NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Ì (Continued) Estimated amortization expense for the years ending December 31 relating to other intangible assets included in the September 30, 2004 Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets is as follows (in millions): 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 $60 $93 $92 $89 $87 6. Medical Costs and Medical Costs Payable Medical costs and medical costs payable include estimates of our obligations for medical care services that have been rendered on behalf of insured consumers but for which claims have either not yet been received or processed, and estimates of liabilities for physician, hospital and other medical cost disputes. We develop estimates for medical costs incurred but not reported using an actuarial process that is consistently applied, centrally controlled and automated. The actuarial models consider factors such as time from date of service to claim receipt, claim backlogs, care provider contract rate changes, medical care consumption and other medical cost trends. Each period, we re-examine previously established medical costs payable estimates based on actual claim submissions and other changes in facts and circumstances. As the liability estimates recorded in prior periods become more exact, we increase or decrease the amount of the estimates, with the changes in estimates included in medical costs in the period in which the change is identiÑed. In every reporting period, our operating results include the eÅects of more completely developed medical costs payable estimates associated with previously reported periods. Medical costs for the three months ended September 30, 2004 include approximately $50 million of favorable medical cost development related to prior Ñscal years and approximately $50 million of favorable medical cost development related to the Ñrst and second quarters of 2004. Medical costs for the three months ended September 30, 2003 include approximately $20 million of favorable medical cost development related to prior Ñscal years and approximately $80 million of favorable medical cost development related to the Ñrst and second quarters of 2003. Medical costs for the nine months ended September 30, 2004 and 2003 include approximately $200 million and $130 million, respectively, of favorable medical cost development related to prior years. Management believes the amount of medical costs payable is reasonable and adequate to cover the Company's liability for unpaid claims as of September 30, 2004. 10
  11. 11. UNITEDHEALTH GROUP NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Ì (Continued) 7. Commercial Paper and Debt Commercial paper and debt consisted of the following (in millions): September 30, 2004 December 31, 2003 Carrying Fair Carrying Fair Value Value Value Value Commercial Paper ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ $ Ì $ Ì $ 79 $ 79 Floating-Rate Notes due November 2004ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 150 150 150 150 7.5% Senior Unsecured Notes due November 2005ÏÏÏÏÏÏ 400 422 400 438 5.2% Senior Unsecured Notes due January 2007 ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 400 417 400 427 3.4% Senior Unsecured Notes due August 2007 ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 550 549 Ì Ì 3.3% Senior Unsecured Notes due January 2008 ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 500 497 500 499 3.8% Senior Unsecured Notes due February 2009 ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 250 249 Ì Ì 4.1% Senior Unsecured Notes due August 2009 ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 450 454 Ì Ì 4.9% Senior Unsecured Notes due April 2013 ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 450 456 450 454 4.8% Senior Unsecured Notes due February 2014 ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 250 250 Ì Ì 5.0% Senior Unsecured Notes due August 2014 ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 500 507 Ì Ì Total Commercial Paper and Debt ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 3,900 3,951 1,979 2,047 Less Current Maturities ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ (150) (150) (229) (229) Long-Term Debt, less current maturities ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ $3,750 $3,801 $1,750 $1,818 In July 2004, we issued $1.2 billion of commercial paper to fund the cash portion of the Oxford purchase price. In August 2004, we reÑnanced the commercial paper by issuing $550 million of 3.4% Ñxed-rate notes due August 2007, $450 million of 4.1% Ñxed-rate notes due August 2009 and $500 million of 5.0% Ñxed-rate notes due August 2014. In February 2004, we issued $250 million of 3.8% Ñxed-rate notes due February 2009 and $250 million of 4.8% Ñxed-rate notes due February 2014 to Ñnance a majority of the cash portion of the MAMSI purchase price. In December 2003, we issued $500 million of 3.3% Ñxed-rate notes due January 2008, and in March 2003, we issued $450 million of 4.9% Ñxed-rate notes due April 2013. We used the proceeds from these borrowings to repay commercial paper and term debt maturing in 2003, and for general corporate purposes including working capital, business acquisitions and share repurchases. We have interest rate swap agreements that qualify as fair value hedges to convert the majority of our interest rate exposure from a Ñxed to a variable rate. The interest rate swap agreements have aggregate notional amounts of $2.9 billion with variable rates that are benchmarked to the six-month LIBOR rate. At September 30, 2004, the rates used to accrue interest expense on these agreements ranged from 2.1% to 2.7%. The diÅerential between the Ñxed and variable rates to be paid or received is accrued and recognized over the life of the agreements as an adjustment to interest expense in the Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations. The interest rates on our November 2004 Öoating-rate notes are reset quarterly to the three-month LIBOR (London Interbank OÅered Rate) plus 0.6%. As of September 30, 2004, the applicable rate on the notes was 2.3%. In June 2004, we executed a credit arrangement for a $1 billion Ñve-year revolving credit facility to support our commercial paper program. This credit facility replaced our $450 million revolving facility that was set to expire in July 2005, and our $450 million, 364-day facility that was set to expire in July 2004. In June 2004, we also executed a credit arrangement for a $1.5 billion 364-day bridge facility. The bridge facility was used to support the issuance of commercial paper to fund the cash portion of the Oxford purchase price in July 2004. The bridge facility was terminated in August 2004 in conjunction with the reÑnancing of the commercial paper discussed above. As of September 30, 2004, we had no amounts outstanding under these credit facilities. 11
  12. 12. UNITEDHEALTH GROUP NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Ì (Continued) Our debt arrangements and credit facilities contain various covenants, the most restrictive of which require us to maintain a debt-to-total-capital ratio below 45% and to exceed speciÑed minimum interest coverage levels. We are in compliance with the requirements of all debt covenants. 8. AARP In January 1998, we initiated a 10-year contract to provide health insurance products and services to members of AARP. Under the terms of the contract, we are compensated for transaction processing and other services as well as for assuming underwriting risk. We are also engaged in product development activities to complement the insurance oÅerings under this program. Premium revenues from our portion of the AARP insurance oÅerings are approximately $4.5 billion annually. The underwriting gains or losses related to the AARP business are directly recorded as an increase or decrease to a rate stabilization fund (RSF). The primary components of the underwriting results are premium revenue, medical costs, investment income, administrative expenses, member services expenses, marketing expenses and premium taxes. Underwriting gains and losses are recorded as an increase or decrease to the RSF and accrue to AARP policyholders, unless cumulative net losses were to exceed the balance in the RSF. To the extent underwriting losses exceed the balance in the RSF, we would have to fund the deÑcit. Any deÑcit we fund could be recovered by underwriting gains in future periods of the contract. To date, we have not been required to fund any underwriting deÑcits. The RSF balance is reported in Other Policy Liabilities in the accompanying Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets. We believe the RSF balance is suÇcient to cover potential future underwriting or other risks associated with the contract. The following AARP program-related assets and liabilities are included in our Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets (in millions): Balance as of September 30, December 31, 2004 2003 Accounts Receivable ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ $ 382 $ 352 Assets Under ManagementÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ $1,921 $1,959 Medical Costs Payable ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ $ 888 $ 874 Other Policy Liabilities ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ $1,230 $1,275 Other Current Liabilities ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ $ 185 $ 162 The eÅects of changes in balance sheet amounts associated with the AARP program accrue to AARP policyholders through the RSF balance. Accordingly, we do not include the eÅect of such changes in our Condensed Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows. Pursuant to our agreement, AARP assets under management are managed separately from our general investment portfolio and are used to pay costs associated with the AARP program. These assets are invested at our discretion, within investment guidelines approved by AARP. Interest earnings and realized investment gains and losses on these assets accrue to AARP policyholders through the RSF. As such, they are not included in our earnings. Assets under management are reported at their fair market value, and unrealized gains and losses are included directly in the RSF associated with the AARP program. As of September 30, 2004 and December 31, 2003, the amortized cost, gross unrealized gains and losses, and fair value of cash, 12
  13. 13. UNITEDHEALTH GROUP NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Ì (Continued) cash equivalents and investments associated with the AARP insurance program, included in Assets Under Management, were as follows (in millions): Gross Gross Amortized Unrealized Unrealized Fair September 30, 2004 Cost Gains Losses Value Cash and Cash Equivalents ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ $ 208 $Ì $Ì $ 208 Debt Securities Ì Available for Sale ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 1,663 52 (2) 1,713 Total Cash and Investments ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ $1,871 $52 $(2) $1,921 Gross Gross Amortized Unrealized Unrealized Fair December 31, 2003 Cost Gains Losses Value Cash and Cash Equivalents ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ $ 218 $Ì $Ì $ 218 Debt Securities Ì Available for Sale ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 1,655 86 Ì 1,741 Total Cash and Investments ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ $1,873 $86 $Ì $1,959 As of September 30, 2004 and December 31, 2003, respectively, debt securities consisted of $770 million and $711 million in U.S. Government and Agency obligations, $20 million and $16 million in state and municipal obligations and $923 million and $1,014 million in investment grade corporate obligations. At September 30, 2004 and December 31, 2003, respectively, debt securities with maturities of less than one year totaled $81 million and $52 million, debt securities maturing in one to Ñve years totaled $973 million and $1,404 million, debt securities maturing in Ñve to 10 years totaled $413 million and $160 million and debt securities with maturities more than 10 years totaled $246 million and $125 million. 9. Stock Repurchase Program Under our board of directors' authorization, we maintain a common stock repurchase program. Repurchases may be made from time to time at prevailing prices, subject to restrictions on volume, pricing and timing. During the nine months ended September 30, 2004, we repurchased 33.7 million shares through this program at an average price of approximately $63 per share and at an aggregate cost of $2.1 billion. In November 2004, the board of directors renewed the stock repurchase program. The Company is currently authorized to repurchase up to 65 million shares of common stock under the program. 10. Comprehensive Income The table below presents comprehensive income, deÑned as changes in the equity of our business excluding changes resulting from investments by and distributions to our shareholders, for the three and nine month periods ended September 30 (in millions): Three Months Nine Months Ended Ended September 30, September 30, 2004 2003 2004 2003 Net Earnings ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ $698 $476 $1,848 $1,318 Change in Net Unrealized Gains on Investments, net of tax effects ÏÏ 99 (29) (13) 8 Comprehensive Income ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ $797 $447 $1,835 $1,326 13
  14. 14. UNITEDHEALTH GROUP NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Ì (Continued) 11. Segment Financial Information The following is a description of the types of products and services from which each of our business segments derives its revenues: ‚ Health Care Services consists of the UnitedHealthcare, Ovations and AmeriChoice businesses. UnitedHealthcare coordinates network-based health and well-being services on behalf of local employers and consumers. Ovations delivers health and well-being services for Americans over the age of 50. AmeriChoice facilitates and manages health care services for state Medicaid programs and their beneÑ- ciaries. The Ñnancial results of UnitedHealthcare, Ovations and AmeriChoice have been combined in the Health Care Services segment column in the tables presented below because these businesses have similar economic characteristics and have similar products and services, types of customers, distribution methods and operational processes, and operate in a similar regulatory environment, typically within the same legal entity. ‚ Uniprise provides network-based health and well-being access and services, business-to-business transaction processing services, consumer connectivity and technology support services to large employers and health plans. ‚ Specialized Care Services is a portfolio of health and well-being companies, each serving a specialized market need with an oÅering of beneÑts, networks, services and resources. ‚ Ingenix is a leader in the Ñeld of health care information serving pharmaceutical, biotechnology and medical device companies, health insurers and other payers, physicians and other health care providers, large employers and government agencies. Transactions between business segments principally consist of customer service and transaction processing services Uniprise provides to Health Care Services, certain product oÅerings sold to Uniprise and Health Care Services customers by Specialized Care Services, and sales of medical beneÑts cost, quality and utilization data and predictive modeling to Health Care Services and Uniprise by Ingenix. These transactions are recorded at management's best estimate of fair value, as if the services were purchased from or sold to third parties. All intersegment transactions are eliminated in consolidation. Assets and liabilities that are jointly used are assigned to each segment using estimates of pro-rata usage. Cash and investments are assigned such that each segment has minimum speciÑed levels of regulatory capital or working capital for non-regulated businesses. The quot;quot;Eliminations'' column includes eliminations of inter-segment transactions. 14
  15. 15. UNITEDHEALTH GROUP NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Ì (Continued) The following table presents segment Ñnancial information for the three and nine month periods ended September 30, 2004 and 2003 (in millions): Health Specialized Care Care Three Months Ended September 30, 2004 Services Uniprise Services Ingenix Eliminations Consolidated Revenues Ì External Customers ÏÏ $ 8,627 $ 676 $ 346 $113 $ Ì $ 9,762 Revenues Ì Intersegment ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ Ì 159 229 57 (445) Ì Investment and Other Income ÏÏÏÏ 85 7 5 Ì Ì 97 Total Revenues ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ $ 8,712 $ 842 $ 580 $170 $ (445) $ 9,859 Earnings from Operations ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ $ 763 $ 171 $ 124 $ 34 $ Ì $ 1,092 Health Specialized Care Care Three Months Ended September 30, 2003 Services Uniprise Services Ingenix Eliminations Consolidated Revenues Ì External Customers ÏÏ $ 6,173 $ 625 $ 273 $104 $ Ì $ 7,175 Revenues Ì Intersegment ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ Ì 145 199 44 (388) Ì Investment and Other Income ÏÏÏÏ 51 8 4 Ì Ì 63 Total Revenues ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ $ 6,224 $ 778 $ 476 $148 $ (388) $ 7,238 Earnings from Operations ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ $ 490 $ 154 $ 100 $ 19 $ Ì $ 763 Health Specialized Care Care Nine Months Ended September 30, 2004 Services Uniprise Services Ingenix Eliminations Consolidated Revenues Ì External Customers ÏÏ $23,108 $2,013 $1,012 $296 $ Ì $26,429 Revenues Ì Intersegment ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ Ì 485 681 160 (1,326) Ì Investment and Other Income ÏÏÏÏ 242 22 14 Ì Ì 278 Total Revenues ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ $23,350 $2,520 $1,707 $456 $(1,326) $26,707 Earnings from Operations ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ $ 1,976 $ 508 $ 356 $ 73 $ Ì $ 2,913 Health Specialized Care Care Nine Months Ended September 30, 2003 Services Uniprise Services Ingenix Eliminations Consolidated Revenues Ì External Customers ÏÏ $18,196 $1,865 $ 790 $269 $ Ì $21,120 Revenues Ì Intersegment ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ Ì 436 592 126 (1,154) Ì Investment and Other Income ÏÏÏÏ 148 21 11 Ì Ì 180 Total Revenues ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ $18,344 $2,322 $1,393 $395 $(1,154) $21,300 Earnings from Operations ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ $ 1,342 $ 459 $ 281 $ 43 $ Ì $ 2,125 12. Commitments and Contingencies Legal Matters Because of the nature of our businesses, we are routinely made party to a variety of legal actions related to the design, management and oÅerings of our services. We record liabilities for our estimates of probable costs resulting from these matters. These matters include, but are not limited to, claims relating to health care beneÑts coverage, medical malpractice actions, contract disputes and claims related to disclosure of certain business practices. Following the events of September 11, 2001, the cost of business insurance coverage 15
  16. 16. UNITEDHEALTH GROUP NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Ì (Continued) increased signiÑcantly. As a result, we have increased the amount of risk that we self-insure, particularly with respect to matters incidental to our business. In 1999, a number of class action lawsuits were Ñled against us and virtually all major entities in the health beneÑts business. Generally, the suits are purported class actions on behalf of physicians for alleged breaches of federal statutes, including the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974, as amended (ERISA), and the Racketeer InÖuenced Corrupt Organization Act (RICO). The suits seek injunctive, compensatory and equitable relief as well as restitution, costs, fees and interest payments. All activity in the trial court has been stayed pending the industry defendants' appeal of an arbitration order. In March 2000, the American Medical Association Ñled a lawsuit against the Company in connection with the calculation of reasonable and customary reimbursement rates for non-network providers. The suit seeks declaratory, injunctive and compensatory relief as well as costs, fees and interest payments. An amended complaint was Ñled on August 25, 2000, which alleged two classes of plaintiÅs, an ERISA class and a non- ERISA class. After the court dismissed certain ERISA claims and the claims brought by the American Medical Association, a third amended complaint was Ñled. On October 25, 2002, the court granted in part and denied in part our motion to dismiss the third amended complaint. We are engaged in discovery in this matter. Although the results of pending litigation are always uncertain, we do not believe the results of any such actions currently threatened or pending, including those described above, will, individually or in aggregate, have a material adverse eÅect on our consolidated Ñnancial position or results of operations. Government Regulation Our business is regulated at federal, state, local and international levels. The laws and rules governing our business and interpretations of those laws and rules are subject to frequent change. Broad latitude is given to the agencies administering those regulations. State legislatures and Congress continue to focus on health care issues as the subject of proposed legislation. Existing or future laws and rules could force us to change how we do business, restrict revenue and enrollment growth, increase our health care and administrative costs and capital requirements, and increase our liability in federal and state courts for coverage determinations, contract interpretation and other actions. Further, we must obtain and maintain regulatory approvals to market many of our products. We are regularly subject to routine, regular and special governmental audits, investigations and enforcement actions. In addition, a state Department of Insurance or other state or federal authority (including CMS, the OÇce of the Inspector General, the OÇce of Personnel Management, the OÇce of Civil Rights, the Department of Justice, and state attorneys general) may from time to time begin a special audit of one of our health plans, our insurance plans or one of our other operations to investigate issues such as utilization management; Ñnancial, eligibility or other data reporting; prompt claims payment; or coverage determinations for medical services, including emergency room care. Any such government actions can result in assessment of damages, civil or criminal Ñnes or penalties, or other sanctions, including loss of licensure or exclusion from participation in government programs. We record liabilities for our estimate of probable costs resulting from these matters. Although the results of pending matters are always uncertain, we do not believe the results of any of the current investigations, audits or reviews, individually or in the aggregate, will have a material adverse eÅect on our consolidated Ñnancial position or results of operations. Other Contingencies In 2002, Oxford Health Plans, Inc. (Oxford), which we acquired on July 29, 2004, entered into agreements with two insurance companies that guaranteed cost reduction targets related to certain orthopedic medical services. In 2003, the insurers sought to rescind or terminate the agreements claiming various misrepresenta- tions and material breaches of the agreements by Oxford. Pursuant to the agreements, Oxford has Ñled claims 16
  17. 17. UNITEDHEALTH GROUP NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS Ì (Continued) to recover $25 million of costs incurred and expensed in excess of the cost reduction targets for the period from November 2002 to October 2003. Oxford also anticipates it will Ñle additional claims of $25 million for costs incurred and expensed in excess of the cost reduction targets for the period from November 2003 to October 2004. Both insurers have commenced arbitrations. An arbitration hearing is scheduled for 2005. We believe the insurers' claims are without merit and we will vigorously seek to enforce our rights. 13. Recently Issued Accounting Standards In January 2003, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) issued Interpretation (FIN) No. 46, quot;quot;Consolidation of Variable Interest Entities Ì an Interpretation of ARB No. 51.'' FIN No. 46, as revised in December 2003, requires an enterprise to consolidate a variable interest entity if that enterprise has a variable interest that will absorb a majority of the entity's expected losses, receive a majority of the entity's expected residual returns, or both. The adoption of FIN No. 46 did not have any impact on our consolidated Ñnancial position or results of operations. In March 2004, the FASB issued an exposure draft of a proposed standard entitled quot;quot;Share Based Payment'', which would amend FAS No. 123, quot;quot;Accounting for Stock-Based Compensation,'' and FAS No. 95, quot;quot;Statement of Cash Flows.'' The proposed standard, if adopted, would require expensing stock options issued by the Company based on their estimated fair value at the date of grant and would be eÅective for the third quarter of 2005. Upon issuance of a Ñnal standard, which is expected in late 2004, the Company will evaluate the impact on our consolidated Ñnancial position and results of operations. In March 2004, the FASB issued EITF Issue No. 03-1 (quot;quot;EITF 03-1''), quot;quot;The Meaning of Other-Than Temporary Impairment and its Application to Certain Investments.'' EITF 03-1 includes new guidance for evaluating and recording impairment losses on certain debt and equity investments when the fair value of the investment security is less than its carrying value. The provisions of this rule are required to be applied prospectively to all current and future investments accounted for in accordance with FAS No. 115, quot;quot;Accounting for Certain Investments in Debt and Equity Securities,'' and other cost method investments beginning in the third quarter of 2004. In September 2004, the FASB delayed the eÅective date for the measurement and recognition provisions until the issuance of additional implementation guidance, expected in December 2004. The Company is currently evaluating the impact of this new accounting standard on its process for determining other-than-temporary impairments of applicable debt and equity securities. 17
  18. 18. REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM To the Board of Directors and Shareholders UnitedHealth Group Incorporated Minnetonka, Minnesota We have reviewed the accompanying condensed consolidated balance sheet of UnitedHealth Group Incorpo- rated and Subsidiaries (the Company) as of September 30, 2004, and the related condensed consolidated statements of operations for the three-month and nine-month periods ended September 30, 2004 and 2003, and of cash Öows for the nine-month periods ended September 30, 2004 and 2003. These condensed consolidated Ñnancial statements are the responsibility of the Company's management. We conducted our review in accordance with standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). A review of interim Ñnancial information consists principally of applying analytical procedures and making inquiries of persons responsible for Ñnancial and accounting matters. It is substantially less in scope than an audit conducted in accordance with standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States), the objective of which is the expression of an opinion regarding the Ñnancial statements taken as a whole. Accordingly, we do not express such an opinion. Based on our review, we are not aware of any material modiÑcations that should be made to such condensed consolidated Ñnancial statements for them to be in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America. We have previously audited, in accordance with standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States), the consolidated balance sheet of UnitedHealth Group Incorporated and Subsidiaries as of December 31, 2003, and the related consolidated statements of operations, shareholders' equity, and cash Öows for the year then ended (not presented herein); and in our report dated February 10, 2004, we expressed an unqualiÑed opinion on those consolidated Ñnancial statements. In our opinion, the information set forth in the accompanying condensed consolidated balance sheet as of December 31, 2003 is fairly stated, in all material respects, in relation to the consolidated balance sheet from which it has been derived. /s/ DELOITTE & TOUCHE LLP Minneapolis, Minnesota November 5, 2004 18
  19. 19. Item 2. Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations The following discussion should be read together with the accompanying unaudited condensed consolidated Ñnancial statements and notes. In addition, the following discussion should be considered in light of a number of factors that aÅect the Company, the industry in which we operate, and business generally. These factors are described in the Cautionary Statements section of this Quarterly Report. Summary highlights of our third quarter 2004 results include: ‚ Diluted net earnings per common share of $1.04, an increase of 35% from $0.77 per share reported in the third quarter of 2003 and an increase of 12% from $0.93 per share reported in the second quarter of 2004. ‚ Consolidated revenues of approximately $9.9 billion increased $2.6 billion, or 36%, over the third quarter of 2003. Excluding the impact of acquisitions, consolidated revenues increased by approximately 8% over the prior year. ‚ Earnings from operations of $1.1 billion, up $329 million, or 43%, over the prior year and up $147 million, or 16%, sequentially over the second quarter of 2004. ‚ Consolidated operating margin of 11.1% improved from 10.5% in the third quarter of 2003. ‚ Cash Öows from operations of nearly $2.9 billion for the nine months ended September 30, 2004, an increase of 35% compared to $2.1 billion for the nine months ended September 30, 2003. Summary Operating Information Three Months Ended Nine Months Ended September 30, September 30, Percent Percent (In millions, except per share data) 2004 2003 Change 2004 2003 Change Total Revenues ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ $9,859 $7,238 36% $26,707 $21,300 25% Earnings from OperationsÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ $1,092 $ 763 43% $ 2,913 $ 2,125 37% Net Earnings ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ $ 698 $ 476 47% $ 1,848 $ 1,318 40% Diluted Net Earnings Per Common ShareÏÏÏÏ $ 1.04 $ 0.77 35% $ 2.85 $ 2.13 34% Medical Care RatioÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 80.5% 80.9% 80.8% 81.6% Medical Care Ratio, excluding AARP ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 79.3% 79.5% 79.5% 80.3% Operating Cost Ratio ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 15.1% 16.9% 15.5% 17.0% Return on Equity (annualized) ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 30.7% 40.4% 32.3% 38.4% Operating Margin ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 11.1% 10.5% 10.9% 10.0% Results of Operations Consolidated Financial Results Revenues Revenues are comprised of premium revenues from risk-based products; service revenues, which primarily include fees for management, administrative and consulting services; and investment and other income. Premium revenues are primarily derived from risk-based health insurance arrangements in which the premium is Ñxed, typically for a one-year period, and we assume the economic risk of funding our customers' health care services and related administrative costs. Service revenues consist primarily of fees derived from services performed for customers that self-insure the medical costs of their employees and their dependents. For both premium risk-based and fee-based customer arrangements, we provide coordination and facilitation of medical services, transaction processing, customer, consumer and care provider services, and access to contracted networks of physicians, hospitals and other health care professionals. 19
  20. 20. Consolidated revenues for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2004 of $9.9 billion and $26.7 billion, respectively, increased by $2.6 billion, or 36%, and $5.4 billion, or 25%, over the comparable 2003 periods. Consolidated revenues for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2004 increased over the comparable 2003 periods by approximately 28% and 17%, respectively, as a result of revenues from businesses acquired since the third quarter of 2003 with the remaining increase due primarily to rate increases on premium and fee-based services and growth across business segments. Following is a discussion of third quarter consolidated revenue trends for each of our three revenue components. Premium Revenues Consolidated premium revenues for the three and nine month periods ended September 30, 2004 of $8.9 billion and $24.0 billion, respectively, increased by $2.5 billion, or 39%, and $5.2 billion, or 28%, over the comparable 2003 periods. Excluding the impact of acquisitions, consolidated premium revenues increased by approximately 9% for both the three and nine months ended September 30, 2004 over the comparable 2003 periods primarily driven by premium rate increases. For the three and nine months ended September 30, 2004, UnitedHealthcare premium revenues increased by $2.0 billion and $3.9 billion, respectively, due mainly to the acquisitions of Oxford, MAMSI and Golden Rule Financial Corporation (Golden Rule) since the third quarter of 2003 and average net premium rate increases of approximately 9% to 10% on UnitedHealthcare's renewing commercial risk-based business, partially oÅset by a decrease in the number of individuals served by risk-based products. Ovations premium revenues increased by approximately 22% and 16% for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2004, respectively, over the comparable 2003 periods driven by an increase in the number of individuals served by Medicare supplement products provided to AARP members and by Medicare Advantage products and the related premium rate increases as well as the acquired Oxford Medicare business. Premium revenues from AmeriChoice Medicaid programs for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2004 increased by $131 million, or 20%, and $353 million, or 19%, respectively, over the comparable 2003 periods primarily driven by an increase in the number of individuals served and the acquisition of a Medicaid health plan in Michigan in February 2004. The remaining premium revenue increase is due mainly to strong growth in several of Specialized Care Services' businesses. Service Revenues Service revenues during the three and nine months ended September 30, 2004 of $842 million and $2.4 billion, respectively, increased $62 million, or 8%, and $115 million, or 5%, over the comparable 2003 periods. The increase in service revenues was driven primarily by aggregate growth of approximately 4%, excluding the impact of acquisitions, in the number of individuals served by Uniprise and UnitedHealthcare under fee-based arrangements during the nine months ended September 30, 2004 over the comparable 2003 period, as well as annual rate increases. Investment and Other Income Investment and other income during the three and nine months ended September 30, 2004 totaled $97 million and $278 million, respectively, representing increases of $34 million and $98 million over the comparable 2003 periods. Interest income for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2004 increased by $42 million and $97 million, respectively, over the comparable 2003 periods mainly due to the impact of increased levels of cash and Ñxed-income investments from the acquisitions of Oxford, MAMSI and Golden Rule. Net capital gains on sales of investments for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2004 were zero and $15 million, respectively, compared with $8 million and $14 million for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2003. Medical Costs The combination of pricing, beneÑt designs, consumer health care utilization and comprehensive care facilitation eÅorts is reÖected in the medical care ratio (medical costs as a percentage of premium revenues). 20
  21. 21. The consolidated medical care ratio for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2004 of 80.5% and 80.8%, respectively, improved from 80.9% and 81.6% in the comparable 2003 periods. Excluding the AARP business,1 the medical care ratio for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2004 of 79.3% and 79.5%, respectively, improved from 79.5% and 80.3% in the comparable 2003 periods. These medical care ratio decreases resulted primarily from net premium rate increases that slightly exceeded overall medical beneÑt cost increases and changes in product, business and customer mix. Each period, our operating results include the eÅects of revisions in medical cost estimates related to all prior periods. Changes in medical cost estimates related to prior periods that are identiÑed in the current period are included in total medical costs reported for the current period. Medical costs for the third quarter of 2004 include approximately $50 million of favorable medical cost development related to the prior Ñscal years and $50 million of favorable medical cost development related to the Ñrst and second quarters of 2004. Medical costs for the third quarter of 2003 include approximately $20 million of favorable medical cost development related to prior Ñscal years and $80 million of favorable medical cost development related to the Ñrst and second quarters of 2003. Medical costs for the nine months ended September 30, 2004 and 2003 include approximately $200 million and $130 million, respectively, of favorable medical cost development related to prior years. On an absolute dollar basis, medical costs for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2004 increased $2.0 billion, or 39%, and $4.0 billion, or 26%, respectively, over the comparable 2003 periods. The increase was driven primarily by a rise in medical costs of approximately 9% due to medical cost inÖation and a moderate increase in health care consumption, and incremental medical costs related to businesses acquired since the third quarter of 2003. Operating Costs The operating cost ratio (operating costs as a percentage of total revenues) for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2004 of 15.1% and 15.5%, respectively, improved from 16.9% and 17.0% in the comparable 2003 periods. These decreases were driven primarily by revenue mix changes, with premium revenues growing at a faster rate than service revenues. Our premium-based products have lower operating cost ratios than our fee-based products. Additionally, the decrease in the operating cost ratio reÖects productivity gains from technology deployment and other cost management initiatives. On an absolute dollar basis, operating costs for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2004 increased $262 million, or 21%, and $531 million, or 15%, respectively, over the comparable 2003 periods. These increases were driven by a 2% increase in total individuals served by Health Care Services and Uniprise during the nine months ended September 30, 2004 over the comparable 2003 period excluding the impact of acquisitions, increases in broker commissions and premium taxes due to increased revenues, general operating cost inÖation and additional operating costs associated with businesses acquired since the third quarter of 2003. Depreciation and Amortization Depreciation and amortization for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2004 of $99 million and $268 million, respectively, increased from $75 million and $222 million in the comparable 2003 periods. The increases were due to additional depreciation and amortization resulting from higher levels of computer equipment, capitalized software and intangible assets as a result of technology enhancements, business growth and businesses acquired since the third quarter of 2003. 1 Management believes disclosure of the medical care ratio excluding the AARP business is meaningful since underwriting gains or losses related to the AARP business accrue to AARP policyholders through a rate stabilization fund (RSF). Although the Company is at risk for underwriting losses to the extent cumulative net losses exceed the balance in the RSF, the Company has not been required to fund any underwriting deÑcits to date and management believes the RSF balance is suÇcient to cover potential future underwriting or other risks associated with the contract during the foreseeable future. 21
  22. 22. Income Taxes Our eÅective income tax rate for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2004 was 34.0% and 34.6%, respectively, compared to 35.5% and 35.8% in the comparable 2003 periods. The decreases were driven by changes in business and income mix between states with diÅering income tax rates, as well as favorable settlements of prior year income tax returns. The eÅective tax rate excluding these settlements would have been approximately 35.0% for both the three and nine months ended September 30, 2004. Business Segments The following summarizes the operating results of our business segments for three and nine month periods ended September 30 (in millions): Revenues Three Months Ended Nine Months Ended September 30, September 30, Percent Percent 2004 2003 Change 2004 2003 Change Health Care Services ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ $8,712 $6,224 40% $23,350 $18,344 27% Uniprise ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 842 778 8% 2,520 2,322 9% Specialized Care ServicesÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 580 476 22% 1,707 1,393 23% Ingenix ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 170 148 15% 456 395 15% Eliminations ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ (445) (388) n/a (1,326) (1,154) n/a Consolidated Revenues ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ $9,859 $7,238 36% $26,707 $21,300 25% Earnings from Operations Three Months Ended Nine Months Ended September 30, September 30, Percent Percent 2004 2003 Change 2004 2003 Change Health Care Services ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ $ 763 $490 56% $1,976 $1,342 47% Uniprise ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 171 154 11% 508 459 11% Specialized Care Services ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 124 100 24% 356 281 27% IngenixÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 34 19 79% 73 43 70% Consolidated Earnings from Operations ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ $1,092 $763 43% $2,913 $2,125 37% Health Care Services The Health Care Services segment, comprised of the UnitedHealthcare, Ovations and AmeriChoice businesses, had revenues for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2004 of $8.7 billion and $23.4 billion, respectively, representing increases of $2.5 billion, or 40%, and $5.0 billion, or 27%, over the comparable 2003 periods. Excluding the impact of acquisitions, Health Care Services revenues for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2004 increased by approximately 8% and 7%, respectively, primarily driven by premium rate increases partially oÅset by a decrease in the number of individuals served by commercial risk-based products. The increase in Health Care Services revenues primarily resulted from an increase in UnitedHealthcare premium revenues for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2004 of $2.0 billion and $3.9 billion, respectively, due mainly to the acquisitions of Oxford, MAMSI and Golden Rule since the third quarter of 2003 and average net premium rate increases of approximately 9% to 10% on UnitedHealthcare's renewing commercial risk-based business, partially oÅset by a decrease in the number of individuals served by 22
  23. 23. risk-based products. The remaining increase in Health Care Services revenues was largely due to growth in the number of individuals served by UnitedHealthcare fee-based products, Ovations Medicare supplement products provided to AARP members, Ovations Medicare Advantage products, and AmeriChoice Medicaid products, as well as annual rate increases on these products. For the three and nine months ended September 30, 2004, Health Care Services earnings from operations of $763 million and $2.0 billion, respectively, increased $273 million, or 56%, and $634 million, or 47%, over the comparable 2003 periods. These increases primarily resulted from revenue growth and improved gross margins on UnitedHealthcare's risk-based products, growth in the number of individuals served by UnitedHealthcare's fee-based products, and the acquisitions of Oxford, MAMSI and Golden Rule since the third quarter of 2003. UnitedHealthcare's commercial medical care ratio decreased to 78.6% in the third quarter of 2004 from 79.2% in 2003. The decrease is mainly due to net premium rate increases that slightly exceeded overall medical beneÑt cost increases and changes in business and customer mix. Health Care Services' operating margin for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2004 improved to 8.8% and 8.5% from 7.9% and 7.3%, respectively, in the comparable 2003 periods. This was driven mainly by the lower medical care ratios and changes in business and customer mix discussed above. The following table summarizes individuals served by Health Care Services, by major market segment and funding arrangement, as of September 30 (in thousands)1: 2004 2003 Commercial Risk-based ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 7,635 5,005 Fee-based ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 3,200 2,855 Total Commercial ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 10,835 7,860 Medicare Advantage ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 315 225 Medicaid ÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 1,240 1,090 Total Health Care ServicesÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏÏ 12,390 9,175 1 Excludes individuals served by Ovations' Medicare supplement products to AARP members. The number of individuals served by UnitedHealthcare's commercial business as of September 30, 2004 was 10.8 million, an increase of approximately 3.0 million, or 38%, from September 30, 2003. Excluding the acquisitions of Oxford, MAMSI, Golden Rule and a smaller regional health plan, the number of individuals served by UnitedHealthcare's commercial business increased by 125,000. This was comprised of an increase of approximately 220,000 in the number of individuals served with commercial fee-based products, driven by new customer relationships and customers converting from risk-based products to fee-based products, partially oÅset by a 95,000 decrease in the number of individuals served by risk-based products, resulting from customers converting to self-funded, fee-based arrangements and a competitive commercial risk-based pricing environment. Excluding the Oxford acquisition, the number of individuals served by Ovations' Medicare Advantage increased by 20,000, or 9%, from September 30, 2003. AmeriChoice's Medicaid enrollment increased by 150,000, or 14%, due to strong organic growth in the number of individuals served and the acquisition of a Medicaid health plan in Michigan in February 2004, resulting in the addition of approximately 95,000 individuals served. Uniprise Uniprise revenues for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2004 of $842 million, and $2.5 billion, respectively, increased by $64 million, or 8%, and $198 million, or 9%, over the comparable 2003 periods. These increases were driven primarily by growth of approximately 3% in the number of individuals served by Uniprise during the nine months ended September 30, 2004 over the comparable 2003 period and annual rate 23
  24. 24. increases. Uniprise served 9.6 million individuals and 9.2 million individuals as of September 30, 2004 and 2003, respectively. Uniprise earnings from operations for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2004 of $171 million and $508 million, respectively, increased $17 million, or 11%, and $49 million, or 11%, over the comparable 2003 periods. Operating margin for the three months ended September 30, 2004 improved to 20.3% and 20.2%, respectively, from 19.8% for both of the comparable 2003 periods. Uniprise has expanded its operating margin through operating cost eÇciencies derived from process improvements, technology deployment and cost management initiatives that have reduced labor and occupancy costs in its transaction processing and customer service, billing and enrollment functions. Specialized Care Services For the three and nine months ended September 30, 2004, Specialized Care Services revenues of $580 million and $1.7 billion, respectively, increased by $104 million, or 22%, and $314 million, or 23%, over the comparable 2003 periods. These increases were principally driven by an increase in the number of individuals served by certain of its specialty beneÑt businesses and rate increases related to these businesses as well as revenues related to businesses acquired since the third quarter of 2003 of approximately $27 million and $79 million for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2004, respectively. Earnings from operations for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2004 of $124 million and $356 million, respectively, increased $24 million, or 24%, and $75 million, or 27%, over the comparable 2003 periods. Specialized Care Services' operating margin for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2004 improved to 21.4% and 20.9%, from 21.0% and 20.2%, respectively, in the comparable 2003 periods. These increases were driven primarily by operational and productivity improvements within several of Specialized Care Services' businesses. With the continuing growth of the Specialized Care Services segment, we are consolidating production and service operations to improve service, quality and consistency, and to enhance productivity and eÇciency. Ingenix For the three and nine months ended September 30, 2004, Ingenix revenues of $170 million and $456 million, respectively, increased by $22 million, or 15%, and $61 million, or 15%, over the comparable 2003 periods. This was driven mainly by new business growth in the health information and clinical research businesses. Earnings from operations for the three and nine month periods ended September 30, 2004 were $34 million and $73 million, respectively, increasing by 79% and 70% over the comparable 2003 periods. The operating margin for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2004 improved to 20.0% and 16.0%, from 12.8% and 10.9%, respectively, in the comparable 2003 periods. These increases were driven by growth and expanding margins in the health information and clinical research businesses. Ingenix typically generates higher revenues and operating margins in the second half of the year due to seasonally strong demand for its higher margin health information products. Financial Condition and Liquidity at September 30, 2004 Liquidity We manage our cash, investments and capital structure so we are able to meet the short- and long-term obligations of our business while maintaining strong Ñnancial Öexibility and liquidity. We forecast, analyze and monitor our cash Öows to enable prudent investment and Ñnancing activities within the conÑnes of our Ñnancial strategy. Our regulated subsidiaries generate signiÑcant cash Öows from operations. A majority of the assets held by our regulated subsidiaries are in the form of cash, cash equivalents and investments. After considering expected cash Öows from operating activities, we generally invest monies of regulated subsidiaries that exceed our short- term obligations in longer term, investment-grade, marketable debt securities to improve our overall investment return while meeting capital adequacy requirements. Factors we consider in making these 24
  25. 25. investment decisions include our board of directors' approved investment policy, regulatory limitations, return objectives, tax implications, risk tolerance and maturity dates. Our long-term investments are also available for sale to meet short-term liquidity and other needs. Monies in excess of the capital needs of our regulated entities are paid to their non-regulated parent companies, typically in the form of dividends, for general corporate use, when and as permitted by applicable regulations. Our non-regulated businesses also generate signiÑcant cash Öows from operations for general corporate use. Cash Öows generated by these entities, combined with the issuance of commercial paper, long-term debt and the availability of our committed credit facility, further strengthens our operating and Ñnancial Öexibility. We generally use these cash Öows to reinvest in our businesses in the form of capital expenditures, to expand the depth and breadth of our services through business acquisitions, and to repurchase shares of our common stock, depending on market conditions. Cash generated from operating activities, our primary source of liquidity, is principally from net earnings, excluding depreciation and amortization. As a result, any future decline in our proÑtability may have a negative impact on our liquidity. The level of proÑtability of our risk-based business depends in large part on our ability to accurately predict and price for health care cost increases. This risk is partially mitigated by the diversity of our other businesses, the geographic diversity of our risk-based business and our disciplined underwriting and pricing processes, which seek to match premium rate increases with future health care costs. In 2003, a hypothetical 1% increase in commercial insured medical costs would have reduced net earnings by approximately $75 million. The availability of Ñnancing in the form of debt or equity is inÖuenced by many factors, including our proÑtability, operating cash Öows, debt levels, debt ratings, contractual restrictions, regulatory requirements and market conditions. We believe that our strategies and actions toward maintaining Ñnancial Öexibility mitigate much of this risk. Cash and Investments Cash Öows from operating activities were nearly $2.9 billion in the nine months ended September 30, 2004, representing an increase over the comparable 2003 period of $752 million, or 35%. This increase in operating cash Öows resulted primarily from an increase of $573 million in net income excluding depreciation, amortization and other noncash items. Operating cash Öows increased by $179 million due to cash generated by working capital changes. As premium revenues and related medical costs increase, we typically generate incremental operating cash Öows because we collect premium revenues in advance of the claim payments for related medical costs. We maintained a strong Ñnancial condition and liquidity position, with cash and investments of $12.5 billion at September 30, 2004. Total cash and investments increased by $3.0 billion since December 31, 2003, primarily due to cash and investments acquired in the Oxford and MAMSI acquisitions in 2004 and strong operating cash Öows, partially oÅset by capital expenditures, cash paid for business acquisitions and common stock repurchases. As further described under quot;quot;Regulatory Capital and Dividend Restrictions,'' many of our subsidiaries are subject to various government regulations that restrict the timing and amount of dividends and other distributions that may be paid to their parent companies. At September 30, 2004, approximately $310 million of our $12.5 billion of cash and investments was held by non-regulated subsidiaries and was available for general corporate use, including acquisitions and share repurchases. Financing and Investing Activities In addition to our strong cash Öows generated by operating activities, we use commercial paper and debt to maintain adequate operating and Ñnancial Öexibility. As of September 30, 2004 and December 31, 2003, we had commercial paper and debt outstanding of approximately $3.9 billion and $2.0 billion, respectively. Our debt-to-total-capital ratio was 26.1% and 27.8% as of September 30, 2004 and December 31, 2003, 25

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