KNIGHT’S SEPT. 11TH FUND SUPPORTED 246 SERVICE PROVIDERS IN 26 COMMUNITIES:

LONG BEACH DAY NURSERY • SEXUAL ASSAULT CRISI...
Statement of Purpose                                                 Table of Contents


        he John S. and James L. K...
‘Crises refine life. In them you discover what you are.’
                       – Allan K. Chalmers, author and civil righ...
FROM               CHAIRMAN
                                                           THE



                   New Crise...
FROM                 CHAIRMAN
                                                          THE




tics (see page 33), follow...
FROM                PRESIDENT
                                                        THE



                   Ensuring J...
FROM                 PRESIDENT
                                                                   THE




reverberates tod...
A COMMUNITY’S PERSPECTIVE


          Long Beach 90806: An American Microcosm




This mural by Elliott Pinkney, Together ...
COMMUNITY PARTNERS


                             Taking Shape One Day at a Time
   t’s Feb. 14, 2002. Valentine’s Day.   ...
A COMMUNITY’S PERSPECTIVE




The King Kong Studio on East Anaheim Street in Central Long Beach shows its patriotism.


  ...
COMMUNITY PARTNERS




  (See more about Williams’ work as a                 two weeks away, but she’s sharing            ...
A COMMUNITY’S PERSPECTIVE




Daniel Melena plays outside an apartment on Chestnut Avenue. 90806 has the city’s highest pe...
COMMUNITY PARTNERS




    We believe our best chance to suc-           prospective funding partners, research            ...
A PARTNER’S PERSPECTIVE

                     What’s Different About This Process?
                                       ...
COMMUNITY PARTNERS




tant turn when members try to identify                We’re finding partners and devel-            ...
AN ADVISER’S PERSPECTIVE


                        ‘Not Enough Heads for All the Hats‘




With the Sorlie Bridge linking ...
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2001 KF Annual Report

  1. 1. KNIGHT’S SEPT. 11TH FUND SUPPORTED 246 SERVICE PROVIDERS IN 26 COMMUNITIES: LONG BEACH DAY NURSERY • SEXUAL ASSAULT CRISIS AGENCY • LOAVES AND FISHES • COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIP FOR HOMELESS • DAILY BREAD FOOD BANK • FARM SHARE • S.O.S. HEALTH CARE • PHILADELPHIA COMMITTEE FOR THE HOMELESS • THE VILLAGE OF ARTS AND HUMANITIES • ASIAN AMERICANS FOR COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT OF SANTA CLARA COUNTY • IMMIGRANT RESETTLEMENT AND CULTURAL CENTER • PLANNED PARENTHOOD MAR MONTE • SUPPORT NETWORK FOR BATTERED WOMEN • CHILDREN’S HOME SOCIETY OF FLORIDA (NORTH CENTRAL DIVISION) • MOTHERS IN CRISIS • SAFE HARBOR • BATTERED WOMEN’S SHELTER • GOOD NEIGHBORS • SECOND HARVEST FOOD BANK OF SANTA CLARA AND SAN MATEO COUNTIES • THE SALVATION ARMY (MILLEDGEVILLE) • GULF COAST WOMEN’S CENTER FOR NONVIOLENCE • AID TO VICTIMS OF DOMESTIC ABUSE • COMMITTEE FOR DIGNITY AND FAIRNESS FOR THE HOMELESS HOUSING DEVELOPMENT • BOULDER COUNTY SAFEHOUSE • LONGMONT COALITION FOR WOMEN IN CRISIS • MEALS ON WHEELS PLUS OF MANATEE • THE SALVATION ARMY (GULFPORT) • INFO LINE • CRISIS ASSISTANCE MINISTRY •THE FAMILY CENTER • HARVEST HOPE FOOD BANK • SISTERCARE • OPEN DOOR COMMUNITY HOUSE • SCAN • ST. VINCENT DE PAUL OF SAN MATEO • ST. PETER’S HOME FOR BOYS • ARAB COMMUNITY CENTER FOR ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL SERVICES • FOCUS: HOPE • ARAB-CHALDEAN COMMUNITY SOCIAL SERVICES COUNCIL • BOYS & GIRLS CLUBS OF SUMMIT COUNTY • AIDS TASK FORCE • DETROIT RESCUE MISSION MINISTRIES • FORGOTTEN HARVEST • HAVEN • THE SALVATION ARMY (AKRON) • BIG BROTHERS BIG SISTERS OF GREATER MIAMI • CATHOLIC CHARITIES • CENTER AGAINST SEXUAL AND DOMESTIC ABUSE • TURNSTONE CENTER FOR DISABLED CHILDREN & ADULTS • CASA OF ABERDEEN FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT • MANATEE CHILDREN’S SERVICES • COMMUNITY VIOLENCE INTERVENTION CENTER • AKRON COMMUNITY SERVICE CENTER & URBAN LEAGUE • AKRON-CANTON REGIONAL FOODBANK • CATHOLIC SOCIAL SERVICES OF SUMMIT COUNTY • HABITAT FOR HUMANITY OF GREATER AKRON • HAVEN OF REST MINISTRIES • INTERVAL BROTHERHOOD HOMES • LET’S GROW AKRON • OPPORTUNITY PARISH ECUMENICAL NEIGHBORHOOD MINISTRY • SUMMIT COUNTY COMMUNITY DRUG BOARD • YOUNG MEN’S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION OF AKRON • BOYS AND GIRLS CLUBS OF THE GULF COAST • CATHOLIC SOCIAL & COMMUNITY SERVICES • MENTAL HEALTH ASSOCIATION OF MISSISSIPPI • MOORE COMMUNITY HOUSE • THE SALVATION ARMY (BILOXI) • SOUTH MISSISSIPPI 2001 ANNUAL REPORT ★ NEW CRISES, ENDURING COMMITMENTS EXCHANGE CLUBS CHILD ABUSE PREVENTION CENTER CHARLOTTE CENTER FOR URBAN MINISTRY • THE LORD’S PLACE AND FAMILY SHELTER WEST PALM BEACH • CHILDREN’S HAVEN & ADULT COMMUNITY SERVICES • THE CENTER FOR FAMILY SERVICES OF PALM BEACH COUNTY • THE SALVATION ARMY • MANATEE OPPORTUNITY COUNCIL • ROTACARE BAY AREA • THE CENTER FOR INFORMATION & CRISIS SERVICES • RUTH RALES JEWISH FAMILY SERVICE • ST. PAUL WESTERN PALM BEACH COUNTY FOOD DISTRIBUTION CENTER • BOULDER SHELTER FOR THE HOMELESS • EMERGENCY FAMILY ASSISTANCE ASSOCIATION • THE INN BETWEEN OF LONGMONT • HOPE FAMILY SERVICES • CABARRUS COOPERATIVE CHRISTIAN MINISTRY • CATHOLIC SOCIAL SERVICES OF THE DIOCESE OF CHARLOTTE • CHARLOTTE RESCUE MISSION • COMMUNITY CULINARY SCHOOL OF CHARLOTTE •CUP INC. • DAY SHELTER • GOODWILL INDUSTRIES OF SOUTHERN PIEDMONT • PILGRIMS’ INN •THE SALVATION ARMY (ABERDEEN) • ACCESS INC. • SECOND HARVEST/METROLINA FOOD BANK • TURNING POINT OF UNION COUNTY • UNITED FAMILY SERVICES • FAMILY SERVICE CENTER OF S.C. • GOODWILL INDUSTRIES • COLUMBUS BAPTIST ASSOCIATION • HOUSE OF RESTORATION • HOUSE OF T.I.M.E. • SECOND HARVEST FOOD BANK OF THE CHATTAHOOCHEE VALLEY • UPTOWN OUTREACH FOOD PANTRY • VALLEY RESCUE MISSION • BOYSVILLE OF MICHIGAN • COALITION ON TEMPORARY SHELTER • COVENANT HOUSE MICHIGAN • EASTSIDE EMERGENCY CENTER • FOOD BANK OF OAKLAND COUNTY • VINCENT HOUSE • GLEANERS COMMUNITY FOOD BANK • GOODWILL INDUSTRIES OF GREATER DETROIT • HELPSOURCE • JEWISH FAMILY SERVICE • L.I.F.T. WOMEN’S RESOURCE CENTER • LIGHTHOUSE EMERGENCY SERVICES • MACOMB COUNTY ROTATING EMERGENCY SHELTER TEAM • OZONE HOUSE • SOCIETY OF ST. VINCENT DE PAUL OF THE CITY OF DETROIT • SOS COMMUNITY SERVICES • STARFISH FAMILY SERVICES • THINK DETROIT
  2. 2. Statement of Purpose Table of Contents he John S. and James L. Knight T From the Chairman 2 Foundation was established in 1950 as a private foundation From the President 4 independent of the Knight brothers’ 2001 Programs and Features 6 newspaper enterprises. It is dedicated to furthering their ideals of service to Community Partners 6 community, to the highest standards Journalism Initiatives 18 of journalistic excellence and to the defense of a free press. 26 National Venture Fund In both their publishing and phil- Knight Commission on Intercollegiate Athletics 31 anthropic undertakings, the Knight brothers shared a broad vision and History 33 uncommon devotion to the common welfare. It is those ideals, as well as Trustees and Officers 38 their philanthropic interests, to which Staff 40 the foundation remains faithful. To heighten the impact of our grant Grants 42 making, Knight Foundation’s trustees Index of Grants 43 have elected to focus on two signature programs, Journalism Initiatives and Sept. 11 Recipients 57 Community Partners, each with its own eligibility requirements. A third Investment Report 62 program, the National Venture Fund, Auditors’ Report 63 supports innovative opportunities and initiatives at the national level that Financial Information 64 relate directly or indirectly to Knight’s work in its 26 communities. Letter of Inquiry 70 In a rapidly changing world, the Production Credits 71 foundation also remains flexible enough to respond to unique chal- lenges, ideas and projects that lie beyond its identified program areas, yet would fulfill the broad vision of its founders. None of the grant making would be possible without a sound financial base. Thus, preserving and enhancing the foundation’s assets through pru- dent investment management contin- ues to be of paramount importance.
  3. 3. ‘Crises refine life. In them you discover what you are.’ – Allan K. Chalmers, author and civil rights activist Page 4 Page 6 Page 27 Page 20 he global community has shared a heightened sense that everything seems far T more serious since the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11. It was a historic moment for the working media and our journalism partners, a chance to “reclaim and reassert the best that journalism has to offer,” says a key Knight adviser. The 26 Knight communities reflected a nation dealing with the secondary victims of the attacks – needy people coping with the economic shock, making do with even less. The 246 service providers benefiting from Knight’s $10 million Sept. 11 Fund can, and will, help. The foundation’s enduring commitment to those 26 communities through a re- vamped approach to funding took long strides in 2001, forging promising partnerships in such civic laboratories as Central Long Beach, downtown Charlotte, the “Grand Cities” region and the Beall’s Hill neighborhood in Macon. 2001: A year of refinement and discovery. 2001 ANNUAL REPORT 1
  4. 4. FROM CHAIRMAN THE New Crises, Enduring Commitments n this space last year, you read about ations with these places and the field of I a new strategic plan here at the John journalism. S. and James L. Knight Foundation. As the Community Partners Program The plan suggests that the founda- has developed, we’ve seen the new advi- tion’s approach to grant making ought sory committees, steeped in the nuance to be as holistic as our emergency of local conditions, engaged in vigor- response was in Miami after 1992’s ous discussions of complex issues. Hurricane Andrew and in Grand Forks We’ve learned along with them that set- after the ’97 Red River flood. ting priorities is difficult. Their mem- Back then, my fellow trustees and I bers understand they cannot possibly heard and saw how such acts of nature have an impact on every community galvanized people and made them feel need and opportunity, certainly not W. Gerald Austen, M.D. more connected to their communities. with the limited resources of one foun- Following both catastrophes, Knight’s dation. They have figured out they can we’ve shared a heightened national trustees and staff responded to the have their greatest impact by concen- sense that everything – late-night talk communities’ needs and committed trating on just a few highly specific show hosts and major-league baseball significant funding and other resources. needs and by taking multiple approach- included – seems more serious, sober Behind such leaders as Miami’s Alvah es to addressing them. As Maidenberg and purposeful. America’s wartime cir- H. Chapman Jr. and Grand Forks’ Mike points out in his article on page 14, cumstances and economic recession Maidenberg, we found ourselves con- Knight’s promise of partnership, re- have made it absolutely clear that the necting to the energy and passion of search and resources has changed the stakes have been raised. Collectively, we communities working together to way people in the Grand Forks area are determined to make our labors, our rebuild, to transform themselves into think about their region. time and our commitments more something better than they were before We shared many wonderful experi- meaningful than ever before. the crisis. We concentrated on projects ences in 2001. In June, Knight Founda- At Knight Foundation, a history of that would sharpen the focus and tion’s trustees concluded an 18-month responding to crises combines with a heighten the impact of our grants. We observation of our 50th anniversary by strategic recommitment to our 26 joined with other funders to help the gathering in Miami with a great many communities, giving clear direction to communities identify what matters friends and funding partners. We chose grant making. We believe our best most. We demonstrated long-term com- that night to demonstrate our new chance to succeed is by helping com- mitment. holistic approach to funding. Hodding munities work toward their own defi- We have incorporated these values Carter and I described our newly fo- nitions of community success over the as we’ve developed a new Community cused funding priorities and how the long haul. Partners Program and a new National foundation intended to work more Knight’s $10 million Sept. 11 com- Venture Fund, and in shaping our Jour- directly with the recipients of our mitment is helping nonprofit service nalism Initiatives program. grants. While we made a total of 55 providers in our communities to re- We remain busily involved in a care- grants in all of our primary funding bound and serve their citizens caught in ful rollout of the Community Partners areas, more than half of the nearly $24 a world of dire need. The fund demon- Program, in which local advisory com- million in awards we announced that strates that at such times of stress and mittees help select community priori- evening target large-scale community struggle, the foundations of this coun- ties and the measurable outcomes that development. Much of it is directed to try, blessed by resources however finite, address them. In journalism, Knight’s Overtown, Miami’s historically black can and must step up and give more. funding continues to focus on journal- downtown. Hodding put it this way: This crisis may pass, but others ism of excellence, press freedom and “Effective community development is loom. Like those that came before, they diversity. Though anecdotal, reports comprehensive, continuous and collab- become opportunities for discovery. from the field have confirmed our orative.” Regardless, ours is a sustained commit- belief that we are on the right path with The year also saw the final report of ment to Knight communities and to these approaches. the reconstituted Knight Foundation journalism of excellence. We intend to Since the horrific events of Sept. 11, Commission on Intercollegiate Athle- take advantage of our enduring associ- 2 JOHN S. JA M E S L . K N I G H T F O U N DAT I O N AND
  5. 5. FROM CHAIRMAN THE tics (see page 33), following the origi- community in June 2000. nal panel’s three seminal reports in the Despite the weight of the past year’s 1990s calling for reform of a system events, we’re optimistic about Knight spiraling out of control. The Knight Foundation’s new direction and encour- Commission found that despite con- aged by the energy directed to our pro- siderable progress, the chasm between grams. We see it in play in the rollout of higher education’s ideals and big-time the Community Partners Program as college sports has widened. The com- advisory committee members are chal- Alvah H. Chapman Jr. John D. Ong mission’s report inspired headlines and lenging conventional wisdom, drilling editorial praise for raising the issues down to fundamentals. Our journalism again, including a strong recommenda- program officers are gathering together Review Committee – our version of an tion encouraging big-time football and groups with common interests in the appropriations committee – since 1986, basketball programs to graduate more field, and the conversations are leading and has served as its chairman since than 50 percent of their student ath- to new collaborations and new net- 1994. Four times a year, Alvah has pre- letes by 2007. We will watch the educa- works. Experts in our funding interests sented to our board a description of tion and sports community with inter- are visiting the 26 Knight communities and recommendation on every major est as they move together toward mul- during grant development and are grant allocation we’ve made. He also tilateral reform. We also thank co- introducing new models for what guided the development of a stable chairs William Friday, president emeri- works, expanding local horizons. We grant-making plan that enabled Knight tus of the University of North Carolina, believe that better grants begin with a Foundation to increase our giving and the Rev. Theodore Hesburgh, pres- determination to see the whole picture gradually over time without the violent ident emeritus of the University of at the front end. swings suffered by some other founda- Notre Dame, and all of the commis- The September attacks caution us to tions in an up-and-down stock market. sioners for their sustained leadership. never take anything for granted. These He has been a wise leader, a sensible 2001 was a harsh year economically events remind us that a new crisis, no voice and a moral compass for us. for just about everyone, given the real- matter how unimaginable, is never far In late February 2002, Trustee John ity of an advancing recession made from tomorrow’s headlines. Our next D. Ong presented his credentials to worse by the impact of Sept. 11. Like tragic episode may be an act of God or King Harald in Oslo as he became the many other institutional investors, our man, a fleeting instance or a prolonged U.S. ambassador to Norway. Since join- asset base suffered, though at a com- affair, of international concern or neigh- ing us in June 1995, John Ong has pro- paratively moderate rate. Thanks to borhood impact. Regardless, Knight vided leadership and direction during a investment strategies overseen by Foundation is committed to doing period of intense staff growth, serving Trustee Gordon E. Heffern and his everything we can to help. as chairman of our Administrative and Finance Committee, and excellent work Human Resources and Pension Plan by the investment staff, we closed out Administrative committees. The chair- the year at $1.9 billion, down from our man emeritus of BFGoodrich played all-time high of $2.2 billion. It allowed an important role in helping us devel- us to approve $86.4 million in 319 new W. Gerald Austen, M.D. op a slate of grants for Akron as we grants in 2001. Chairman launched our anniversary year in that We wish two fellow trustees well as they depart. Alvah Chapman brought 31 years of The Year in Review Jan. 1, 2001 – Dec. 31, 2001 exceptional service to the foundation to a close as he left the board in March Assets: $1.9 billion 2002. Throughout those years he has Grants paid out: $85.0 million played a key role in developing the Proposals received: 1,064 foundation’s visions and goals and the New grants approved: $86.4 million (319 grants) strategies to achieve them successfully. Average grant size: $270,950 He has been a member of the Grants 2001 ANNUAL REPORT 3
  6. 6. FROM PRESIDENT THE Ensuring Journalism’s Essential Role ach of us knows where and how It is a function that no government, E the horrifying news reached us on whatever its ideology or form, actually Sept. 11. That devastating day is welcomes, but it lies at the root of the branded into the national conscious- First Amendment’s guarantee of press ness in a way previously reserved for freedom. In times of war, it is a right the attack on Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, every government reflexively seeks to 1941, and the assassination of President curtail, sometimes in justifiable ways, John F. Kennedy on Nov. 22, 1963. frequently in unacceptable ways and However each of us learned of the occasionally in reprehensible ways. barbaric act of mass murder that lev- This, too, is written by someone eled the World Trade Center, we also who, as a State Department spokesman know where we turned thereafter: to in a time of trouble, relearned a time- Hodding Carter III the news media. In those anxious, pan- less reality: Governments, democratic yearlong courses of university study, icky hours and then days after the twin or not, are not in the truth business. weeklong seminars and two-day short towers collapsed in pyramids of rubble They are in the governance business, courses. Knight Foundation has en- and death, television, newspapers, radio the policy implementation business. dowed 16 chairs at universities from and the Internet were our informants, None should lie, save in the most Arizona to Florida, Michigan to Mary- guides and alter egos, asking the ques- exceptional circumstances, usually in land, North Carolina to Kansas to put tions we wanted asked, interpreting the wartime. As a matter of fact, decent distinguished working journalists in answers and separating the wheat from ones do not routinely, or even fre- close touch with those who hope to the chaff with impressive – and expen- quently, lie. But it can be asserted with- become journalists. We have invested sive – professionalism. We were re-edu- out qualification that all deliberately well over $20 million in organizations cated in the wisdom of the nation’s withhold information that might polit- working overseas to train reporters, founders, who placed a premium on a ically embarrass a president, call into managers and editors in newly free or free press and free speech not merely question aspects of policy or under- newly democratic countries, to encour- with lip service but within a powerful mine the official version of reality, for- age institutionalization of press free- Bill of Rights. eign or domestic. dom, and to seek justice when news Mine is not the observation of a Against that reality, the press has an persons are persecuted or killed. neutral observer. Having spent much obligation to act as surrogate for the Increasingly, too, Knight has under- of my life in the news business, my people, asking the hard questions, dig- written programs to supplement and pride in my old profession and belief in ging beyond the surface to get at the deepen the work of news organizations its central role in this democratic facts, questioning the official line. It is seeking to beat back excessive govern- republic were dramatically rekindled not always a popular task, particularly ment secrecy, improve the mass media’s by its post-attack performance. More in times such as these when the nation inadequate coverage of foreign affairs, to the point of this report, the post- is threatened and the natural public and train overseas reporters to recog- attack coverage reinforced my certainty instinct is to rally behind the govern- nize gross violations of the rules of war that Knight Foundation’s long concern ment. But history shows repeatedly when they see them. Knight-supported with press performance and press free- that to abandon that task is to weaken programs train investigative reporters, dom has and does make sense in ways the foundations of a free society. act as the major journalistic users of that affect the functioning of our Ironically, recent history also demon- the nation’s Freedom of Information democracy – and thus each of our com- strates that presidencies that relied Act and publish book-length studies of munities – no less than of the media. most on secrecy and the manipulation governmental corruption and political The foundation allocates up to 25 of information were almost invariably influence-peddling. percent of its grants every year to this themselves fatally weakened by the It cannot be emphasized enough general area. As a result, Knight is the exercise. that the press has an absolute obliga- largest philanthropic funder of jour- Some 30 years ago, a great Yale Law tion, no less than the right, to monitor nalism-related organizations, causes School professor who was a legal con- government performance whether in and programs within the United States. servative wrote something in the con- times of stress or times of tranquillity. Among many other things, we support text of the Pentagon Papers case that 4 JOHN S. JA M E S L . K N I G H T F O U N DAT I O N AND
  7. 7. FROM PRESIDENT THE reverberates today. As Alexander Bickel the same ideals into action, whatever put it: “The press’ chief responsibility is the political climate, at home and to play its role in the contest (of gov- abroad. Like them, we are certain that ernment and press), for it is the contest the health of the nation and the world that serves the interest of society as a depend on doing no less. The new twi- whole.” Or, as the great Soviet dissident light struggle in which the nation finds and Nobel Laureate, Alexander Solzhenit- itself has already claimed thousands of syn, once wrote in a letter to the gov- lives and two monumental buildings, ernment-toadying Writers Union of the symbols of our economic might. It Russian Republic: cannot be allowed to lay waste the Travelers at Singapore’s Changi International “Publicity and openness, honest and nation’s most fundamental values as Airport watch CNBC’s live coverage Sept. 11 of the collapse of the World Trade Center. complete … that is the prime condition well. for the health of every society. The man Jack Knight, speaking of his beloved who does not want publicity and open- the Vietnam War when he decried the newspaper business, put it clearly and ness for his Fatherland does not want American government’s tendency “to directly: “We must report the world as to cleanse it of its diseases, but to drive smother the voices of dissent in the flag it is and not as we would like it to be.” them inside, so they may rot there.” of patriotism.” As stewards of his John S. Knight knew all this in his money and ideals, and those of James bones and practiced it as a journalist L. Knight, his newspaperman brother, throughout his career, most notably we at Knight Foundation continue to Hodding Carter III during his long years of opposition to support those who are willing to put President and CEO People make their way amid debris near the World Trade Center in New York Sept. 11 after the collapse of the twin 110-story towers. 2001 ANNUAL REPORT 5
  8. 8. A COMMUNITY’S PERSPECTIVE Long Beach 90806: An American Microcosm This mural by Elliott Pinkney, Together We Dance, demonstrates the ethnic blend of the 90806 ZIP code in Long Beach. A portion of Little Phnom Penh – the largest Cambodian community outside Southeast Asia – falls within its boundaries. The makeup of ethnic subgroups has retail space, 350 residential units, and a 120- The Long Beach Community Advisory Commit- changed as well. Twenty-five years ago, Long room hotel. tee was the first of Knight’s 26 local advisory Beach had a very small Cambodian popula- These developments are significant for a boards to recommend its priorities for the tion; now it has the largest Cambodian com- city that in the early 1990s lost one of its Community Partners Program. After much delib- munity – called Little Phnom Penh – outside largest employers, the U.S. Navy, as a result eration, the committee decided to narrow its Southeast Asia. Many of these residents were of the military base closings that occurred focus to improving school readiness for chil- admitted into the United States as refugees as nationwide. “We had all our eggs in one bas- dren, with an emphasis on the children and a result of the four-year holocaust of the ket,” said Mayor Beverly O’Neill recently, families living in the 90806 ZIP code. Khmer Rouge in the 1970s. referring to the Navy’s departure. “We have Considering the diverse needs of the 462,000 All of these trends have made Long Beach, probably changed more ... than any other city residents of Long Beach, why is the commit- according to Mayor O’Neill, “the most diverse in the United States.” tee emphasizing school readiness? And why city” in the United States, a contention sup- But as important as economic redevelop- 90806? ported by the balance among ethnic popula- ment has been for Long Beach during the past tions. City residents embrace over 40 cultures two decades, the city’s demographic changes The city of Long Beach, nestled along the and speak more than 60 languages. have been perhaps even more profound. In southeast shore of Los Angeles County, is a Nowhere are these transformations more 1980, non-Hispanic whites made up almost city on the move. A new Aquarium of the apparent than in ZIP code 90806, an area 70 percent of the total population. By 1990 Pacific and a freshly minted Convention & known as Central Long Beach. Stretching they declined to less than half the overall pop- Entertainment Center now overlook the shore- roughly from Pacific Coast Highway on the ulation. Today they make up less than 35 per- line, along with several glittery hotels. A few south to Spring Street on the north, 90806 is cent. Meanwhile, the number of Hispanics blocks away in downtown, years of redevel- a microcosm of diversity. There you can find has tripled over the last two decades, so that opment spending are finally having some suc- restaurants like the Working Wok a few doors they now make up about 36 percent of the cess rejuvenating lower Pine Street, a bustling down from the African American Gift Shop, overall population. Blacks account for about area with an Art Deco feel. City Place, a $75 and Hong Kong Express Donuts catercorner 15 percent and Asian-Americans for about 12 million development under way in the heart of ▲ from El Carnival Market. percent. downtown, will add 454,000 square feet of 6 JOHN S. JA M E S L . K N I G H T F O U N DAT I O N AND
  9. 9. COMMUNITY PARTNERS Taking Shape One Day at a Time t’s Feb. 14, 2002. Valentine’s Day. mittee members who will recom- How Race is Lived in America – to the I Across America, Knight Foundation’s mend priorities for funding and Charlotte committee. The members new Community Partners Program strategies for achieving measurable have said that race relations is an hits the ground running as a typical day results in the culturally diverse and important local issue, one worthy of begins: complex southeast Michigan region. Knight’s support, and they wish to ➢ In Miami, fellow program director improve their understanding. She ➢ In Biloxi, Knight’s new Community Gary Burger updates a constantly works on a community investment Advisory Committee assembles for changing color-coded chart that plan – a road map for how she and its first official meeting. Led by pro- shows where his and Ervin’s troops the Charlotte committee will invest gram officer Alfredo Cruz and chair- are deployed as well as where each of in its priorities of improved school man Ricky Mathews, the committee Knight’s 26 communities stands in readiness, cleaner air and water, and – 10 representatives of businesses the three-year rollout of Community improved race relations. ➢ Liaison John Williams II arrives at and nonprofits in Biloxi, Gulfport Partners. He talks with his staff in and Pass Christian – discusses a the field about grant development San Jose International Airport from PowerPoint presentation explaining and setting priorities, reviews the his home base in Long Beach, a series the new program and the commit- resumes of candidates for three new of local interviews ahead of him in tee’s role in it. program liaison positions and re- what he calls a day of “early recon- ➢ In Detroit, program director Joe sponds to requests for information naissance.” On his list: nonprofit Ervin – 41 days on the job and from prospective funding partners. leaders who may turn out to be com- ➢ In Charlotte, liaison Susan Patterson already a veteran – gathers for a sim- munity partners working toward San ▲ ilar orientation with the dozen com- delivers two books – The Debt and Jose’s still-undetermined priorities. ▲ Downtown Los Angeles California Ave. Atlantic Ave. Orange Ave. Walnut Ave. Cherry Ave. Los Angeles River 405 Long Beach Airport ▲ Spring St. Anaheim Pine Ave. Willow St. 710 City of Signal Hill Hill St. Pacific Coast Highway Median household Maria Guadalupe Quintero and Rosa Suarez, on income is below ZIP Code 90806 scooter, play at an apartment building. 90806 $34,614 Long Beach, Calif. has the city’s highest density of households with Highest density of children under age 4. households with Downtown Long Beach, Queen Mary, San Pedro Bay children under 4 ▲ 2001 ANNUAL REPORT 7
  10. 10. A COMMUNITY’S PERSPECTIVE The King Kong Studio on East Anaheim Street in Central Long Beach shows its patriotism. are not literate in their native tongue, Khmer. Twenty-five years ago, 90806 was mostly black, about 18 percent Asian-American, and Many witnessed the murder of loved ones and African-American. But as other low-income about 14 percent non-Hispanic white. are reticent to place their trust in anyone they groups have sought the more affordable rents One of the challenges of this shift to a do not know personally. Compared with other of Central Long Beach, many blacks have moved more Hispanic and Asian-American popula- ethnic populations in Los Angeles County, up the economic ladder – mirroring much of the tion is the large number of households where Cambodians have the lowest per capita rest of Los Angeles County. English is not the first language. In addition, income, the highest poverty rate, and the “The heart and soul of the black communi- serious gang-related problems have arisen highest unemployment rate in the county. ty are still in the central district, but we’re not over the last decade, including street battles “In a very small area we’ve got a lot of the the majority community there anymore,” said between Latino and Cambodian gangs that challenges of urban communities across the Bill Barnes, the retired executive dean of Long have abated somewhat recently. ZIP code country,” said Jim Worsham, a local business- Beach City College, Central Long Beach 90806 has the highest percentage of female- man and chair of Knight’s Long Beach adviso- native, and member of Knight’s Community led, single-parent households in the city, and ry committee. Advisory Committee. Now that blacks are 33 percent of the area’s 44,763 residents Yet “90806 has a lot of things going for it,” making greater inroads into the middle class, received public assistance in 1998. he said. For instance, Long Beach City Col- Barnes said, “there’s really a lot of dispersal About a quarter of the Cambodian popula- lege enlivens the economic and educational across town.” tion of Long Beach lives in 90806, and these prospects of the community. Several medical Like the rest of Long Beach, 90806 has no residents – driven from their native country by centers and other major employers are locat- majority ethnic group, but Hispanics now a regime that openly killed those who were ed in Central Long Beach. And many communi- make up about 44 percent of the population educated – have unique needs. Many emi- ▲ ty nonprofits are headquartered in the area. there. About 21 percent of the residents are grated from very rural areas of Cambodia and 8 JOHN S. JA M E S L . K N I G H T F O U N DAT I O N AND
  11. 11. COMMUNITY PARTNERS (See more about Williams’ work as a two weeks away, but she’s sharing Community Partners team, the next liaison on page 17 and in the online updates with other funders, any of day looms as an important deadline version of this annual report at www. whom could become future collabo- for submitting local recommenda- knightfdn. org.) rators. tions for funding providers directly ➢ Liaison Julie Tarr arrives in Miami ➢ Meanwhile, John Bare, Knight’s serving the neediest people in on a flight from Philadelphia in ad- director of program development Knight communities – the goal of vance of two weeks of training, learn- and evaluation, is in Washington, the foundation’s $10 million Sept. 11 ing and research set aside for the along with Liz Sklaroff and Heidi Fund. whole Partners crew. At her working Rettig, two members of his team. A lunch, she’ll find out more about a priority for the day is finishing an This whirlwind day is a pretty good sophisticated public awareness cam- electronic tool kit that will provide snapshot of Knight Foundation’s new paign in South Florida targeting Knight communities with sum- and developing Community Partners early childhood development – an maries of tested and promising prac- Program. And it’s an indication of just area of direct relevance to Knight tices others have used to secure safe, how much has changed in our organi- committees in Philadelphia and State affordable housing for low-income zation and in the world we serve as a College. residents. Other meetings involve local funder. Based on a five-year strate- ➢ In Miami, liaison Suzette Prude similar summaries designed to help gic plan adopted by Knight trustees in attends a board meeting of a local communities boost arts participa- late 2000, the foundation’s fundamental funders’ association at mid-after- tion and ensure the positive devel- approach to grant making is being dra- noon. Her orientation session with opment of adolescents. matically reshaped, one typical Valen- ➢ And for each member of the ▲ the Miami advisory committee is tine’s Day at a time. A mural on Chestnut Avenue has a multicultural theme. One-third of the 44,763 residents of 90806 in Long Beach received public assistance in 1998. 2001 ANNUAL REPORT 9
  12. 12. A COMMUNITY’S PERSPECTIVE Daniel Melena plays outside an apartment on Chestnut Avenue. 90806 has the city’s highest percentage of female-led, single-parent households. It is these twin characteristics – high needs effective and affordable child care while the school readiness as its priority. combined with community resources – that parents are in class or working – and that’s “The most important time in a person’s life led Knight’s Community Advisory Committee where the Long Beach advisory committee is ages 0 to 5,” said Dr. Sue Stanley, chair of to zero in on 90806 as a densely populated, decided to step in. the Department of Family and Consumer diverse and well-defined community with Building on Knight Foundation’s emphasis Sciences at Cal State University, Long Beach. great opportunities. on outcomes, the committee felt “it would “It is extremely important that children are As an example of the needs and resources make sense to pick one area of extraordinary exposed to developmentally appropriate activ- in 90806, a workforce development initiative need and focus on that,” said Larry Allison, ities” at this early age. has brought together several funding organi- editor of the Long Beach Press-Telegram and a Based on the committee’s recommenda- zations – including Knight Foundation – and member of the advisory committee. The idea tions, Knight’s initial efforts in 90806 are like- nonprofit agencies to improve residents’ eco- is that by focusing on a specific need in a ly to include outreach to help home child-care nomic prospects in the ZIP code. The initia- well-defined geographic area, the committee providers include more learning activities for tive, building on welfare-to-work activities, will be better able to monitor the outcomes of the infants and toddlers under their care; test- provides low-income residents, most of its efforts over time. Given the specific needs ing whether stipends and other incentives can whom are single mothers who do not speak of the residents in 90806, the gaps in funding keep child-care professionals in the field; and English, with workforce training, English there currently, and recent research showing helping parents not fluent in English learn how classes, literacy skills and employment expe- the correlation of early childhood education to to engage their children in literacy activities. rience. But one piece that has been missing is later success, the committee centered on “The thinking is that if you can get young- 10 JOHN S. JA M E S L . K N I G H T F O U N DAT I O N AND
  13. 13. COMMUNITY PARTNERS We believe our best chance to suc- prospective funding partners, research viable choice.” ceed is by supporting Knight commu- ing local conditions, and developing The committees are recommending nities over the long haul as they work to grant proposals with them. Collective- funding priorities. Before the end of meet and measure their own definitions ly, the committees and staff and part- 2002, each advisory committee and its of community vitality. Our funding ners are inventing a way of operating as assigned liaison will have had at least interests remain closely tied to our a local funder unlike any national foun- one discussion of community priori- founders’ beliefs that our communities dation in America. ties, concentrating on just a few highly all have a stake in education, the well- While we expect the full rollout to specific needs and how Knight and our being of children and families, housing take three years, the Community Part- eventual partners, the grant recipients, and community development, eco- ners Program is well along in imple- can take multiple approaches to address- nomic development, the vitality of cul- menting the trustees’ vision. ing them. Updates on priorities are avail- tural life, and civic engagement and We’ve created Community Advisory able at www.knightfdn.org. positive human relations. Committees. From Philadelphia to San The discussions lead to fascinating Knight trustees intend to invest at Jose, we have established local commit- directions. Take State College, located least $300 million in the 26 Knight tees, each made up of community, busi- in Happy Valley, home of Penn State communities through 2005. Part of that ness and nonprofit leaders well aware of University and its steady supply of investment is human capital. We have local conditions and the need to set pri- intellect, employment, culture and dedicated eight liaison officers to work orities. services. “We have an embarrassment of in the 26 Knight communities. Residents One example: Bill Barnes, the retired riches,” admits Bill Jaffe, a retired man- may see them speak at the Rotary Club, executive dean of Long Beach City agement consultant. Meeting in the meet them at the local diner, get a call College, grew up in the Central Long pre-9/11 world of Sept. 6, committee from them as part of local research. Beach neighborhood where Knight is members agree theirs is an above-aver- Each liaison is an on-the-ground repre- concentrating its efforts in school readi- age place; identifying a consensus com- sentative of the foundation, working ness (see page 6). “We’ve got to make it munity priority isn’t obvious. ▲ closely with our committees, identifying work,” he says. “We don’t have any other Yet the discussion takes an impor- sters ready for school then they have a much better chance to negotiate the system,” said Barnes, who suggested that there’s also more at stake than schooling: “Education has always been the key to freedom and equality.” These projects are just under way, but the findings may prove useful to diverse commu- nities beyond 90806. Central Long Beach, Barnes said, has “four major ethnic groups: Latino-American, Asian-American, blacks, and whites. We’ve got to make it work. We don’t have any other viable choice.” ★ Raul Olvera’s costume and pizza box attract passersby to the Long Beach outlet of La Pizza Loca, a chain catering to Hispanics. In 90806, 44 percent of residents are Hispanic. 2001 ANNUAL REPORT 11
  14. 14. A PARTNER’S PERSPECTIVE What’s Different About This Process? tion, the communities it serves, its potential partners and prospective grantees. I’m happy to live in Charlotte. According to the 2000 census, our fast-growing region is home to nearly 84,000 children under age 6. As the most populous county in the region, Mecklenburg is home to slightly more than 72 percent of them. Mecklenburg also faces the challenge of being home to more poor children than any other county in North Carolina. At state and local levels, we’ve seen sig- nificant public and private resources focused on maximizing the window of opportunity in children’s earliest years, from birth to 5, to pre- pare them for success in school and in life. The state’s Smart Start school readiness initia- tive and Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools’ Bright Beginnings program for educationally at-risk 4-year-old children are heralded nationally. Major community funders and the local cham- ber of commerce are investing in early child- hood initiatives. Despite this unprecedented support, the region still faces enormous chal- lenges in ensuring the quality of learning for young children. It was welcome news, then, to learn from Susan that Knight Foundation’s Community Advisory Committee in Charlotte had identified school readiness as one of its local priorities. A few weeks later, Susan came to my office to listen to my perspectives on the topic. I shared my concern that the child-care system, which serves children from birth throughout their most critical brain develop- ment years, remains severely underfinanced at the same time public pre-kindergarten pro- grams for that age group are attracting signif- icant national, state and local investments. Unlike the public funding that supports school Child-care teacher Hermelinda Byron and center director Ruth Slim, back row, join Janet Singerman of systems, the child-care system’s financing is Child Care Resources, right, on the steps of a downtown Charlotte day care. With them are preschool- largely determined by what parents of young ers Billy Pickens, rear center; Adrian Cruz-Cordero, foreground; and Sona Suryedevara. children can afford. These parents are typical- ly in their earliest earning years during their Janet Singerman is president of Child Care Although I knew something of the founda- children’s earliest learning years. Their ability Resources Inc., an agency that has worked for tion’s work in Charlotte and our agency had to pay rarely meets the cost of producing the nearly 20 years to improve the quality of early received a grant several years ago, I had not high quality child care that research has care and education resources for children and met Susan and didn’t quite understand her repeatedly shown positively affects children’s families in Mecklenburg, Union and Cabarrus new role as a community liaison. school readiness. counties in North Carolina. Although I’ve crafted proposals that Soon after our meeting, Susan called and secured multimillion-dollar funding commit- asked me to outline briefly a few promising It all began with an unexpected phone call ments, I had never experienced a program strategies to improve the school readiness of in October from Susan Patterson of Knight that raises to such high levels the concept and children in child-care settings. Although I did Foundation’s Community Partners Program. practice of partnering – among the founda- not know it at the time, the call was the point 12 JOHN S. JA M E S L . K N I G H T F O U N DAT I O N AND
  15. 15. COMMUNITY PARTNERS tant turn when members try to identify We’re finding partners and devel- not encountered a funder so willing to the root causes of community need. oping grants. In the dozen or so Knight listen. Nonprofit executive Katherine Genovese communities where priorities had been “I had never experienced a program cites a litany of related social ills that established as 2002 began, we are en- that raises to such high levels the con- service providers treat: inadequate edu- gaged in grant development. That means cept and practice of partnering – among cation, the risk of pregnancy, drug and we’re determining the area in which com- the foundation, the communities it alcohol abuse, low expectations. It munities believe the foundation can serves, its potential partners and pros- seems the people with the greatest make the most difference, setting meas- pective grantees,” she writes (see facing needs for such services are Centre urable goals that allow our partners to page). County’s educated but underemployed track progress, drawing on examples of We’re monitoring and participat- residents living “over the mountain” – tested and promising practices, assessing ing in the first partnerships formed in away from town and campus, unaware the ability of communities to launch and the Partners program. In five commu- of available services or unwilling to use sustain programs, and building in feed- nities – Long Beach, Charlotte, Grand them. “They’re off the radar screen,” back and monitoring systems that help Forks, Milledgeville and Fort Wayne – says Jaffe. The committee recommends our partners get the evidence they need projects funded in December 2001 are researching ways to stabilize these at- to mark success and make adjustments under way. They address a range of issues risk, underemployed families, with an when things get off track. associated with Knight funding interests, emphasis on a better future for children Until Janet Singerman of Child Care among them school readiness in Long who otherwise might never emerge Resources started talking to liaison Beach, Fort Wayne and Charlotte; im- from what committee member Chuck Susan Patterson about the early child- proved cultural opportunities for the un- ▲ Curley calls “the hidden population.” hood situation in Charlotte, she had derserved in Fort Wayne; economic at which the partnering between the founda- ing majority of programs in Mecklenburg don’t tion and Child Care Resources really began. use one. Through Curriculum Matters, our Par kwo od Av e As I shared my organization’s ideas for strate- newest Knight-funded initiative, we’ll select . 77 Downtown gic school readiness investment, the founda- 10 child-care programs to use a promising, Charlotte, N.C. tion’s staff worked with us to whittle down developmentally appropriate curriculum for Ericsson Stadium the list. We soon reached consensus about the next five years. You see, while other fac- South End our most promising and affordable strategy tors that contribute to quality programs are St. and from that point on, Knight staff asked the governed by cost and regulation, a child-care on 277 Tr y 4t tough questions that helped us craft a propos- program’s willingness to stick to a curriculum h St ★ . al that would gain the foundation’s support. and engage families is a matter of choice and Child Care Resources So often, due to the competitive nature of intent. We’ll measure rigorously to note if cur- e. 700 Kenilworth Ave. Av th grant awards, it’s rare to have extensive dia- riculum makes a difference for those who or lw Carolinas ni logue with a prospective funder while working haven’t used one. Medical Center Ke on a final grant submission. The grant-seeker What is particularly exciting about part- is typically held at arm’s length so as not to nering with Knight Foundation is its commit- influence the funder’s decision. What’s differ- ment to fund both the improvement of local ent about this process? Once the local Knight practice and the collection of evaluative data committee expressed its support for our con- to help inform local and state policy develop- cept, the conversation between the founda- ment. tion and Child Care Resources enabled us to Here’s one final piece of evidence to work “in the light” in a mutually beneficial demonstrate how differently Knight approach- manner. es grant making: It was actually the founda- And what did we create together? tion’s idea to extend the project’s time frame Something to confront this distressing fact: from three to five years to ensure its success Despite research that proves sticking to a in terms of practice, evaluation and ability to inform public policy. ★ good curriculum is one of several factors play- ing into high quality child care, an overwhelm- 2001 ANNUAL REPORT 13
  16. 16. AN ADVISER’S PERSPECTIVE ‘Not Enough Heads for All the Hats‘ With the Sorlie Bridge linking Grand Forks, N.D., and East Grand Forks, Minn., in the background, Knight Trustee Mike Maidenberg is flanked by Community Advisory Committee members Sheila Gerszewski of Grand Forks and Dr. Steve Gander of East Grand Forks. Michael Maidenberg is president and publisher nities on the Northern Plains, we are faced important media voice and as an individual of the Grand Forks Herald, and a Knight with stagnating population, caused mainly by deeply involved in civic causes. Foundation trustee. out-migration. But unlike other places, the To be sure, this multiplicity of roles gave Grand Cities feel the lingering impact of the me unusual perspective on how Knight When a key finding was described as “Not 1997 flood and fire, and the 1998 downsizing Foundation’s new strategy might play out in enough heads for all the hats,” I could only of Grand Forks Air Force Base. In pinpointing the “Grand Cities” of Grand Forks, N.D., and smile in agreement. It was June 7, 2001, and a this goal, the advisory committee had argued East Grand Forks, Minn., along with their sur- remarkable initiative was coming together. that only by increasing incomes would the rounding regions. While many in the room wore multiple hats, community be able to increase its population But the challenge was to move from per- mine were unique to the occasion. base in an economically positive way that spective to projects worthy of funding. That As a trustee of Knight Foundation, I had a also improved our quality of life. required listening closely to community lead- hand in crafting and approving our new Economic development is addressed by ers, applying expert insight to the findings, Community Partners Program strategy. As the many local organizations. How could Knight then seeking out those organizations that adviser in Grand Forks, I would help translate Foundation contribute? could bring the energy and focus needed to this new way of doing things to a new To find the answer required three crucial create grants aimed at the overarching goals Community Advisory Committee, which I actions: we had set for ourselves. would chair. As longtime publisher of the First, the foundation needed to work with The foundation’s top priority for the Grand Grand Forks Herald, I have a role within the the local economic development corporation, Cities is economic development, defined as Grand Forks region as leader of its most or EDC. The Grand Forks Region EDC was increasing family income. Like most commu- 14 JOHN S. JA M E S L . K N I G H T F O U N DAT I O N AND

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