17Contents On the Road                4    Activities                                 New York for Children               ...
18   CONTENTSRHODE ISLAND                274    Eastern Shore               350     North Georgia             451Providenc...
CONTENTS        19St Petersburg               541   MINNESOTA                  636   Parks & Wildlife              708Sara...
20   CONTENTSMissoula                   805Flathead Lake              806   California              909       North Coast ...
CONTENTS          21Admiralty Island                                  Southeast Oʻahu            1117                     ...
4On the Road                                                                        SARA BENSON                           ...
5MICHAEL GROSBERG Even on a soggy day, work calls. I bravedthe approaching storm to take a canoe out on the dark watersof ...
6                                      BRENDAN SAINSBURY I thought                                      I’d seen it all bu...
22                            Destination USA                                       Regis St. Louis                       ...
lonelyplanet.com                                                              D E S T I N AT I O N U S A   23foreign born ...
24   D E S T I N AT I O N U S A                                                         lonelyplanet.com                  ...
25Getting StartedGot your map? Ready to plot out your road trip? Just remember: the USAcovers a continent and more. Texas ...
26      G E T T I N G S TA R T E D • • T r a v e l i n g R e s p o n s i b l y                 lonelyplanet.com      DON’T...
lonelyplanet.com                                                G E T T I N G S TA R T E D • • T r a v e l i n g R e s p o...
28   G E T T I N G S TA R T E D • • T o p Te n                                                    lonelyplanet.com        ...
lonelyplanet.com                                                   G E T T I N G S TA R T E D • • T o p Te n   29  TOP    ...
30   G E T T I N G S TA R T E D • • T o p Te n                                         lonelyplanet.com TOP              1...
lonelyplanet.com                                                      G E T T I N G S TA R T E D • • T o p Te n   31  TOP ...
32   G E T T I N G S TA R T E D • • T r a v e l L i t e r a t u re                                       lonelyplanet.com ...
33ItinerariesCLASSIC ROUTES                                                                                               ...
34     ITINERARIES •• Classic Routes                                                                           lonelyplane...
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  1. 1. 17Contents On the Road 4 Activities New York for Children 175 176 Tours 176 Festivals & Events 176 USA Itineraries 7 Sleeping 177 Eating 180 Destination USA 22 Drinking Entertainment 185 186 Shopping 190 Getting Started 25 Getting There & Away 190 Getting Around 191 NEW YORK STATE 192 Itineraries 33 Long Island 193 Hudson Valley 196 USA Road Trips 44 Catskills Finger Lakes Region 197 198 Albany 199 History 51 Around Albany The Adirondacks 200 201 Thousand Islands Region 202 The Culture 65 Western New York NEW JERSEY 203 206 Northern New Jersey 206 Arts 75 Central New Jersey 208 Jersey Shore 208 South Jersey 210 Food & Drink 93 PENNSYLVANIA 212 Philadelphia 213 Around Philadelphia 226 USA’s Pennsylvania Dutch Country 228 National Parks 105 South Central Pennsylvania 229 Northeastern Pennsylvania 229 Environment 121 Pittsburgh Around Pittsburgh 230 236 Northwestern Pennsylvania 237 USA Outdoors 131 New England 238 New York, History 239 Local Culture 239 New Jersey & Pennsylvania 143 Land & Climate Parks 239 239 History 144 Information 242 Land & Climate 144 Getting There & Around 242 Parks & Wildlife 144 MASSACHUSETTS 243 Information 144 Boston 243 Getting There & Around 145 Around Boston 259 NEW YORK CITY 145 Cape Cod 260 History 145 Nantucket 267 Orientation 148 Martha’s Vineyard 268 Information 149 Central Massachusetts 271 Sights 151 The Berkshires 273
  2. 2. 18 CONTENTSRHODE ISLAND 274 Eastern Shore 350 North Georgia 451Providence 275 Ocean City 351 Central Georgia 452Newport 276 Western Maryland 353 Savannah 453Rhode Island Beaches 279 DELAWARE 354 Brunswick &CONNECTICUT 279 Delaware Beaches 355 the Golden Isles 457Connecticut Coast 281 Northern & ALABAMA 459Lower Connecticut Central Delaware 357 Birmingham 460River Valley 282 VIRGINIA 358 Around Birmingham 461Hartford 283 Northern Virginia 359 Montgomery 462Litchfield Hills 284 Fredericksburg 361 Selma 463VERMONT 285 Richmond 362 Mobile 463Southern Vermont 285 Petersburg 367 Dauphin Island 463Central Vermont 289 Historic Triangle 367 MISSISSIPPI 464Northern Vermont 290 Hampton Roads 370 Tupelo 464Burlington 292 Virginia Beach 372 Oxford 464NEW HAMPSHIRE 294 The Piedmont 373 Mississippi Delta 465Portsmouth 295 Shenandoah Valley 375 Jackson 468Manchester 296 Blue Ridge Highlands & Natchez 470Concord 296 Southwest Virginia 378 Gulf Coast 470Lake Winnipesaukee 296 WEST VIRGINIA 380 LOUISIANA 471White Mountains 297 Eastern Panhandle 381Hanover 301 New Orleans 472 Monongahela Around New Orleans 486MAINE 301 National Forest 382Southern Maine Coast 302 Cajun Country 489 Morgantown 382Portland 305 Cane River Country 492 Southern West Virginia 383Central Maine Coast 307 Northern Louisiana 493 ARKANSAS 493Acadia National ParkBar Harbor 310 311 The South 385 Little Rock 494Downeast Maine 312 History 388 Hot Springs 495Interior Maine 312 Local Culture 388 Around Hot Springs 496 Land & Climate 388 Arkansas River Valley 497Washington, DC & Parks & Wildlife 389 Ozark Mountains 497the Capital Region 315 Information 389 Arkansas Delta 499 Getting There & Around 389HistoryLocal Culture 316 316 NORTH CAROLINA 389 Florida 500Land & Climate 317 North Carolina Coast 390 History 501Parks & Wildlife 317 The Triangle 395 Local Culture 501Information 317 Charlotte 398 Land & Climate 501Getting There & Around 317 North Carolina Mountains 400 Parks & Wildlife 504WASHINGTON, DC 318 SOUTH CAROLINA 403 Information 504History 319 Charleston 404 Getting There & Around 504Orientation 320 Around Charleston 411 SOUTH FLORIDA 505Information 320 Sea Islands 412 Miami 505Sights 321 North Coast 413 Fort Lauderdale 517Activities 330 Columbia 414 Palm Beach & Around 518Washington, DC, for Children 330 TENNESSEE 415 The Everglades 519Tours 331 Memphis 416 Around the Everglades 522Festivals & Events 331 Shiloh National Military Park 423 Florida Keys 523Sleeping 331 Nashville 423 ATLANTIC COAST 532Eating 332 Eastern Tennessee 431 Space Coast 532Drinking & Entertainment 335 KENTUCKY 435 Daytona Beach 534Getting There & Away 337 Louisville 435 St Augustine 536Getting Around 338 Bluegrass Country 437 Jacksonville 537MARYLAND 338 Central Kentucky 439 Amelia Island 538Baltimore 339 GEORGIA 441 WEST COAST 539Annapolis 348 Atlanta 442 Tampa 539
  3. 3. CONTENTS 19St Petersburg 541 MINNESOTA 636 Parks & Wildlife 708Sarasota 543 Minneapolis 636 Information 708Fort Myers 544 St Paul 643 Getting There & Around 709Fort Myers Beach 544 Around Minneapolis–St Paul 645 SOUTH-CENTRAL TEXAS 709Sanibel & Captiva Islands 544 Southern Minnesota 645 Austin 709CENTRAL FLORIDA 545 Northern Minnesota 646 Around Austin 717Orlando 545 Hill Country 717Walt Disney WorldAround Central Florida 548 550 Great Plains 651 San Antonio Houston 720 725 History 654FLORIDA PANHANDLE 550 Around Houston 731 Local Culture 654Tallahassee 551 SOUTHERN GULF COAST 732 Land & Climate 654Panama City Beach 552 Aransas National Parks & Wildlife 654 Wildlife Refuge 733Pensacola 553 Getting There & Around 654 Corpus Christi & Around 733Great Lakes 555 MISSOURI St Louis 655 656 South Padre Island 734History 557 The Valley 734 Around St Louis 663 DALLAS–FORT WORTH 734Local Culture 558 The Ozarks 664Land & Climate 558 Dallas 734 Kansas City 665 Around Dallas 741Parks & Wildlife 559 Around Kansas City 668 Fort Worth 741Information 559 IOWA 669Getting There & Around 559 PANHANDLE PLAINS 744 Des Moines 670 Amarillo 744ILLINOIS 559 Around Des Moines 671 WEST TEXAS 745Chicago 559 Along I-80 671 Big Bend 746Around Chicago 587 Along US 30 672 El Paso 751Northern Illinois 587 Along US 20 672 Hueco Tanks StateCentral Illinois 588 NORTH DAKOTA 673 Historic Site 752Southern Illinois 589 Along I-94 674 Guadalupe MountainsINDIANA 591 National Park 753 Along US 2 676Indianapolis 591Around Indianapolis 594 SOUTH DAKOTA Sioux Falls 676 677 Rocky Mountains 754Southern Indiana 595 History 755 Around Sioux Falls 677Northern Indiana 596 Local Culture 755 Along I-90 677OHIO 597 Land & Climate 758 Black Hills 680Cleveland 598 Parks & Wildlife 758 NEBRASKA 685Around Cleveland 602 Getting There & Around 758 Omaha 686Erie Lakeshore & Islands 602 COLORADO 760 Lincoln 687Amish Country 603 Denver 760 Along I-80 688Columbus 604 Front Range 766 Along US 20 688Southeastern Ohio 605 Central Mountain Region 778 KANSAS 689Dayton & Yellow Springs 606 Southern Colorado 784 Wichita 690Cincinnati 606 WYOMING 790 Along I-70 691MICHIGAN 611 Cheyenne 791 Along US 50 694Detroit 611 Laramie 792 Along US 56 694Around Detroit 617 Cody 792 OKLAHOMA 695Central Michigan 619 Lander 793 Oklahoma City 695Lake Michigan Shore 619 Yellowstone National Park 793 Around Oklahoma City 699Straits of Mackinac 622 Grand Teton National Park 798 Western Oklahoma 700Upper Peninsula 624 Jackson 799 Tulsa 700WISCONSIN 626 MONTANA 800Milwaukee 627 Green Country 702 Bozeman 801MadisonSouthern Wisconsin 630 632 Texas 704 Gallatin & Paradise Valleys Absaroka Beartooth 803Along the Mississippi River 633 History 705 Wilderness 803Eastern Wisconsin 633 Local Culture 705 Billings 804Northern Wisconsin 635 Land & Climate 708 Helena 804
  4. 4. 20 CONTENTSMissoula 805Flathead Lake 806 California 909 North Coast Sacramento 995 999Bob Marshall History 912 Gold Country 1000Wilderness Complex 806 Local Culture 913 Northern Mountains 1002Whitefish 806 Land & Climate 913 SIERRA NEVADA 1004Glacier National Park 808 Parks & Wildlife 913 Lake Tahoe 1004IDAHO 810 Information 914 Yosemite National Park 1006Boise 810 Getting There & Around 914 Sequoia & Kings CanyonKetchum & Sun Valley 812 LOS ANGELES 914 National Parks 1010Hwy 75: Ketchum to Stanley 813 Orientation 915 Eastern Sierra 1012Stanley 813 Information 915Hwy 21: Stanley to Boise 814 Sights 918 Pacific Northwest 1014Hells Canyon National Activities 928Recreation Area 815 History 1015 Los Angeles for Children 929 Local Culture 1015Idaho Panhandle 816 Tours 929 Land & Climate 1018 Festivals & Events 929Southwest 817 Sleeping 929 Parks & Wildlife Information 1019 1019History 820 Eating 931 Getting There & Around 1019Local Culture 820 Drinking 933 WASHINGTON 1020Land & Climate 820 Entertainment 934 Seattle 1021Parks 821 Shopping 935 Around Seattle 1033Information 821 Getting There & Away 936 Olympic Peninsula 1034Getting There & Around 821 Getting Around 936 Northwest Washington 1037NEVADA 821 AROUND LOS ANGELES 937 San Juan Islands 1038Las Vegas 822 Catalina Island 937 North Cascades 1040Around Las Vegas 833 Six Flags Magic Mountain 937 Northeastern Washington 1041Western Nevada 834 SOUTHERN South Cascades 1043Nevada Great Basin 837 CALIFORNIA COAST 938 Central & SoutheasternARIZONA 838 Orange County 938 Washington 1044Phoenix 839 San Diego 939 OREGON 1045Central Arizona 847 Around San Diego 948 Portland 1046Grand Canyon National Park 851 CALIFORNIA DESERTS 949 Around Portland 1058Around the Grand Canyon 856 Palm Springs 949 Willamette Valley 1058Northeastern Arizona 856 Joshua Tree National Park 951 Columbia River Gorge 1060Western Arizona 859 Anza-Borrego Desert Oregon Cascades 1061 State Park 952Tuscon 860 Southern Oregon 1064 Mojave National Preserve 953Around Tuscon 864 Eastern Oregon 1066 Death Valley National Park 954Southeastern Corner 865 CENTRAL COAST 956 Oregon Coast 1068UTAH 866 Santa Barbara 956Salt Lake CityAround Salt Lake City 867 873 Santa Barbara to San Luis Obispo 958 Alaska 1071Wasatch Mountains & San Luis Obispo 959 History 1074North 874 Local Culture 1074 Morro Bay to Hearst Castle 959Northeastern Utah 876 Land & Climate 1075 Big Sur 960Southeastern Utah 877 Parks & Wildlife 1076 Carmel 961South-Central & Information 1076Southwestern Utah 881 Monterey 962 Santa Cruz 964 Activities 1076NEW MEXICO 885 Getting There & Around 1076Albuquerque 886 Santa Cruz to San Francisco 966 SAN FRANCISCO & SOUTHEAST ALASKA 1078Along I-40 891 THE BAY AREA 966 Ketchikan 1078Santa Fe 892 San Francisco 966 Around Ketchikan 1079Around Santa Fe 898 Marin County 988 Wrangell 1079Taos 899 Berkeley 989 Petersburg 1080Northeastern New Mexico 902 NORTHERN CALIFORNIA 990 Sitka 1080Southeastern New Mexico 905 Wine Country 991 Juneau 1081
  5. 5. CONTENTS 21Admiralty Island Southeast Oʻahu 1117 LANAʻI 1129National Monument 1083 Windward Coast 1117 OTHER ISLANDS 1130Glacier Bay North Shore 1118 Kahoʻolawe 1130National Park & Preserve 1083 Waiʻanae Coast 1118 Niʻihau 1130Haines 1084 HAWAIʻI THE BIG ISLAND 1118 PapahanaumokuakeaAround Haines 1085 Marine National Kailua-Kona 1118Skagway 1085 Monument 1130 South Kona Coast 1119SOUTHCENTRAL North Kona &ALASKAAnchorage 1086 1086 Kohala Coasts Waimea 1120 1120 Directory 1131Around Anchorage 1092 Mauna Kea 1120Kenai Peninsula 1093 Hamakua Coast 1121 Transportation 1152Prince William Sound 1095 Hilo 1121Kodiak Island 1098DENALI & THE INTERIOR 1098 Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park 1122 Health 1168Denali National Park 1099 MAUI 1123George Parks HwyFairbanks 1100 1101 Lahaina & Kaʻanapali Maʻalaea Bay 1123 1124 Glossary 1172THE BUSH 1103 Kihei 1124 Wailea & Makena 1125 The Authors 1176Hawaii 1104 Kahului & Wailuku 1125 Behind the Scenes 1182 Paʻia 1126History 1105 Hana & Around 1126Local Culture 1105 Haleakalā National Park 1127Land & Climate 1108Parks 1108 KAUAʻI Lihuʻe 1127 1127 Index 1187Information 1109 Wailua & Around 1127Getting There & AroundOʻAHU 1109 1109 Na Pali Coast & North Shore 1128 Greendex 1212 South Shore 1128Honolulu & Waikiki 1109 West Side 1129Pearl Harbor 1117 MOLOKAʻI 1129 Map Legend 1216Regional Map Contents ME WA PACIFIC NEW MT NEW YORK, VT ENGLAND NORTHWEST ND NEW JERSEY & NH pp1016-17 pp240-1 ROCKY PENNSYLVANIA MA MN pp146-7 NY CT RI OR MOUNTAINS WI ID pp756-7 SD MI PA NJ WY GREAT LAKES NE IA pp556-7 OH MD DE NV UT IL IN GREAT PLAINS WV WASHINGTON, DC CA pp652-3 VA & THE CAPITAL REGION SOUTHWEST CO pp318-19 KS MO KY CALIFORNIA pp818-19 NC pp910-11 TN SC OK THE SOUTH AZ AR NM pp386-7 MS AL GA TX LA AK TEXAS FLORIDA ALASKA pp706-7 pp502-3 pp1072-3 FL HI HAWAII pp1106-7
  6. 6. 4On the Road SARA BENSON Coordinating Author Having visited the Sierra Nevada before in every season except winter, I hadn’t ex- pected to see such thundering waterfalls pouring down into Yosemite Valley (p1006) in March, along with a winter wonderland of snow, perfect for skiing. Even better, trails with almost no people on them! That rarely happens here. AMY C BALFOUR I’m standing on the patio of the View Hotel at Monument Valley Navajo Tribal Park (p858), soaking in the awesomeness of the landscape. Behind me there’s a fun 17-mile driving loop around the colossal formations.BECCA BLOND I’m on the road forLonely Planet a lot, which doesn’tmake my oversized bulldog Dukehappy. So when I get to writeabout my Colorado backyard, hefollows me everywhere – includ-ing onto this bench. My husbandsnapped this picture on a cloud-less April morning at our Boulderhome as I soaked up the rays andwrote up my notes. LISA DUNFORD A family was NED FRIARY & GLENDA sticking their feet in the hot- BENDURE Walking into Burling- spring ‘hot tub’ in an old foun- ton’s Magic Hat Brewery (p293) dation ruin when we arrived on reminds us of an amusement- a surprisingly cool May morn- park fun house, but they do ing (77°F) in Big Bend (p746). take their beer seriously here. After they’d gone, we had a After all, Vermont has more perfect moment of steaming microbreweries per capita than water, refreshing breeze and any other state in the USA. the rushing sound of the Rio Don’t think we’ll manage to get Grande below. to them all…
  7. 7. 5MICHAEL GROSBERG Even on a soggy day, work calls. I bravedthe approaching storm to take a canoe out on the dark watersof Lake Mohonk (p196). You can’t see them but I also had tobrave three other canoes with water-fighting teenagers onboard. ADAM KARLIN I figured I’d combine the disparate ele- ments of my research for this picture: me in a Coop’s T-shirt from New Orleans (p472), sitting on my buddy’s pickup truck in Washington, DC (p318). I love both cities, and I’m thrilled I got to cover each of them for this book.MARIELLA KRAUSE I happenedto be in Key West during thethree weeks the USS Vandenberg(p528) was docked there, rightbefore it was sunk 7 miles offthe coast to create anartificial reef. It was humongous!My new goal? Learn to scubadive so I can go back and see itunderwater. JOSH KRIST This self-portrait is at the edge of the Grand Canyon (p851). One of the highlights of my life was watching a black cloud full of lightning sparking over the middle of the canyon, slowly approaching as I stood on the South Rim. I could smell the scent of imminent rain and felt a charge in the air. EMILY MATCHAR Here’s Emily at Lake Mattamuskeet, in eastern North Carolina, not too far from the Outer Banks (p391). Eighteen inches deep! And no, she still can’t spell ‘Mattamuskeet.’
  8. 8. 6 BRENDAN SAINSBURY I thought I’d seen it all but I hadn’t. Even in a region as jaw-droppingly spectacular as the Pacific North- west, Crater Lake (p1064) appears like a jolting epiphany, defying every cliché you’ve ever heard about it.CÉSAR SORIANO I’ve been pick-ing Maryland blue crabs (p351)as long as I can remember. It’smessy, time-consuming, dan-gerous work, but it’s all worthit once you taste that delicate, ELLEE THALHEIMER One rainy afternoon in Hot Springs (p495), AR,sweet, buttery flesh, seasoned I decided it was time to dig into some crawfish boil. Our waiterwith lots of Old Bay spice and obligingly taught us how to traditionally gut the little guys andaccompanied by corn on the heartily suck their delicious juices from every nook and crack. Thiscob and cold beer. It tastes like – is not a first-date activity.home. RYAN VER BERKMOES The joy of driving the myriad two-laners across the Great Plains is that you never know what surprise you’ll find. Here on a lonely stretch of US 30 somewhere east of Kearney (p688) in Nebraska I found my future selling used cars.KARLA ZIMMERMAN Me and Abe share a moment at the Henry FordMuseum (p617) in Dearborn, MI. Lincoln is the Midwest’s main man,and shrines pop up throughout the Midwest. The Ford containsthe chair he was sitting in when assassinated. Oddly, that’s not theimage they use for marketing in the gift shop. For full author biographies see p1176.
  9. 9. 22 Destination USA Regis St. Louis The playwright Arthur Miller once said that the essence of America was its promise. For newly arrived immigrants and jet-lagged travelers alike, that promise of America can take on near mythic proportions. America is a land of dazzling cities, towering coast redwoods, alpine lakes, rolling vineyards, chiseled peaks, barren deserts and a dramatic coastline of unrivaled beauty. And that’s just one state (California). In the other 49 lie an astounding collection of natural and cultural won- ders, from the wildly multihued tapestry of urban streets to the mountains, plains and forests that cover vast swaths of the continent. America is the birthplace of LA, Las Vegas, Chicago, Miami, Boston and New York City – each a brimming metropolis whose name alone conjures a million different notions of culture, cuisine and entertainment. Look more closely, and the American quilt unfurls in all its surprising va- riety: the eclectic music scene of Austin, the easygoing charms of antebellum Savannah, the ecoconsciousness of free-spirited Portland, the magnificent waterfront of San Francisco, and the captivating old quarters of New Orleans, still rising up from its waterlogged ashes. This is a country of road trips and great open skies, where four millionFAST FACTS miles of highways lead past red-rock deserts, below towering mountainPopulation: 306 million peaks, and across fertile wheat fields that roll off toward the horizon. TheGross Domestic Product sun-bleached hillsides of the Great Plains, the lush forests of the Pacific(GDP): $14.1 trillion Northwest and the scenic country lanes of New England are a few fine start- ing points for the great American road trip.Barrels of oil consumed The world’s third-largest nation has made substantial contributions todaily: 21 million the arts. Georgia O’Keeffe’s wild landscapes, Robert Rauschenberg’s surrealTotal hybrid cars sold in collages, Alexander Calder’s elegant mobiles and Jackson Pollock’s drip2008: 308,000 paintings have entered the vernacular of modern 20th-century art. CitiesTV channels in an such as Chicago and New York have become veritable drawing boards foraverage US home: 118.6 the great architects of the modern era. Musically speaking, America has few peers on the world stage. From the big-band jazz that was born in NewStates in which gay Orleans, to the Memphis blues, Detroit’s Motown sound, plus funk, hip-hop,marriage is legal: 6 country, and rock and roll – America has invented sounds that are integralBiggest city by to contemporary music.population: New York Cuisine is another way of illuminating the American experience. OnCity, NY (8.3 million one evening in the US, thick barbecue ribs and sizzling meats arrive freshpeople; 469 sq mi) off the grill at a Tennessee roadhouse; over 2000 miles away, talented chefsBiggest city by area: blend organic, fresh-from-the-garden produce with Asian accents at award-Juneau, AK (31,000 winning West Coast restaurants. A smattering of locals get their fix of bagelspeople; 3248 sq mi) and lox at a century-old deli in Manhattan’s Upper West Side, while severalHottest temperature ever states away, plump pancakes and fried eggs disappear in a hurry under therecorded: 134°F (in Death clatter of cutlery at a 1950s-style diner. Steaming plates of fresh lobster servedValley, CA) off a Maine pier, oysters and champagne in a fashion-forward wine bar in California, beer and pizza at a Midwestern pub – these are just a few waysColdest temperature to dine à la Americana.ever recorded: -80°F But America isn’t just about its geography, its cities or even its art and cui-(in Alaska) sine. It’s also about people. The ‘teeming nation of nations’ (as Walt Whitman described it), was built on immigration and still attracts over one million new immigrants each year. Representatives from nearly every country can be found inside the boundaries of the USA, adding an astounding mix of ethnici- ties, religions and languages to the diverse American character. In one county alone (New York City’s borough of Queens), almost half of the residents are
  10. 10. lonelyplanet.com D E S T I N AT I O N U S A 23foreign born and speak some 138 languages. Although the topic of immigra-tion remains a heated one (historically, the subject has been a source of con-tention since the country’s inception), few Americans contest the enormouscontributions made by fresh-faced immigrants over the centuries. In addition to the wide mix of racial and ethnic groups, America is amishmash of factory workers and farmers, born-again Christians and Hathayoga practitioners, literary-minded college students, tradition-consciousNative Americans, beer-swilling baseball lovers and back-to-nature communedwellers. This is a country where regional stereotypes help Americans geta handle on their own elusive country, whether the people in question aregracious Southern belles, street-smart New Yorkers, humble Midwesterners,SoCal surfers or straight-talking Texans. The collective identity, however, goes only so far in defining Americans.This is, after all, a country that celebrates – or rather mythologizes – the featsof ‘rugged individualism’, a notion well supported by the enormous ranksof the great and dastardly alike that have left their mark on America. This is ‘Today’sthe land of Eleanor Roosevelt, John Muir, Diane Arbus, Jack Kerouac, FrankLloyd Wright, Elvis Presley and Amelia Earhart. It is also the birthplace of stars…helpBilly the Kid, Al Capone, Bonnie and Clyde and hundreds of other real and redefine infictional characters who contribute to that portrait of the American hero or some smalloutlaw heading off into the sunset. Today’s stars shine no less brightly and each help redefine in some small way what itway what it means to be American. From the inspiring social activism of means to besinger-songwriter Willie Nelson and feminist Gloria Steinem to revolution- American’ary chef Alice Waters; Al Gore’s laudatory dedication to fighting climatechange and the powerful lyricism of Nobel Prize–winner Toni Morrison; orthe record-breaking run by Olympic-swimmer Michael Phelps: each havefollowed a dream that led them to undoubtedly surprising places. America is still a place where big dreamers can triumph over adversity.Although 40 years have passed since Martin Luther King was assassinated, hismessage of hope lives on. No one in recent history has demonstrated that moreclearly than Barack Obama, America’s first African American president. ‘If there is anyone out there who still doubts that America is a place whereall things are possible; who still wonders if the dream of our founders is alivein our time; who still questions the power of our democracy, tonight is youranswer.’ So began Barack Obama’s election-night victory speech in November2008, following one of the most surprising presidential victories in history. The next day, newspapers across the country sold out quickly, despiteenormously increased press runs, as Americans hurried out to snatch up apiece of history, for which they themselves were responsible. Indeed, it wasa historic moment for America. This once bitterly divided nation – with adark legacy of slavery – looked past its differences and elected an AfricanAmerican man to the highest office in the land. And voters did so by anoverwhelming margin. As Obama went on to say in his victory speech, ‘It’s been a long timecoming, but tonight, because of what we did on this day, in this election, atthis defining moment, change has come to America.’ Change – that magicword so bandied about by both parties in the run-up to the election –played a pivotal role in Obama’s success. Yet, despite the unprecedentedmoment in US history, change is no stranger to the American scene. EvenAmerica’s creation was a daring paradigm shift in a world of monarchiesand autocracies. A country founded as a refuge for religious toleranceby early colonists later became the world’s first – and perhaps its mostbrilliantly envisaged – democratic republic. Over the centuries, visionarystatesman such as Jefferson, Lincoln and Roosevelt have helped move the
  11. 11. 24 D E S T I N AT I O N U S A lonelyplanet.com country in bold new directions, but it was courageous citizens, fighting (and sometimes sacrificing their lives) in the battle against injustice, who’ve brought about some of America’s most profound changes – in abolishing slavery, earning equal rights for women, protecting the environment and enshrining fair wages and working conditions for laborers. Citizens from all walks of life have participated in ‘the great American experiment’, a concept that rewards bold ideas and hard work, no matter one’s place in society. The results of nurturing this entrepreneurial spirit have been far-reaching. From the historic flight by the Wright Brothers to the Apollo moon landing, Americans have achieved ambitious goals. Technological revolutions beginning with Thomas Edison’s light bulb and Henry Ford’s automobile continue today in the pioneering work by Bill Gates, Steve Jobs and Larry Page. Microsoft, Apple and Google have changed the way people work, learn and interact across the industrialized‘Citizens world. American advances in science, medicine and countless other fields have brought meaningful changes to many lives.from all The spirit of innovation remains alive and well, but on other fronts,walks of Americans seem less optimistic. As this book went to press, the US waslife have just starting to show signs of recovery from a deep recession stemming in part from the mortgage meltdown that erupted late in the Bush presidency.participated In 2008, over three million Americans lost their homes to foreclosure asin ‘the great unemployment soared – with some 15 million out of work in late 2009American (the highest figure since WWII). Health care is another dispiriting topic for many Americans. Despiteexperiment’ playing a leading role in medical technology, the USA remains the world’s only wealthy industrialized country that does not provide universal health care for its citizens. More than 46 million Americans currently live without health insurance, and analysts predict that the economic downturn and rising unemployment will add another two million to their ranks. Addressing these grievous issues – plus the ongoing conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan – remain the biggest challenges of the day. Americans, however, aren’t a nation easily put down. As John F Kennedy once said in an inaugural address, ‘The American, by nature, is optimistic. He is experimental, an inventor and a builder who builds best when called upon to build greatly.’
  12. 12. 25Getting StartedGot your map? Ready to plot out your road trip? Just remember: the USAcovers a continent and more. Texas alone is twice the size of Germany, soyou may need to adjust your sense of scale. It’s easy to get overambitious,blow your budget and spend more time getting to sights than actually seeingthem. Our best advice? Plan what you want to see in the time that you thinkyou will have, then take out half the stops. Reservations are essential during peak travel seasons, especially during thesummer months and around major holidays (p1141). But don’t let a lack ofadvance planning stop you from traveling any time, because spontaneity andthe adventure of the open road are what America is really all about. You’ll need to consider your transportation options carefully, balancingcost, time and flexibility – as well as your carbon footprint. The ‘best’ wayto get around can vary by region and route. For more ecotravel advice,see p26.WHEN TO GOAmerica’s size plays to the traveler’s advantage when it comes to weather:it’s always perfect somewhere in the USA and just shy of hell somewhereelse. In other words, either your destination or your trip’s timing may needtweaking depending on the season. For specific regional info, see eachchapter’s Land & Climate section. For current weather forecasts, checkthe Weather Channel (www.weather.com). The busiest travel season is summer, which typically begins on Memorial See Climate ChartsDay (the last Monday in May) and ends on Labor Day (the first Monday (p1137) for morein September). Americans take their vacations mainly in summer because information.schools are closed, not because the weather’s uniformly ideal. But yes, youshould hit the beaches in August, when Manhattan is a shimmering sweatbath and the deserts are frying pans. The seasons don’t arrive uniformly either. Spring (typically March toMay) and fall (usually September to November) are often the best traveltimes, but ‘spring’ in parts of the Rockies and Sierras may not come tillJune. By then it’s only a sweet memory in Austin, while in Seattle, springoften means rain, rain, rain. And winter? It’s expensive during thehigh season at ski resorts and inparts of the southern US (RV-driving retirees, aka ‘snowbirds,’ head downto Florida, Texas and other sunny climes by Thanksgiving on the fourthThursday of November). But planned well, winter can mean you have theriches of some American landscapes virtually all to yourself. Whether you’re planning to join the crowds or avoid them, holidays(p1141) and festivals (p1140) are factors to think about.COSTS & MONEYAn economical US trip is possible, but it is easy to spend much more thanyou bargained for, no matter what your travel style. Mode of transporta-tion is a big factor, as is destination: cities don’t chip away at budgets, theyjackhammer them into pieces. Only the creatively thrifty backpacker or road-tripper will spend lessthan $100 a day. A comfortable midrange budget ranges from $150 to$250 a day; this usually gets you a car, gas, two meals, a decent hotel anda museum admission or two. Spending over $300 a day isn’t hard: just
  13. 13. 26 G E T T I N G S TA R T E D • • T r a v e l i n g R e s p o n s i b l y lonelyplanet.com DON’T LEAVE HOME WITHOUT…  Checking current US visa (p1148) and passport (p1152) requirements  Adequate travel and medical insurance (p1141)  Up-to-date medical vaccinations (p1168)  Hotel reservations, particularly for your first night and near national parks (p1131)  Your driver’s license (p1163). Not driving? Take it anyway – you might change your mind once you see exactly how big the USA is  Nerves of steel for driving on urban freeways (p1165)  A handful of credit cards – they’re often easier and safer than cash, and are sometimes required (eg for hotel reservations, car rentals, show tickets)  An open mind: you’ll find foodies in the Ozarks and hicks in Manhattan, and everything in between in the USA splash out a few times, drive a lot, and stay, eat and whoop it up in the likes of New York, Chicago, San Francisco. In this guide, we define a ‘midrange’ hotel, broadly, as costing from $80 to $200 per night per double occupancy. In rural areas, $100 buys a princely night’s sleep, but in some cities, clean budget places start at $200. The same holds true for meals. To travel on the cheap, plan on camping (sometimes free but up to $35 per night) or hostelling ($20 to $35 a night), cooking some of your own meals, and touring by bus and train, both of which limit your flexibility and are slower than driving or flying (that’s not necessarily a bad thing). Be wary of budget motel come-ons; the sign might flash $39, but that’s probably for aHOW MUCH? single room and doesn’t include taxes. For money-saving advice on accom-Broadway show $100-300 modations, see p1131. Traveling by car is often a necessity. A rental is a bare minimum of $30Major-league baseball a day (type of car, taxes, fees and insurance can push it higher), plus gas.game $27 Planning the great American road trip? Gas could actually cost more thanInternet access per hour the car itself (say, another $20 to $40 per day, depending on how far you’re$3-12 driving and on what kind of roads).Gallon of milk $3.35 Families can save money by booking accommodations that don’t chargeLocal payphone call extra for children staying in the same room, by asking for kids’ menus at35-50¢ restaurants and by taking advantage of family discounts at museums, theme parks and other sights. For more on traveling with children, see p1136. For discounts that everyone can use, see p1139. Don’t forget that old travel chestnut: after you halve the clothes you’ve packed in your suitcase, double your estimated budget, and it’ll all work out fine. TRAVELING RESPONSIBLY Since 1973, Lonely Planet has inspired readers to tread lightly, travel respon- sibly and enjoy the serendipitous magic of independent travel. Globally, travel is growing at a jaw-dropping rate, and we still firmly believe in the benefits it can bring. As always, we encourage you to consider the impact your visit will have on local economies, indigenous cultures and the environment, especially native ecosystems and wildlife. In the USA, ‘going green’ has become trendy, and businesses of all stripes now slap ‘eco’ stickers on their products and services. For the traveler, determining how ecofriendly they actually are can be difficult. Throughout this guide, our authors have carefully researched and recommended ecofriendly, sustainable tourism practices (see also the GreenDex, p1212) that support environmental
  14. 14. lonelyplanet.com G E T T I N G S TA R T E D • • T r a v e l i n g R e s p o n s i b l y 27and conservation efforts; help preserve local, regional and ethnic identity; and/orsupport indigenous arts and culture, particularly that of Native Americans. Many other resources are springing up to certify ecofriendly businesses,hotels, services, tours and outfitters, including state and local tourism bu-reaus. Be sure to review the listings’ criteria for reliability and independencecarefully. Here are a few:Alaska Wilderness Recreation & Tourism Association (www.awrta.org) Resources forNative Alaska culture and arts, special events and discounts on outdoor activities.Alternative Hawaii (www.alternative-hawaii.com) Ecotourism website promoting Hawaiianculture and independent ecotravel.Chicago Sustainable Business Alliance (http://csba.foresightdesign.org) For ecotourismnews, events and a ‘green’ business directory.Green Hotel Association (www.greenhotels.com) Self-selecting pay-to-play membership, but auseful online directory nonetheless.Greenopia (www.greenopia.com/USA) City guides for ecoliving in San Francisco, Los Angeles,New York City and more.Handmade in America (www.handmadeinamerica.org) Art roads and farm trails in North Carolina. ‘SustainableHawaii Ecotourism Association (www.hawaiiecotourism.org) Travel tips, cultural events and tourism is‘green’ business listings.Historic Hotels of America (www.historichotels.org) Online directory and accommodations about morebooking from the National Trust for Historic Preservation. than makingoffManhattan (www.offmanhattan.com) Green travel around New York City, always accessible ‘green’by public transportation.Travel Green Wisconsin (www.travelgreenwisconsin.com) Comprehensive, engaging website for choices; it’strip planning, from agritourism, outdoor adventures and festivals to hotels, restaurants and shops. a way ofVital Communities (www.vitalcommunities.org) Green restaurants and local farmers markets in interactingNew England’s Vermont and New Hampshire. with peopleChoosing public transportation instead of renting a car will decrease your and thecarbon footprint. But realistically, a car is often a necessity in the USA – so, environmentconsider renting ecofriendly cars when available from national agencies suchas Avis, Budget or Hertz (see p1164). Also look for independent rental agen- as you travel’cies specializing in hybrid and electric rental cars (p1164). Zipcar (p1164)is a car-sharing service now available in cities and towns in 25 states. Theautomobile association Better World Club (p1161) supports environmentallegislation and offers ecofriendly services for members, including roadsideassistance for both cars and bicycles. While hitchhiking (p1165) is always risky, ride-sharing using online bul-letin boards like Craigslist (CL; www.craigslist.org) is not uncommon. CL also haslistings for vacation rentals and housing sublets, short-term jobs and com-munity activities, and free classified ads for anything you might want to buy,sell or barter during your trip, whether a surfboard, bicycle or used car. Of course, sustainable tourism is about more than making ‘green’choices; it’s a way of interacting with people and the environment asyou travel. It’s practicing low-impact hiking and camping (see p126). It’svolunteering during your vacation (see p1150). It’s also learning aboutindigenous cultures and understanding the challenges they face today. Formore on US environmental issues, see p128 and check out the following:Climatecrisis.net (www.climatecrisis.net) Official website for the documentary An InconvenientTruth; offers carbon-offset programs, advice and information.National Geographic Center for Sustainable Destinations (www.nationalgeographic.com/travel/sustainable) Promotes ‘geotourism’ with webcams, digital images, maps, blogs andonline traveler resources.Sierra Club (www.sierraclub.org) Environmental and conservation news, political activism, grouphikes and volunteer vacations.
  15. 15. 28 G E T T I N G S TA R T E D • • T o p Te n lonelyplanet.com Sustainable Travel International (www.sustainabletravelinternational.org) Provides TOP 10 ecotravel guides, tour booking, a carbon-offset program and more. The Nature Conservancy (www.nature.org) Protects millions of acres of wildlands in all 50 states; plus an e-newsletter, magazine and volunteer programs. SCENIC DRIVES A road trip can’t exist without roads. Here are 10 doozies. Frankly, we had to arm wrestle over our favorites, so consider this list very incomplete. Turn to the USA Road Trips (p44) and Itineraries (p33) chapters for more. For America’s ‘official’ scenic drives, visit www.byways.org. 1 Pacific Coast Hwy (Hwy 1), California: officially, 6 Hana Hwy (Hwy 360), Maui, Hawaii: just 42 miles through Orange County (p938); 38 miles from Pauwela to Hana (p1126) for the full Mexico–Canada trip, see p45 7 Natchez Trace Parkway: 444 miles from 2 Route 66: 2400 miles from Chicago, Illinois, Nashville, Tennessee, to Natchez, to Los Angeles, California (p44) Mississippi (p432) 3 Blue Ridge Parkway: 469 miles from Shen- 8 Hwy 12, Utah: 110 miles from Torrey to andoah National Park (VA; p375), to Great Bryce Canyon National Park (p881) Smoky Mountains National Park (NC; (p46) 9 Columbia River Hwy (Hwy 30), Oregon: 4 Great River Road: 2000 miles from Lake Itasca, 74 miles from Troutdale to the Dalles Minnesota, to New Orleans, Louisiana (p48) (p1061) 5 Overseas Hwy (Hwy 1), Florida: 160 miles 10 Turquoise Trail (Hwy 14), New Mexico: from Miami to Key West (p523) 45 miles from Tijeras to Santa Fe (p894) PARTIES & PARADES Americans will use any excuse to party. Seriously. Here are 10 festivals worth planning a trip around. For more, browse the destination chapters, see p1140 and p98, and visit www.festivals.com. 1 Mardi Gras, New Orleans, Louisiana, 6 Gullah Festival, Beaufort, South Carolina, February/early March (p481) late May (p413) 2 Mummers Parade, Philadelphia, 7 Red Earth Native American Cultural Festival, Pennsylvania, New Year’s Day (p221) Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, early June (p697) 3 National Cherry Blossom Festival, 8 SF Gay Pride Month, San Francisco, Washington, DC, late March/April (p331) California, June (p980) 4 Conch Republic Independence Celebration, 9 St Paul Winter Carnival, St Paul, Minnesota, Key West, Florida, April (p530) late January (p644) 5 Fiesta San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas, 10 Burning Man Festival, Black Rock Desert, mid-April (p723) Nevada, late August/early September (p835) BIZARRE LODGINGS From haunted mansions to wacky themed rooms, and futuristic ecobubbles to retro concrete tipis, Americans seem to like a little variety when they hit the pillow. To break up the motel monotony, try these 10 places. For more accommodations tips, see p1131. 1 Madonna Inn, San Luis Obispo, California 5 Stanley Hotel, Estes Park, Colorado (p776) (p959) 6 Pelican Hotel, Miami Beach, Florida (p514) 2 Earthship Rentals, Taos, New Mexico (p900) 7 Arcosanti, Phoenix, Arizona (p845) 3 Queen Mary Hotel, Long Beach, California 8 Myrtles Planatation, St Francisville, (p928) Louisiana (p489) 4 Wigwam Village Inn, Cave City, Kentucky 9 Belfry Inne, Sandwich, Massachusetts (p262) (p441) 10 Covington Inn, St Paul, Minnesota (p644)
  16. 16. lonelyplanet.com G E T T I N G S TA R T E D • • T o p Te n 29 TOP 10 OUTDOOR ADVENTURES You can satisfy your jonesing for an adrenaline rush from coast to coast, whether on foot, bicycle or boat, while high in the sky or under the sea. For more about the USA’s great outdoors, turn to p131. For national park adventures, see p106. 1 Trekking the epic Appalachian Trail through 6 Canoeing the Boundary Waters, Minnesota 14 states (p134) (p648) 2 Kayaking the icy waters of Glacier Bay 7 Watching lava flow around Hawaiʻi Volca- National Park & Preserve, Alaska (p1083) noes National Park, Hawaii (p1122) 3 Climbing Mt Rainier, Washington 8 White-water rafting the Middle Fork of the (p1043) Salmon River, Idaho (p815) 4 Scuba diving and snorkeling at Dry 9 Cycling through Northern California’s wine Tortugas National Park, Florida(p531) country (p995) 5 Hiking the Narrows of the Virgin River in 10 Surfing the waves off Southern California’s Zion National Park, Utah (p884) Huntington Beach (p939) SMALL TOWNS Forget NYC, DC, LA and just about anywhere else with an initialism, because it’s small towns that will give you the real scoop on American life. So, go on. Get to know the locals and find out why they are proud to call these blink-and-you’ll-miss-them blips on the map home. 1 Key West, Florida (p527) 6 Hilo, Hawaiʻi the Big Island (p1121) 2 Montpelier, Vermont (p290) 7 Bisbee, Arizona (p865) 3 Luckenbach, Texas (p719) 8 Bozeman, Montana (p801) 4 Seward, Alaska (p1093) 9 Ocean Springs, Mississippi (p470) 5 Telluride, Colorado (p788) 10 Grand Marais, Minnesota (p648) MICROBREWERIES Here’s proof that the liquid lunch exists in America, especially out West. You’ll also find good suds up and down the East Coast, deep into the South, across the Midwest and the Great Plains, and even in far-flung Alaska. Once you’ve gulped down these 10, peruse www.beerinfo.com for more microbreweries and brewpubs in all 50 states. 1 Ska Brewing Company, Durango, Colorado 6 Lakefront Brewery, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (p785) (p628) 2 Abita Brewery, Abita Springs, Louisiana 7 Hopworks Urban Brewery, Portland, (p486) Oregon (p1056) 3 Lost Coast Brewery, Eureka, California 8 Haines Brewing Company, Haines, Alaska (p998) (p1085) 4 Magic Hat Brewery, Burlington, Vermont 9 Free State Brewing, Lawrence, Kansas (p293) (p692) 5 Mountain Sun Pub & Brewery, Boulder, 10 Spoetzl Brewery, Texas (p714) Colorado (p773)
  17. 17. 30 G E T T I N G S TA R T E D • • T o p Te n lonelyplanet.com TOP 10 FOODIE PILGRIMAGES McDonald who?! In contemporary, food-obsessed America, Iron Chefs do battle on TV’s Food Network and gastronomic wunderkinds attain the celebrity status of Hollywood stars. It’s worth detouring to these 10 culinary temples. For tastebud-tempting regional specialties, see p93. For cooking schools, see p102. 1 French Laundry, Yountville, California (p992) 6 Alan Wong’s, Honolulu, Hawaii (p1115) 2 Chez Panisse, Berkeley, California (p990) 7 FIG, Charleston, South Carolina (p410) 3 Mat and Naddie’s, New Orleans, Louisiana 8 Arthur Bryant’s, Kansas City, Missouri (p485) (p668) 4 Alinea, Chicago, Illinois (p581) 9 Azul, Miami, Florida (p515) 5 Daniel, New York City, New York (p184) 10 Hugo’s, Portland, Maine (p307) SPOTS FOR SOLITUDE When the USA’s more than 306 million residents and 50 million other tourists cause claustro- phobia and just make you want to scream, escape to these places. For the USA’s most uncrowded national parks, see p115. 1 Death Valley National Park, California (p954) 6 Hwy 2 through the Sandhills, Nebraska 2 Kaʻena Point, Oʻahu, Hawaii (p1118) (p689) 3 North Cascades National Park, Washington 7 South Manitou Island, Michigan (p621) (p1041) 8 Guadalupe Mountains National Park, Texas 4 Race Point Beach, Provincetown, (p753) Massachusetts (p265) 9 Little Palm Island, Florida Keys (p527) 5 Absaroka Beartooth Wilderness, Montana 10 Portsmouth Island, North Carolina (p803) (p394) LANDMARK BUILDINGS From skyscraping towers and sprawling private estates to postmodern urban icons, the building blocks of this nation are diverse. Many of these 10 are instantly recognizable worldwide, too, thanks to Hollywood. For more about the USA’s groundbreaking architecture, see p90. 1 Empire State Building, New York City, New 6 Walt Disney Concert Hall, Los Angeles, Cali- York (p161) fornia (p920) 2 White House, Washington, DC 7 Biltmore Estate, Asheville, North Carolina (p328) (p401) 3 Willis Tower, Chicago, Illinois (p566) 8 Space Needle, Seattle, Washington 4 Monticello, Virginia (p373) (p1026) 5 Fallingwater, Pennsylvania (p236) – 9 ʻIolani Palace, Honolulu, Hawaii (p1111) or anything else by Frank Lloyd Wright 10 Las Vegas Strip, Las Vegas, Nevada (see the boxed text, p92) (p823)
  18. 18. lonelyplanet.com G E T T I N G S TA R T E D • • T o p Te n 31 TOP 10 MOVIE & TV LOCATIONS Even if it’s your first time traveling in the USA, you might feel some déjà vu when you see these 10 locations, made famous by Hollywood on the silver screen. For more recommended made-in- America films, see p84. For TV, see p83. 1 Los Angeles, California (p914) – just about 6 Mt Rushmore, South Dakota (p683) – as seen everywhere in the city! in Alfred Hitchcock’s North by Northwest 2 Oʻahu’s North Shore, Hawaii (p1118) – 7 Missoula, Montana (p805) – as seen in as seen on TV’s Lost and Baywatch A River Runs Through It 3 National Mall, Washington, DC (p321) – as 8 Dead Horse Point State Park, Utah (p879) – seen in thrillers, spy movies and disaster flicks as seen in the Mission Impossible II 4 Monument Valley Navajo Tribal Park, Navajo opening and Thelma & Louise finale Nation (p858) – as seen in classic Westerns 9 Union Station, Chicago, Illinois (p586) – such as Stagecoach and The Searchers as seen in The Untouchables 5 Alabama Hills, California (p1013) – as seen in 10 Timberline Lodge, Mt Hood, Oregon (p1062) – even more Westerns such as High Sierra as seen in Stanley Kubrick’s The Shining BEACHES So, you already know that California, Hawaii and Florida have drop-dead gorgeous beaches? Fine. But what about Texas, Alaska and Chicago? See, we knew we could still surprise you. Here are 10 gems you might not know about, and there are hundreds more waiting to be discovered: just go find ’em. 1 DT Fleming Beach Park, Maui, Hawaii (p1123) 6 Point Lobos State Reserve, Carmel-by-the- 2 Coast Guard Beach, Cape Cod, Massachusetts Sea, California (p962) (p264) 7 Cumberland Island National Seashore, 3 Padre Island National Seashore, Corpus St Marys, Georgia (p458) Christi, Texas (p733) 8 Fire Island National Seashore, Long Island, 4 Siesta Key Beach, Sarasota, Florida (p543) New York (p193) 5 Assateague Island National Seashore, Berlin, 9 North Avenue Beach, Chicago, Illinois (p569) Maryland (p353) 10 Golden Sands Beach, Nome, Alaska (p1103) HISTORICAL SITES Tangled, embattled, bittersweet and triumphant – that’s the USA’s history in a nutshell (see p51). At these 10 sites you can walk in the footsteps of giants, including Native Americans, Western explorers and modern civil-rights activists. For more destination-worthy historic sites and itineraries, see p120. 1 Historic Triangle, Virginia (p367) 6 Mission San Juan Capistrano, Orange County, 2 Freedom Trail, Boston, Massachussetts (p252) California (p939) 3 Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park, 7 The Alamo, San Antonio, Texas (p720) Skagway, Alaska (p1085) 8 Brown vs Board of Education National 4 Gettysburg National Military Park, Gettysburg, Historic Site, Kansas (p693) Pennsylvania (p229) 9 Mesa Verde National Park, Colorado (p789) 5 Lewis & Clark National Historical Park, 10 Puʻuhonua O Honaunau National Historical Oregon (p1068) Park, Hawaii (p1119)
  19. 19. 32 G E T T I N G S TA R T E D • • T r a v e l L i t e r a t u re lonelyplanet.com TRAVEL LITERATURE The American travelogue is its own literary genre. One could argue that the first (and still the best) is Democracy in America (1835), by Alexis de Tocqueville, who wandered around talking to folks, then in pithy fashion distilled the philosophical underpinnings of the then-new American experiment. America is often most vividly described by non-Americans: two Russian satirists road-tripped during the Great Depression searching for the ‘real America’ (doesn’t everyone?), and their Ilf and Petrov’s American Road‘Perhaps the Trip (1935) is a comic masterpiece laced with pungent critiques. Those who prefer their commentary and humor, like their coffee, bittermost famous and black should stuff The Air-Conditioned Nightmare (1945) by HenryAmerican Miller in their backpack, written while the irascible and notoriously ob-travelogue scene writer canvassed America during WWII. Celebrated travel writer and historian Jan Morris was clearly smittenis Jack with the country in Coast to Coast (1956), originally titled As I Saw theKerouac’s USA; it’s crisp, elegant and poignant, particularly her experience in theheadlong pre-Civil Rights–era South. Perhaps the most famous American travelogue is Jack Kerouac’s head-On the Road’ long On the Road (1957), a Beat Generation classic that’s full of hot jazz, poetry and drugs in post-WWII America. John Steinbeck’s Travels with Charley (1962), about the novelist’s trek across America with his poodle for company, takes a critical look at how technology, tradition and prejudice have shaped the regional character of this country. Written during a crossroads in midlife, William Least Heat-Moon’s Blue Highways (1982) is a moving pastiche of ‘average Americans’ as it follows one man’s attempt to find himself by losing himself on the road. Not strictly a travelogue, On the Rez (2000), by Ian Frazier, provides a good taste of contemporary life on Native American reservations. It’s a journey of history and heart that goes into America, rather than across it. See p79 for more on American literature. INTERNET RESOURCES Away.com (www.away.com) Boundless ideas for outdoor and urban adventure travel across the 50 states, from Hawaii’s beaches to Boston’s Freedom Trail. Festivals.com (www.festivals.com) From coast to coast, find where the best parties are – live-music shows, food fiestas and even more unlikely celebrations, such as of pirates and covered bridges. Lonely Planet (www.lonelyplanet.com) Travel news and summaries, savvy hotel and hostel reviews, the Thorn Tree community forum, and links to more web resources. New York Times Travel (http://travel.nytimes.com) Travel news, practical advice and features including 36-hour city breaks and authentic ‘American Journeys.’ Roadside America (www.roadsideamerica.com) For all things weird and wacky: who needs the Statue of Liberty when you’ve got ‘Muffler Men’ and ‘Mega-Messiahs’?! USA.gov (www.usa.gov/Citizen/Topics/Travel.shtml) The closest thing to a national tourism information resource, on the US federal government’s official website.
  20. 20. 33ItinerariesCLASSIC ROUTES Why are EastCITIES BY THE SEA Two to Three Weeks / Boston to Maryland Coasters so stressedThe nice thing about East Coast metropolises? They’re near the beach! out? BecauseHere you can balance culture, history and cuisine with coastal idylls and eastern seaboardlong naps in the sun. Arrive in revolutionary Boston (p243), then go to sandy Cape Cod (p260), highways couldn’tand keep going till you reach Provincetown (p265), where the Pilgrims be more congested.landed. Pretty, ain’t it? Then scoot down I-195 to Rhode Island’s quaint So why on earthNewport (p276); time your visit for a music festival. do this road trip? Now, tackle New York City (p145). Once you’ve had your fill of the bus-tling Big Apple, escape to the Hamptons (p194) on Long Island; what was Slow down, avoidthe hurry, again? rush hour, hit the In New Jersey, go ‘down the shore’ to Long Beach Island (p210), and if you’re beaches often, anda casino gambler, Atlantic City (p210) and its boardwalk. for 1100 detour- Then, make time for Philadelphia (p213), Baltimore (p339), and Washington, laden miles, it’s oneDC (p318). Finally, cross Chesapeake Bay and relax on Maryland’s Eastern Shore first-class metropolis(p350). after another. New CANADA Hampshire Vermont Provincetown BOSTON Massachusetts 3 3 New York 195 Cape Cod Rhode Island Newport Connecticut 95 The Hamptons 495 New York City New Jersey Pennsylvania Long Beach Island Philadelphia Atlantic City 95 Chesapeake Baltimore Bay Delaware ATLANTIC 95 50 OCEAN WASHINGTON 20 Eastern Shore West Virginia Maryland Virginia
  21. 21. 34 ITINERARIES •• Classic Routes lonelyplanet.com THE LEFT COAST Two to Three Weeks / Portland to San Diego Geographically and politically, the West Coast couldn’t be further from Washington, DC. This is a trip for those who lean left, and who like their nature ancient and wild, and their horizons and beaches wide-open. Affable Portland (p1046) is a pretty place to start. Then jump into nature’s bounty by driving east along the Columbia River Gorge (p1061). At The Dalles, turn south and make for Mt Hood (p1061) for winter skiing and summer hik- ing. From Bend (p1063), enjoy Cascades adventures around Sisters (p1062) and Crater Lake (p1064). Catch a Shakespearian play in sunny Ashland (p1064), then trade the mountains for the foggy coast. Enter California via Hwy 199 and magnificent Redwood National & State Parks (p998). Hug the coast as it meanders south through funky Arcata and seaside Eureka (p997), get lost on the Lost Coast (p997), then catch Hwy 1 through quaint Mendocino (p996). Make your way inland to the Napa & Sonoma Valleys (p991) for a wash-up and wine tasting, and thence to the romantically hilly, bohemian burg of San Francisco (p966). Return to scenic Hwy 1 (p966) through weird Santa Cruz (p964), bayfront Monterey (p962) and beatnik-flavored Big Sur (p960), where you can get scruffy again. In no time you’ll reach Hearst Castle (p960) and laid-back, collegiate San Luis Obispo (p959). Roll into Mediterranean-esque Santa Barbara (p956), then hop aboard a ferry in Ventura to the wildlife-rich Channel Islands (p956) At last, Los Angeles (p914) – aka LA, La-la Land, City of Angels. Go ahead, indulge your fantasies of Hollywood (p921) and gawk at the beautiful people of the OC (p938) before kicking back in San Diego (p939). Let’s see. In 1550 miles, is there CANADA eco-friendly out- Washington door adventure? Columbia Check. Microbrews Portland River Gorge 84 Montana and fine wines? Mt Hood (1,239ft) 197 Sisters Check. Heart-stop- Bend ping forests and Crater Oregon Lake 97 Redwood National 199 5 62 mountains? Check. & State Parks Ashland Idaho Arcata Legendary coastal Lost Eureka Coast Wyoming drives? Check. 101 PACIFIC Freaks, visionaries Mendocino OCEAN 1 Napa &and radicals? Check. Sonoma 29 Valleys Surf beaches, San Francisco Nevada gourmet cuisine, Utah Santa Cruz Monterey cutting-edge art, Big Sur Colorado California multicultural 1 Hearst Castle cities? You bet! San Luis Obispo Welcome to the Santa Barbara 101 Channel Los Angeles West Coast. Islands 1 New Orange County Arizona Mexico 101 San Diego MEXICO

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