Disability and Sexuality Forum 2010 - Josie Prioletti

1,462 views
1,394 views

Published on

Presentation by Josie Prioletti (facilitator) from field - Disability and Sexuality Forum held on Thursday 18 March at Darebin Arts and Entertainment Centre, Preston.

Published in: Education
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,462
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
20
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
6
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Disability and Sexuality Forum 2010 - Josie Prioletti

  1. 1. Disability and Sexuality Forum March 2010
  2. 2. 1. Reasons for the forum <ul><li>“ Asexuality” is the rarest medical condition in the world, yet, we rarely discuss sexuality in relation to people with disabilities. </li></ul><ul><li>There is a vast range of legislation/standards and Community Services Training (Cert 3 & 4 Disability Studies): </li></ul><ul><li>Disability Discrimination Act </li></ul><ul><li>Equal Opportunity Act </li></ul><ul><li>Disability Service Standards etc. </li></ul>
  3. 3. <ul><li>These state that people with disabilities: </li></ul><ul><li>Have the same rights as all citizens </li></ul><ul><li>Should be empowered to make choices </li></ul><ul><li>Live in the “least restrictive way” and “experience dignity of risk” </li></ul><ul><li>Personal values have an impact on how we provide services – how does this impact on the services we provide for people with disabilities? </li></ul>
  4. 4. 2. Aims of the forum <ul><li>To raise awareness of the barriers and needs of people with disabilities meeting their sexual needs. </li></ul><ul><li>To create an environment to openly discuss sexuality, dignity of risk and values/conflict of values that may arise in your workplace. </li></ul><ul><li>To review/consider the support provided to clients in the area of sexuality </li></ul><ul><li>To demystify the sex industry and sex workers </li></ul>
  5. 5. <ul><li>To discuss some options and resources available for people with disabilities. </li></ul><ul><li>To assist you to consider responses to issues to affirm the rights of people with disabilities. </li></ul><ul><li>An opportunity to ask questions and share ideas. </li></ul>
  6. 6. DHS Sexuality policy 2009 <ul><li>Key points raised in the policy: </li></ul><ul><li>People with a disability have the right to explore, express and act according to their own values and attitudes. Like other citizens, people with a disability have a wide range of values and attitudes towards personal relationships, and these values and attitudes may change over time. </li></ul>
  7. 7. <ul><li>Staff must respect the values and attitudes of people with a disability, and any decisions or actions based on those regardless if staff disagree with or share the same values. </li></ul><ul><li>People with a disability have a right to engage in relationships of their choice. </li></ul><ul><li>Staff must ensure all information about the personal relationships of a person with a disability are kept private unless the person consents to disclosure, or duty of care or legal issues require disclosure. </li></ul>
  8. 8. <ul><li>For people with a disability living in a DHS facility:( 2008) </li></ul><ul><li>NOW CHANGED </li></ul>Staff must ensure they do not provide direct support for a person to access a sex worker, nor allow DHS premises to be used for the purposes of providing the services of a sex worker. Taken from website: www.dhs.vic.gov.au
  9. 9. 3. Scenarios for discussion <ul><li>For each of the following scenarios, discuss with your group </li></ul><ul><li>Service barriers/limits/expectations </li></ul><ul><li>Your feelings/thoughts/preferred options </li></ul>
  10. 10. <ul><li>A Client (adult )wants to learn how to masturbate </li></ul><ul><li>A married couple who both have physical disabilities need some physical support(needs assistance with positioning) in order to have sex </li></ul><ul><li>A person with a mild intellectual disability is keen to have a child with her partner (as a sole parent) but will require support as they have no immediate family and limited friends? </li></ul><ul><li>A client (physical disability) is keen to meet a partner and has been unsuccessful after numerous attempts with on line dating.He now appears to be rather depressed. </li></ul>
  11. 11. <ul><li>A client asks for your assistance to </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Purchase a vibrator </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Switch on a vibrator </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Use a vibrator </li></ul></ul><ul><li>2. You are Tim’s support worker. Tim is 25 years old and lives with cerebral palsy. Tim has asked you to support him to visit a prostitute. </li></ul><ul><li>3. You work for a couple who both have severe physical disabilities. They ask for your assistance to have sex. </li></ul>
  12. 12. 4. DHS Sexuality policy 2009 <ul><li>Key points raised in the policy: </li></ul><ul><li>People with a disability have the right to explore, express and act according to their own values and attitudes. Like other citizens, people with a disability have a wide range of values and attitudes towards personal relationships, and these values and attitudes may change over time. </li></ul>
  13. 13. <ul><li>Staff must respect the values and attitudes of people with a disability, and any decisions or actions based on those regardless if staff disagree with or share the same values. </li></ul><ul><li>People with a disability have a right to engage in relationships of their choice. </li></ul><ul><li>Staff must ensure all information about the personal relationships of a person with a disability are kept private unless the person consents to disclosure, or duty of care or legal issues require disclosure. </li></ul>
  14. 14. <ul><li>For people with a disability living in a DHS facility:( 2008) </li></ul><ul><li>NOW CHANGED </li></ul>Staff must ensure they do not provide direct support for a person to access a sex worker, nor allow DHS premises to be used for the purposes of providing the services of a sex worker. Taken from website: www.dhs.vic.gov.au

×