Welcome to the
Presentation on
Pre-operational & Environmental Mitigation
Planning for Muti-purpose Hydel Projects
By
Ravi...
fxj;Lrs ioZr% fgeoUrks vj.;e~ rs i`fFkoh
L;ksueLrq
vFkZoosn
O Mother Earth! May your Mountains be show-clad
and your fores...
Statutory provision for Environment, Forest and
Wildlife Clearances
• Environment Impact Assessment Notification, 2006 [un...
Barrier Analysis to Forest (Conservation) Act, 1980 and
Environment (Protection) Act, 1986;
• Intricately woven “forest cl...
THE CONSTITUTION OF INDIA (SCHEDULE – VI)
SIXTH SCHEDULE
[Articles 244(2) and 275(1)]
Provisions as to the Administration ...
3. Powers of the District Councils and Regional Councils to make laws.—(1)
The Regional Council for an autonomous region i...
Provided that nothing in such laws shall prevent the compulsory acquisition of any land,
whether occupied or unoccupied, f...
39. Licences or leases for the purpose of prospecting for, or extraction of, minerals.—(1)
Such share of the royalties acc...
Sanctions issued by GOI & Central Water Commission
S.
No.
Particulars Target date Date of
submission
Date of
approval
1. S...
S.
No.
Particulars Target date Date of
submission
Date of
approval
(vii) CSMRS Directorate
(ix) Cost Appraisal
Directorate...
THE WISDOM
Though obtaining clearances is taking 12 to 20
years. Criticizing provisions of environment,
forest, wildlife a...
Why C.S.R. necessary?
• Established fact that rural and tribal communities can
draw “sustainable livelihood” from land rel...
• All these activities adversely impact “water regime” and
“soil moisture regime” of the area leading to reduced
agricultu...
• CSR towards “human community” – MPSFDC contributing
2% of PAT and 10% of net timber revenue according to
formula approve...
• The Companies Act, 2013 provides for spending 2% of PAT
for CSR activities – what happens if project management fails
to...
• Linear projects like transmission lines, gas and mineral
slurry pipelines, conveyor belts, railways, roads, canals
are m...
• Section-135, Companies Act, 2013 – Every company having
networth of Rs. 500/- crores or turn-over of Rs. 100/- crores
or...
Pre-operational project planning
• Appoint several social development scientists,
anthropologist, sociologist for “social ...
C.S.R. Activities
BLANKET &
MOSQUITO NET
DISTRIBUTION
LPG DISTRIBUTION
UTENSILS DISTRIBUTION
BICYCLE DISTRIBUTION
Health Camps
• Health camps have been organized in 428 forest villages
and 2013 JFMCs.
• Beneficiaries have been provided ...
Medical Camps
Medical Camps
Joint Forest Management Committee Sports
Activities
• To encourage the participation of younger generation in JFM &
forest...
Forest Cover of India*
Diversion of about 300 sq.kms. forest areas (0.04%) in next 20 years can solve the
energy problems ...
FORESTS AT A GLANCE
• Geographical area – 32,87,263 sq. kms.
• Forest area – 7,57,740 sq. kms.
• Forest cover – 6,78,333 s...
Red indicates that a change in vegetation is projected at that grid in the
time-period of 2021-2050 and 2071-2100 (under A...
Biodiversity Vulnerable Grids of India (marked red) in the A1B
scenario – for India - 2035 and 2085
Climate Change and Bio...
Salient provisions of FCA
• The FCA broadly covers 4 aspects of forest
management
• The following orders can be passed by ...
Continue…
(iii) Assignment of forest land to persons,
individuals, corporate bodies, JVC,
Committees, Societies, etc., (ex...
Applicability of FCA
• The terms “forests” and “forest land” have not
been defined neither in IFA nor in FCA
• These terms...
APPLICABILITY OF FCA
FOREST LANDS
FOREST DEPARTMENT
•RESERVE FOREST
•PROTECTED FOREST
(demarcated,
undemarcated)
•UNCLASSE...
COMPENSATORY AFFORESTATION
• Identification and transfer of non-forest land is most
crucial issue.
• Compensatory afforest...
• The non-availability of non-forest land for CA would
be accepted by the Central Government only on the
Certificate from ...
TWO STAGE CLEARANCE
Flow chart for obtaining “environment clearance”
Post “environment clearance” monitoring mechanism
Aftermath of FCA clearance
 Depositing funds for CA, CAT plan, NPV, Wildlife Habitat
Management Plan, CAT Plan, plantatio...
Project Location
Topo-sheets of Survey of India
For CAT Plan and CAD Plan use maps of scale of
1:2,50,000 or 1:10,00,000
Survey Precautions
• Contours of 2 meters and 4 meters below full
reservoir level (FRL).
• Mostly GOI doesn’t allow fellin...
Diver
sion
Site
DISTRICT FOREST COVER MAP OF SURVEY OF INDIA
Buffer
Zone
Distance
from
protecte
d areas
Animal
Activity
Ar...
Exhibit Location of important components, wildlife
migration routes & Tiger / Elephant Reserve Corridors
Tara Coal Block
l...
Documents required for FC, EC and
wildlife clearances
Flora
 Characterization of forest types in the study area as per th...
Maps and satellite imageries
Forest maps are vital for silviculture crop assessment and
determination of Net Present Value...
Forest Satellite Imagery – only land-use discernible,
legal status cannot be ascertained
“Gap Light Analyser” is available...
Sample Plot Grids & Biodiversity indexing
* N.B. Kind attention invited to blanks, under stocked and encroachments
Alternate Diversion Area in Revised Proposal, if ...
Tree Enumeration & Biodiversity Assessment
• Biodiversity indexing – Shannon-Weiner Index ,
Brillouin Index, Brillouin Eve...
Sample Plot Photographs for crown density and
basal area determination by Wedge Prism
Fauna
 Inventorisation of terrestrial wildlife including reptiles and
herpetofauna, their present status in the project a...
Most threatened wildlife species - I
Most threatened wildlife species - II
Most threatened floral species - I
Net Present Value
• Soil Expectation Value (forest increment) is
compensated for 50 years in forest diversion cases.
• Cal...
NPV rates sanctioned vide Circular dated
5th February, 2009 of MOEF, GOI
Eco-Class - I Type of Forests (Champion & Seth, 1...
Eco-
value
Class and NPV rates (in lakh Rs.)
Class-I Class-II Class-
III
Class-
IV
Class-V Class-
VI
Very
Dense
Forests
10...
• These NPV rates were valid till 5th February, 2012
only. The new rates are under processing – may raise
from 245% to 375...
Transplantation of middle aged trees
Effect of fragmentation of forest & wildlife habitat corridor
Sharp-edge Effect of roads & canals
Sharp-edge effect of roads and canals
Use of geo-textile for surface stabilisation
VEGETATIVE CONTOUR BUNDING
Catchment Area Treatment Plan
Issues related to wildlife and Wildlife (Protection) Act, 1972
National Parks - Conservation Reserve - 2
Wildlife Sanctuar...
Present & Potential “Protected Areas” of India, WII
PROTECTED AREAS &
WILDLIFE (PROTECTION) ACT, 1972
Salient features
• Geographical area (including
forest area) under PA ne...
Typical forest & village mosaic of a protected area
All non-forest areas situated within external boundary of
protected ar...
APPLICABILITY OF WLPA
Protected areas
FOREST DEPARTMENT
• National Parks,
• Wildlife Sanctuaries,
• Conservation Reserve
•...
 The statutory body of National Tiger Conservation
Authority (NTCA) constituted under provisions of
Wildlife (Protection)...
Section-38V(4) : the State Government while preparing a
Tiger Conservation Plan ensure livelihood of local
communities. Th...
Tiger Corridor Plan
• Details of man-wildlife conflict to determine true status of
wildlife. Compensation paid to villager...
Preparation, integration and sanction of
“Wildlife Habitat Conservation Plan”.
Preparation of “Wildlife Habitat Conservati...
Other Issues of “Wildlife Habitat Conservation Plan”
and Wildlife (Protection) Act, 1972
 Submission of “Wildlife Habitat...
 Few experts understand “wildlife impact
assessment”; still fewer possess expertise for
“Wildlife Rehabilitation & Resett...
Issues related to Scheduled Tribe & Other Traditional Forest
Dweller (Recognition of Forest Right) Act, 2006
• STOTFD(RFR) Act, 2006 enacted and became operational on 1st
January, 2007.
• Jurisdiction over all types of forest areas...
• Topsy turvey settlement process – Gram sabha, Block
Committee and ultimate decision at District Committee.
Pressure to a...
A.MOEF has issued two specific circulars dated 30th July,
2009 and 03rd August, 2009 for this purpose. The salient
provisi...
 State Government shall certify that the proposal for such
diversion (with full details of project and its implications i...
• The Section-3(2) provides that, notwithstanding anything contained
in FCA; the Central Government shall provide for dive...
• Ministry of Tribal affairs, GOI vide Circular No. 23011/15/2008-S.G.II dated
18th May, 2009 has issued instructions unde...
Transmission Lines
• Poaching through electrocution is a big issue,
particularly in Buffer Zones of PAs.
• Low height plan...
Aquatic Ecology
Aquatic Ecology
 Aqua- fauna like macro-invertebrates, zoo-plankton,
phyto-planktons, benthos, primary pr...
Monitoring of Project Approval Status - I
Date of commencement : Time period : 12 months
S.
No
Particulars Target Date
Dat...
Monitoring of Project Approval Status -II
S.
No Particulars
Target
Date
Date of
Submission
Date of
approval Remarks
iv) Ir...
EIA & EMP Studies
To carryout EIA / EMP study submit an application to MoEF
to get NABET accreditation for carrying out en...
Activity Schedule for EIA & EMP Studies -I
S.
No.
Requirement as per TOR
issued by MoEF
Weightage
%
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 %
Pr...
Activity Schedule for EIA & EMP Studies -II
S.
No.
Requirement as per
TOR
issued by MoEF
Weightag
e
% 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
%
...
S.
No
.
Requirement as per
TOR
issued by MoEF
Weightag
e
%
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
%
Progres
s
Remarks
9
Environment
Management
...
Activity Schedule for EIA & EMP Studies -IV
S.
No.
Requirement as per TOR
issued by MoEF
Weightage
%
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
%
P...
Monitoring of the status of work performed –
primary data collection -I
Description Total works to be
done
Works
completed...
Status of work performed – primary data collection -II
Description Total works to be
done
Works
completed
Remaining
works
...
Status of work performed – primary data collection -III
Description Total works to be
done
Works
completed
Remaining
works...
Status of work to be performed –
secondary data collection -I
Physico-chemical aspects
 Topography of the area
 Regional...
Status of work to be performed –
secondary data collection - II
Ecological aspects
• Information on general vegetation pat...
Status of work to be performed –
secondary data collection - III
Ecological aspects -
• Inventory of Birds, mammals, repti...
Status of work to be performed –
secondary data collection - IV
Socio-economic aspects
• Demography and socio-economic ana...
Schedule for Completion of Balance Work
Activity Completion Schedule
Submission of Form-A for Forestry Clearance
Submissio...
Remote Sensing & GIS Studies
Remote sensing & GIS studies
 Project layout on contour map of ground elevation.
 Delineati...
Socio-economic Aspect
Socio-Economic aspects
 Demographic profile
 Economic structure
 Development profile
 Agricultur...
Geological & Geophysical Studies
Geological and Geophysical Aspects
 Geography & physiography of the project area.
 Regi...
Study & Design of Earthquake parameters
Study of Designated Earthquake Parameters
• A site specific study of earthquake pa...
Hydrology of the Basin
Hydrology of the basin
 Hydro-meteorology, drainage systems
 Catastrophic events like cloud burst...
Pre-operational & Environmental Mitigation Planning for Multipurpose Hydel Projects
Pre-operational & Environmental Mitigation Planning for Multipurpose Hydel Projects
Pre-operational & Environmental Mitigation Planning for Multipurpose Hydel Projects
Pre-operational & Environmental Mitigation Planning for Multipurpose Hydel Projects
Pre-operational & Environmental Mitigation Planning for Multipurpose Hydel Projects
Pre-operational & Environmental Mitigation Planning for Multipurpose Hydel Projects
Pre-operational & Environmental Mitigation Planning for Multipurpose Hydel Projects
Pre-operational & Environmental Mitigation Planning for Multipurpose Hydel Projects
Pre-operational & Environmental Mitigation Planning for Multipurpose Hydel Projects
Pre-operational & Environmental Mitigation Planning for Multipurpose Hydel Projects
Pre-operational & Environmental Mitigation Planning for Multipurpose Hydel Projects
Pre-operational & Environmental Mitigation Planning for Multipurpose Hydel Projects
Pre-operational & Environmental Mitigation Planning for Multipurpose Hydel Projects
Pre-operational & Environmental Mitigation Planning for Multipurpose Hydel Projects
Pre-operational & Environmental Mitigation Planning for Multipurpose Hydel Projects
Pre-operational & Environmental Mitigation Planning for Multipurpose Hydel Projects
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Pre-operational & Environmental Mitigation Planning for Multipurpose Hydel Projects

  1. 1. Welcome to the Presentation on Pre-operational & Environmental Mitigation Planning for Muti-purpose Hydel Projects By Ravindra Nath Saxena Principal Chief Conservator of Forests, Madhya Pradesh
  2. 2. fxj;Lrs ioZr% fgeoUrks vj.;e~ rs i`fFkoh L;ksueLrq vFkZoosn O Mother Earth! May your Mountains be show-clad and your forests enchanting for our prosperity! Atharrva Veda
  3. 3. Statutory provision for Environment, Forest and Wildlife Clearances • Environment Impact Assessment Notification, 2006 [under Environment (Protection) Act, 1986]. • Section-2(ii), Forest (Conservation) Act, 1980. • Section-38O(g), Wildlife (Protection) Act, 1972 – NPV is 10 times in national parks and 5 times in wildlife sanctuaries; can seriously upset cost:benefit ratio. Other statutory provisions, having high impact on project planning  Panchayati-raj Extension to Scheduled Areas Act, 1996.  Scheduled Tribe & Other Forest Dwellers (Recognition of Forest Rights) Act, 2006  Governance and administration of Scheduled-V and VI areas, notified under the Constitution of India.  Issues of Land Acquisition Act.
  4. 4. Barrier Analysis to Forest (Conservation) Act, 1980 and Environment (Protection) Act, 1986; • Intricately woven “forest clearance” and “environment clearance”, but impact assessment carried by different departments of State Government & MOEF, and two different committees – FAC and EAC examine project proposals. • Land is having heterogeneous origin – forest, revenue forest, dictionary meaning conforming forests, blanket notifications. • Frequent modifications of constitution of Assessment Committees. • Absence of specifications of “parameters of impact assessments” in FCA and EPA. Parameters of “impact assessment” modified frequently by committees without any justification. Same parameter assessed by two committees. • Cumbersome, lengthy case assessment at several levels. • No well established co-relation between “forest clearance” & “environment clearance”. • Move to amend IFA and make it PESA and ST&OTFD(RFR) Act compliant – shall lead to lots of local socio-political interference.
  5. 5. THE CONSTITUTION OF INDIA (SCHEDULE – VI) SIXTH SCHEDULE [Articles 244(2) and 275(1)] Provisions as to the Administration of Tribal Areas in 1[the States of Assam, Meghalaya, Tripura and Mizoram] 1. Autonomous districts and autonomous regions.—(1) Subject to the provisions of this paragraph, the tribal areas in each item of 3[4[Parts I, II and IIA] and in Part III] of the table appended to paragraph 20 of this Schedule shall be an autonomous district. 2. Constitution of District Councils and Regional Councils.—2[(1) There shall be a District Council for each autonomous district consisting of not more than thirty members, of whom not more than four persons shall be nominated by the Governor and the rest shall be elected on the basis of adult suffrage.] (2) There shall be a separate Regional Council for each area constituted in an autonomous region under sub-paragraph (2) of paragraph 1 of this Schedule. (3) Each District Council and each Regional Council shall be a body corporate by the name respectively of “the District Council of (name of district)” and “the regional Council of (name of region)”, shall have perpetual succession and a common seal and shall by the said name sue and be sued.
  6. 6. 3. Powers of the District Councils and Regional Councils to make laws.—(1) The Regional Council for an autonomous region in respect of all areas within such region and the District Council for an autonomous district in respect of all areas within the district except those which are under the authority of Regional Councils, if any, within the district shall have power to make laws with respect to— (b) the management of any forest not being a reserved forest; (2) In this paragraph, a “reserved forest” means any area which is a reserved forest under the Assam Forest Regulation, 1891, or under any other law for the time being in force in the area in question. “3A. Additional powers of the North Cachar Hills Autonomous Council and the Karbi Anglong Autonomous Council to make laws.—(1) Without prejudice to the provisions of paragraph 3, the North Cachar Hills Autonomous Council and the Karbi Anglong Autonomous Council within their respective districts, shall have power to make laws with respect to— “3B. Additional powers of the Bodoland Territorial Council to make laws.—(1) Without prejudice to the provisions of paragraph 3, the Bodoland Territorial Council within its areas shall have power to make laws with respect to:— (ix)forests (other than reserved forests); areas within such region and the District Council for an autonomous district in respect of all areas within the district except those which are under the authority of Regional Councils, if any, within the district shall have power to make laws with respect to—
  7. 7. Provided that nothing in such laws shall prevent the compulsory acquisition of any land, whether occupied or unoccupied, for public purposes 1[by the Government of the State concerned] in accordance with the law for the time being in force authorising such acquisition; (b) the management of any forest not being a reserved forest; (c) the use of any canal or water-course for the purpose of agriculture; (d) the regulation of the practice of jhum or other forms of shifting cultivation; (e) the establishment of village or town committees or councils and their powers; (f) any other matter relating to village or town administration, including village or town police and public health and sanitation; (g) the appointment or succession of Chiefs or Headmen; (h) the inheritance of property; 2[(i) marriage and divorce;] (j) social customs. (2) In this paragraph, a “reserved forest” means any area which is a reserved forest under the Assam Forest Regulation, 1891, or under any other law for the time being in force in the area in question. 1The words “of Assam or Meghalaya, as the case may be” omitted by the North-Eastern Areas (Reorganisation) Act, 1971 (81 of 1971), s. 71(i) and Eighth Sch. (w.e.f. 21-1-1972). 2Subs. by the Assam Reorganisation (Meghalaya) Act, 1969 (55 of 1969), s. 74 and Fourth Sch., for sub-paragraph (2) (w.e.f. 2-4-1970).
  8. 8. 39. Licences or leases for the purpose of prospecting for, or extraction of, minerals.—(1) Such share of the royalties accruing each year from licences or leases for the purpose of prospecting for, or the extraction of, minerals granted by 4[the Government of the State] in respect of any area within an autonomous district as may be agreed upon between 4[the Government of the State] and the District Council of such district shall be made over to that District Council. 112. 2[Application of Acts of Parliament and of the Legislature of the State of Assam to autonomous districts and autonomous regions in the State of Assam].—(1) Notwithstanding anything in this Constitution— (a) no Act of the 3[Legislature of the State of Assam] in respect of any of the matters specified in paragraph 3 of this Schedule as matters with respect to which a District Council or a Regional Council may make laws, and no Act of the 3[Legislature of the State of Assam] prohibiting or restricting the consumption of any non-distilled alcoholic liquor shall apply to any autonomous district or autonomous region 4[in that State] unless in either case the District Council for such district or having jurisdiction over such region by public notification so directs, and the District Council in giving such direction with respect to any Act may direct that the Act shall in its application to such district or region or any part thereof have effect subject to such exceptions or modifications as it thinks fit; (b) the Governor may, by public notification, direct that any Act of Parliament or of the 3[Legislature of the State of Assam] to which the provisions of clause (a) of this sub- paragraph do not apply shall not apply to an autonomous district or an autonomous region 4[in that State], or shall apply to such district or region or any part thereof subject to
  9. 9. Sanctions issued by GOI & Central Water Commission S. No. Particulars Target date Date of submission Date of approval 1. Submission of Techno- economic Feasibility Report 2. Submission of Detailed Project Report (i) Inter-state Matters Directorate (ii) Hydrology Directorate (iii) Design Directorate (iv) CGWB Directorate (v) Irrigation Planning Directorate (vi) Agricultural Planning Directorate, MOA
  10. 10. S. No. Particulars Target date Date of submission Date of approval (vii) CSMRS Directorate (ix) Cost Appraisal Directorate 3. Environment Clearance – Form-I Application along- with proposed TOR 4. Rehabilitation & Resettlement Plan 5. Forest Clearance – submission of FCA application with various details & affidavits 6. Application for Wildlife Clearance, u/s 38O(g), WLPA to NTCA 6. NOC from Archaeological SOI
  11. 11. THE WISDOM Though obtaining clearances is taking 12 to 20 years. Criticizing provisions of environment, forest, wildlife and social clearances is not the solution of problems. Amendments shall take very long time / amendments are not possible. It is in our interest to know the legal provisions and procedures very well and obtain clearances / sanctions as early as possible. Amendment of Schedule-VI of the Constitution is not possible
  12. 12. Why C.S.R. necessary? • Established fact that rural and tribal communities can draw “sustainable livelihood” from land related vocations only – agriculture, forestry, horticulture, firewood, MFP & medicinal plants collection, grazing, etc. • Livelihood resilience and adaptability is quite limited in these societies. Can’t survive, if truncated from land. • All infra-structure, mining, thermal power plant, multipurpose river valley projects, roads, railways, transmission lines, linear projects like canals, pipelines etc fragment their land-holdings and definitely reduce their access to “natural resources”. “Sustainable Livelihood Potential” is adversly impacted
  13. 13. • All these activities adversely impact “water regime” and “soil moisture regime” of the area leading to reduced agriculture production and reduced access to natural resources. • The impacted areas are also having socio-cultural, spiritual (Dev-sthan, sacred groves), ecological & medicinal values also. • Rural & tribal communities are most vocal opponents of infrastructure projects (Dongaria Kond in Niyamgiri). Conversely urban communities receive their “compensation” and settle elsewhere amicably. Why C.S.R. necessary? “Corporate Social Responsibility” initiative is necessary to assuage their loss of livelihood & dented feelings
  14. 14. • CSR towards “human community” – MPSFDC contributing 2% of PAT and 10% of net timber revenue according to formula approved by the State Cabinet. MPFD is providing 10% of net timber revenue, 100% tendupatta revenue to communities and 100% profit to Bamboo workers. • CSR towards “Mother Earth” – because whatever humans are doing, it is causing undesirable changes in the natural resources and increasing “carbon foot-prints”. • CSR towards wildlife – Mandatory under Section-38O(g) of Wildlife (Protection) Act, 1972. Types of C.S.R.
  15. 15. • The Companies Act, 2013 provides for spending 2% of PAT for CSR activities – what happens if project management fails to earn profit due to any reason (despite destroying natural resources), consequence local communities suffer. • The CSR cannot be deferred, but should start as pre- operational activities to win-over confidence of local communities. Deploy social development scientist, sociologist, anthropologist to understand social dynamics of the project area. • Earliest start of CSR most desirable. Develop alternate Nistar area before deforestation starts. Instead of felling trees, transplant trees to agricultural-fields of R&R sites. C.S.R. Cycle for Infra-structure Projects?
  16. 16. • Linear projects like transmission lines, gas and mineral slurry pipelines, conveyor belts, railways, roads, canals are most complicated projects. CSR activities should start at conceptualization stage itself. • CSR really matters in the “public hearing” (EIA Notification, 2006) and meeting of “Gram Sabha” [under Forest (Conservation) Act, 1980 & PESA]. • MP Forest Department has carried-out CSR activities on behalf of Power Grid Corporation of India and Western Coalfields Limited. This initiative really helped in “Land Acquisition”. C.S.R. Cycle for Infra-structure Projects? Most of the corporate groups and central & state PSUs are not having any live contact with local communities. MPFD & MPSFDC possess support of 15228 JFMCs
  17. 17. • Section-135, Companies Act, 2013 – Every company having networth of Rs. 500/- crores or turn-over of Rs. 100/- crores or net-profit of Rs.5/- crore or more in any financial year shall constitute “CSR committee of Board” with at least one independent Director. • “CSR committee of Board” shall formulate and approve “CSR Plan” of the company, monitor implementation of CSR Plan. • Section-135(5) “CSR committee of Board” shall ensure that the company should spend 2% PAT of past 3 years. • Preference to the local areas of operation. • Companies (Corporate Social Responsibility Policy) Rules, 2014. Statutory provisions for C.S.R.
  18. 18. Pre-operational project planning • Appoint several social development scientists, anthropologist, sociologist for “social impact assessment”, leading to effective “Rehabilitation & Resettlement Plan”. • Immediately initiate “corporate social responsibility” prgrammes, to win-over local population. • These initiatives shall be great help in “public hearing” under EIA Notification, 2006 and resolution of “Gram Sabha” under Forest (Conservation) Act, 1980.
  19. 19. C.S.R. Activities
  20. 20. BLANKET & MOSQUITO NET DISTRIBUTION LPG DISTRIBUTION
  21. 21. UTENSILS DISTRIBUTION BICYCLE DISTRIBUTION
  22. 22. Health Camps • Health camps have been organized in 428 forest villages and 2013 JFMCs. • Beneficiaries have been provided vitamins & vaccination carried-out. • Medicines distribution & health checkup free of cost.
  23. 23. Medical Camps
  24. 24. Medical Camps
  25. 25. Joint Forest Management Committee Sports Activities • To encourage the participation of younger generation in JFM & forest protection / management system. Training of sports activities started. • Kabaddi & Volleyball Range, Division, Circle, Zone & State level competitions have been organized in 2011-14.
  26. 26. Forest Cover of India* Diversion of about 300 sq.kms. forest areas (0.04%) in next 20 years can solve the energy problems of the country. Most of these coal blocks are situated in different micro & milli-watersheds – consequently it would not cause great ecological problems. Coal Blocks are site specific projects and should get priority (S.F.R., 2011 of Forest Sites with high potential for Hydel Power Projects Also high vulnerability to Schedule-VI areas, tribal communities, FRA, Ecologically Fragile Zones
  27. 27. FORESTS AT A GLANCE • Geographical area – 32,87,263 sq. kms. • Forest area – 7,57,740 sq. kms. • Forest cover – 6,78,333 sq. kms. – the eco-resource for livlihood. • Legal status of forest area – A. Reserve Forests (RF) – 3,99,919 sq. kms. B. Protected Forests (PF) – 2,38,434 sq. kms. C. Un-classed forests – 1,36,387 • Un-culturable non-forest areas – 2,11,286 sq. kms. • Growing Stock – 4740.858 million cubic meter • Growing Stock / ha. – 74.42 cubic meter • Current Annual Increment – 8.76 million cubic meter • Current C.A.I. - 0.69 cubic meter / ha. • Potential CAI possible - 3.60 cubic meter / ha. (Peterson’s formula) • Simpson’s Biodiversity Index, Berger-Parker Species Richness Index, Shannon Weiner Biodiversity Index not provide promising picture. • Forest cover stagnant with cyclical change, qualitative deterioration of ecological resources due to scarcity of finances.
  28. 28. Red indicates that a change in vegetation is projected at that grid in the time-period of 2021-2050 and 2071-2100 (under A1B scenario). Green indicates that no change in vegetation is projected by that period. Climate Change and Forests Vegetational changes projected by 2021-2050 and 2071-2100 Based on computer simulation models of National Remote Sensing Agency & ICFRE
  29. 29. Biodiversity Vulnerable Grids of India (marked red) in the A1B scenario – for India - 2035 and 2085 Climate Change and Biodiversity Vegetational changes projected by 2021-2050 and 2071-2100
  30. 30. Salient provisions of FCA • The FCA broadly covers 4 aspects of forest management • The following orders can be passed by State Governments / competent authorities, only after the concurrence of the MoEF, GOI: (i) De-notification of forest land (under Sections – 27 & 34A of IFA) (ii) Diversion of “forest land” for “non-forest” purposes (forest land being diverted for forest management is exempted from this provision) – Explanation inserted below Section-2. FCA and FRA are most important statutes for project proponents
  31. 31. Continue… (iii) Assignment of forest land to persons, individuals, corporate bodies, JVC, Committees, Societies, etc., (except forest land provided to wholly Government owned companies for afforestation of forest species) (iv) Forest crops cannot be felled / treated except under a duly approved working plan. The deviations of sanctioned prescriptions also require sanction of MoEF, GOI.
  32. 32. Applicability of FCA • The terms “forests” and “forest land” have not been defined neither in IFA nor in FCA • These terms have been defined in the order dated 12.12.1996 of the Hon’ble Supreme Court (Civil Writ Petition 202/95, T.N. Godavarman Thirumulkpad ver. Union of India & others)
  33. 33. APPLICABILITY OF FCA FOREST LANDS FOREST DEPARTMENT •RESERVE FOREST •PROTECTED FOREST (demarcated, undemarcated) •UNCLASSED FORESTS REVENUE DEPARTMENT • REVENUE FOREST • PRIVATE FOREST • ANYAREA RECORDED AS FOREST • AREAS DEFINED AS “FOREST” IN DICTONARY MEANING. OTHER DEPARTMENTS/ MINISTERIES • ALL DIVERTED FOREST LAND IF NOT DENOTIFIED • FOREST AREAS OF DAMS/ RESERVOIRS • FIELD FIRING RANGES • FOREST LAND PROVIDED ON LEASE
  34. 34. COMPENSATORY AFFORESTATION • Identification and transfer of non-forest land is most crucial issue. • Compensatory afforestation is one of the most important conditions stipulated by the Central Government while approving proposals for dereservation or diversion of forest land for non- forest uses. • All such proposals should submit a comprehensive scheme for compensatory afforestation. • Accordingly a detailed compensatory afforestation scheme along with details of non-forest /degraded forest area identified for compensatory afforestation, map, etc, is required to be submitted in the prescribed form.
  35. 35. • The non-availability of non-forest land for CA would be accepted by the Central Government only on the Certificate from the Chief Secretary. • As an exception to 3.2. (i) above, compensatory afforestation may be raised over degraded forest land twice in extent of the forest area being diverted • For extraction of minor minerals from the river beds. (however, if forest area to be diverted is above 500 hectares, compensatory afforestation over equivalent area of degraded forest shall be required to be done instead of twice the area being diverted subject to a minimum of 1000 hectares CA.
  36. 36. TWO STAGE CLEARANCE
  37. 37. Flow chart for obtaining “environment clearance”
  38. 38. Post “environment clearance” monitoring mechanism
  39. 39. Aftermath of FCA clearance  Depositing funds for CA, CAT plan, NPV, Wildlife Habitat Management Plan, CAT Plan, plantation under transmission lines necessary for obtaining final diversion order.  Diverted area is not denotified, the State Forest Department still retains the propietary rights and all principal forest and wildlife Acts apply.  Project proponent is not allowed to mortgage forest land and raise finances.  Re-diversion of forest land is not allowed, except under prior approval of MOEF, GOI.  Invariably water bodies are notified as wildlife sanctuary, fishing prohibited – not mere formality.  Leases cannot be granted in draw-down area of dams.  Implementation of CAT & CAD Plan is mandatory.  Monitoring every 5th year.
  40. 40. Project Location
  41. 41. Topo-sheets of Survey of India For CAT Plan and CAD Plan use maps of scale of 1:2,50,000 or 1:10,00,000
  42. 42. Survey Precautions • Contours of 2 meters and 4 meters below full reservoir level (FRL). • Mostly GOI doesn’t allow felling in 4 meters strip below FRL. Excellent snags for roosting of aves. • All surface diversion area should be clearly demarcated on the relevant maps. • Underground canals also attract FCA (NPV payable is 50%).
  43. 43. Diver sion Site DISTRICT FOREST COVER MAP OF SURVEY OF INDIA Buffer Zone Distance from protecte d areas Animal Activity Areas
  44. 44. Exhibit Location of important components, wildlife migration routes & Tiger / Elephant Reserve Corridors Tara Coal Block located at the fringe of Hasdeo Arand ICPL Power Plant site
  45. 45. Documents required for FC, EC and wildlife clearances Flora  Characterization of forest types in the study area as per the data available in the Forest Working Plan and Silviculture – Champion & Seth (1968).  General vegetation pattern and floral diversity viz. trees, shrubs, grasses, herbs, significant micro-flora, etc.  Vegetation shall cover various life-forms of plants including lichens and orchids.  Species frequency, density, abundance shall be estimated based on primary data collection.  Biodiversity index (Shannon–Wiener Diversity index) and Importance Value Index (IVI) of the species to be provided.  Economically important species viz. medicinal, timber, fuel wood etc.  Flora under Rare, Endangered and Threatened (RET) categories would be documented using International Union for the Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) criteria and Red Data List of Botanical Survey of India & Zoological Survey of India along with economic significance.  For RET species, specimens will be collected along with GPS readings to facilitate rehabilitation. (obtain permission u/s 12 of WLPA)  Cropping and Horticulture pattern and practices in the study area
  46. 46. Maps and satellite imageries Forest maps are vital for silviculture crop assessment and determination of Net Present Value (vital document)
  47. 47. Forest Satellite Imagery – only land-use discernible, legal status cannot be ascertained “Gap Light Analyser” is available for Crown Density determination. The forest crop should be analysed on crown density, site quality, regeneration, Yield Table parameters, Basal Area calculation based on Wedge Prism data.
  48. 48. Sample Plot Grids & Biodiversity indexing
  49. 49. * N.B. Kind attention invited to blanks, under stocked and encroachments Alternate Diversion Area in Revised Proposal, if any
  50. 50. Tree Enumeration & Biodiversity Assessment • Biodiversity indexing – Shannon-Weiner Index , Brillouin Index, Brillouin Eveness Index, Simpson’s Index , Margalef Index, McIntosh's Measure of Diversity, Berger-Parker Index etc.
  51. 51. Sample Plot Photographs for crown density and basal area determination by Wedge Prism
  52. 52. Fauna  Inventorisation of terrestrial wildlife including reptiles and herpetofauna, their present status in the project area  Zoogeographic distribution / affinities, endemic, threatened and endangered species RET species.  Avifauna - Status, Resident / Migratory / Passage migrants, Impact of project on threatened / endangered taxa, if any, Butterflies, if any found in the area  RET faunal species are to be classified as per IUCN Red Data list or as per different schedule of Indian Wilde Life Protection Act, 1972.  Effect on fish migration and habitat degradation due to project.  Existence of National Park, Sanctuary, Biosphere, Reserve Forest etc. in the study area if any, would be detailed. Documents required for FC, EC and wildlife clearance - II
  53. 53. Most threatened wildlife species - I
  54. 54. Most threatened wildlife species - II
  55. 55. Most threatened floral species - I
  56. 56. Net Present Value • Soil Expectation Value (forest increment) is compensated for 50 years in forest diversion cases. • Calculated by Faustmann’s formula. • Most crucial factor in cost : benefit analysis and project finance. • NPV has been imposed under orders dated 29th October, 2002; 30th October, 2002; 1st August, 2003 and 28th March, 2003. • All FCA cases diverted after 30th October, 2003 are liable to pay “Net Present Value” (NPV). No escape from NPV, the only option is compliance mind-set Or the project would suffer litigation badly
  57. 57. NPV rates sanctioned vide Circular dated 5th February, 2009 of MOEF, GOI Eco-Class - I Type of Forests (Champion & Seth, 1968) Eco-Class - I Tropical wet Evergreen forests; Tropical Semi-evergreen forests and Tropical Moist Deciduous forests. Eco-Class – II Littoral & Swamp forests. Eco-Class - III Tropical Dry Deciduous forests Eco-Class - IV Tropical Thorn forests and Tropical Sry Evergreen forests. Eco-Class - V Sub-tropical Broad Leaved Hill forests; Sub-tropical Pine forests; Sub-tropical Dry Evergreen forests. Eco-Class - VI Montane Wet Temperate forests; Himalayan Moist Temperate forests; Himalayan Dry Temperate forests; Sub- alpine forests; Moist Alpine Scrub and Dry Alpine Scrub forests.
  58. 58. Eco- value Class and NPV rates (in lakh Rs.) Class-I Class-II Class- III Class- IV Class-V Class- VI Very Dense Forests 10.43 10.43 08.87 06.26 9.39 09.91 Dense Forests 09.39 09.39 08.03 05.63 08.45 08.97 Open Forests 07.30 07.30 06.26 04.38 06.57 06.99 NPV Rates applicable N.B. Most of RVP and Hydel Projects are situated in “very dense forests” only.
  59. 59. • These NPV rates were valid till 5th February, 2012 only. The new rates are under processing – may raise from 245% to 375%. Steep rise anticipated in NPV. • Diversion in national parks would attract TEN times and wildlife sanctuaries will invite FIVE times of NPV. Most crucial factors in project financing. • NPV rates should be studied and taken care-off since beginning to avoid financial mis-management or facing litigation. NPV Rates applicable
  60. 60. Transplantation of middle aged trees
  61. 61. Effect of fragmentation of forest & wildlife habitat corridor
  62. 62. Sharp-edge Effect of roads & canals
  63. 63. Sharp-edge effect of roads and canals
  64. 64. Use of geo-textile for surface stabilisation
  65. 65. VEGETATIVE CONTOUR BUNDING
  66. 66. Catchment Area Treatment Plan
  67. 67. Issues related to wildlife and Wildlife (Protection) Act, 1972 National Parks - Conservation Reserve - 2 Wildlife Sanctuaries - Community Reserve - Nil Tiger Reserves - 38 Elephant Reserves - 64 Denotification virtually impossible (HSC order dated 13th November, 2000
  68. 68. Present & Potential “Protected Areas” of India, WII
  69. 69. PROTECTED AREAS & WILDLIFE (PROTECTION) ACT, 1972 Salient features • Geographical area (including forest area) under PA network – 1,55,348 sq. kms. • New PAs are not being notified. Impact of Wildlife (Protection) Act, 1972 • Rights cannot be acquired or traded u/s 20, WLPA. • Most of RF is part of protected areas. • Exploitation not possible under Section-29, WLPA. • Ban on exploitation & diversion of protected areas under orders of the Hon’ble Supreme Court. The habitats of protected areas cannot be used for ‘mining purposes” due to prohibitory legal regime. Even non- forest area of protected areas cannot be used (Tahir Ali ver. State of Madhya Pradseh
  70. 70. Typical forest & village mosaic of a protected area All non-forest areas situated within external boundary of protected areas are part of inviolate wildlife habitat. Gopal Das Mittal ver. State of Madhya Pradesh
  71. 71. APPLICABILITY OF WLPA Protected areas FOREST DEPARTMENT • National Parks, • Wildlife Sanctuaries, • Conservation Reserve • Community Reserve. Species specified in Schedule-I, II, III, IV & VI having jurisdiction over 6800 species (based on the Storer & Usinger Classification Specified Species Specified international conventions
  72. 72.  The statutory body of National Tiger Conservation Authority (NTCA) constituted under provisions of Wildlife (Protection) Amendment act, 2006.  Section-38O(g) : NTCA to ensure that – Tiger Reserves and areas linking one protected area or tiger reserve with another protected area or tiger reserves are not diverted for ecologically unsustainable use, except in public interest and with the approval of NBWL on the advice of NTCA.
  73. 73. Section-38V(4) : the State Government while preparing a Tiger Conservation Plan ensure livelihood of local communities. The expression Tiger Reserve includes: i. Core or critical tiger habitat - area of national parks and sanctuaries, where it has been established on the basis of scientific and objective criteria and notified by the State Government in consultation with Expert Committee. ii. Buffer or peripheral area - consisting of the area peripheral to critical tiger habitat or core area………., where a lesser degree of habitat protection is required to ensure the integrity of the critical tiger habitat with adequate dispersal for tiger species, and which aim at promoting co-existence of between wildlife and human activity with due recognition of the ……………………., the limits of such areas are determined on the basis of scientific and objective criteria in consultation with the concerned Gram Sabha and Expert Committee constituted for this purpose.
  74. 74. Tiger Corridor Plan • Details of man-wildlife conflict to determine true status of wildlife. Compensation paid to villagers for death, injuries and crop. • Assessment of forests crop in the context of wildlife – availability of forage, water and cover. Connecting corridors – porosity, fragmentation and juxta-position effects. • Assessment of wildlife carried out by WII, wildlife recorded at transects laid in 2008 and 2010. Wildlife Impact Assessment and Wildlife Habitat Conservation Plan.
  75. 75. Preparation, integration and sanction of “Wildlife Habitat Conservation Plan”. Preparation of “Wildlife Habitat Conservation Plan” by project proponent / consultant and obtain comments of CWLW Apply to CWLW for preparation of “Wildlife Habitat Conservation Plan” under Section-12 of WLPA Obtain comments of State Wildlife Board on “Wildlife Habitat Conservation Plan” Obtain comments NTCA on “Wildlife Habitat Conservation Plan” Obtain comments of Standing Committee of National Board for Wildlife on “Wildlife Habitat Conservation Plan” If protected areas are involved If protected areas area not involved Link with Forest Appraisal Committee
  76. 76. Other Issues of “Wildlife Habitat Conservation Plan” and Wildlife (Protection) Act, 1972  Submission of “Wildlife Habitat Conservation Plan” at initial stage not mandatory; but its formulation at later higher stage insisted.  No Guideline available for carrying out “Wildlife Impact Assessment” and preparation of “Wildlife Habitat Conservation Plan”. No specific format for submission of plan.  For preparation of “Wildlife Habitat Conservation Plan” , the Wildlife Institute of India is awfully busy. NGOs are neither having expertise nor possess capacity to prepare or synthesize requirement of “wildlife” and “mining “ sectors.  NGOs – no capacity for “mitigation planning”.
  77. 77.  Few experts understand “wildlife impact assessment”; still fewer possess expertise for “Wildlife Rehabilitation & Resettlement Planning”. Develop non-statutory policy regime.  Wildlife corridors and buffer zones [ref Section- 38O(g) and 38V(4)] are really fast emerging vital issues. NTCA permission mandatory. Virtually threatening coal, power and steel sector.  Area of underground mine being considered in study & calculation of “fragmentation”, “porosity” & “juxtaposition” effects.  Asiatic Elephants – seasonal traversing for food & water is mis-understood as “migration routes”. No data available for elephant ecology, physiology, elephant – vegetation dynamics etc.  Radio-collar Elephant male and female with calf societies to study ecology, ethology and migration routes.
  78. 78. Issues related to Scheduled Tribe & Other Traditional Forest Dweller (Recognition of Forest Right) Act, 2006
  79. 79. • STOTFD(RFR) Act, 2006 enacted and became operational on 1st January, 2007. • Jurisdiction over all types of forest areas – RF, PF, revenue forests, village forests, dictionary meaning of forests etc. • Two types of rights can be claimed: A. Individuals can claim upto 4.00ha per person. B. Community can claim any area (without limit). • Open ended Act. Claims can be put-up any time. • Forest areas not to be de-notified i.e. both STOTFD(RFR) Act, 2006 and Forest (Conservation) Act, 1980 shall apply. • No involuntary eviction / settlement – huge cost shall be involved. • Adverse impact on linear projects e.g. canals, roads, transmission line, skyline crane, conveyor belts, pipelines, Issues related to Scheduled Tribe & Other Traditional Forest Dweller (Recognition of Forest Right) Act, 2007
  80. 80. • Topsy turvey settlement process – Gram sabha, Block Committee and ultimate decision at District Committee. Pressure to accept all claims. • Bamboos have been brought under STOTFD(RFR) Act, 2006. Authority to issue “transit pass” assigned to Panchayats (particularly Maharashtra). • No procedure provided in STOTFD(RFR) Act, 2006 to acquire once settled rights of individuals or communities. • Improper and ambiguous record maintenance by Deptt. Of Tribal Welfare.
  81. 81. A.MOEF has issued two specific circulars dated 30th July, 2009 and 03rd August, 2009 for this purpose. The salient provisions are:  For every proposal the State Government shall certify that complete process for identification and settlement of rights under STOTFD(RFR)Act, 2006 has been carried out for entire area.  Each Gram Sabha to certify that all formalities / process under STOTFD(RFR)Act, 2006 is completed and consent provided.  State Government shall certify that the diversion of forest land for facilities managed by the Government under Section-3(2), STOTFD(RFR) Act,2006 is complete. Inter-relationship of Scheduled Tribe & Other Forest Dweller (Recognition of Forest Right) Act and Forest (Conservation) Act
  82. 82.  State Government shall certify that the proposal for such diversion (with full details of project and its implications in vernacular / local language) have been placed before each Gram Sabha.  State Government shall certify that discussions and decisions on such proposal had taken place only when there was a quorum of minimum 50% of Gram Sabha present and voting.  Obtain and enclose written consent / rejection of Gram Sabha for the project proposal. The Gram sabha has provided their consent for diversion proposal, compensatory package and mitigation measures.  State Government shall certify that the rights of “Primitive Tribal Groups” and “Pre Agricultural Communities” where applicable, have been specifically safeguarded as per Section- 3(1)(c), STOTFD(RFR)Act, 2006.
  83. 83. • The Section-3(2) provides that, notwithstanding anything contained in FCA; the Central Government shall provide for diversion of forest land for following facilities managed by the Government ; which involve felling of trees not exceeding 75 trees per hectare. • Schools, Dispensary or Hospital, Aanganwadi, Fair Price Shops, electric and telecommunication lines, tanks and other minor wate bodies, drinking water supply and water pipelines, water or rain water harvesting structures, minor irrigation canals, non- conventional sources of energy, skill upgradation and vocational training centres, roads, and community centres. • The forest land can be diverted with 2 riders – A. The diverted land should be less than 1 ha. in each case. B. The diversion project has been recommended by Gram Sabha. Scheduled Tribe & Other Forest Dweller (Recognition of Forest Right) Act and diversion of forest land for community purposes
  84. 84. • Ministry of Tribal affairs, GOI vide Circular No. 23011/15/2008-S.G.II dated 18th May, 2009 has issued instructions under Section-3(2) for seeking prior approval: A. Every user agency shall apply in “Form-A” and place it before General Assembly of Gram Sabha. B. The quorum of 50% should be present and adopt the resolution. C. After obtaining consent of Gram Sabha – the user agency shall submit proposal to Range Officer. D. Range Officer shall inspect the site and record comments for diversion of the area and submit proposal to DFO (in Form-B) E. The DFO shall decide matter within 4 weeks and inform Range Officer and District Level Committee (DLC). RO would demand area and hand over to user agency. In case of rejection of proposal final decision shall be taken by (DLC). F. Land diverted for a specific purpose shall not to be allowed to be used for any other purpose. G. The DFO shall furnish information to Nodal Officer, then compiled data shall be routed through Secretary, Tribal Welfare to Ministry of Tribal Affairs. GOI.
  85. 85. Transmission Lines • Poaching through electrocution is a big issue, particularly in Buffer Zones of PAs. • Low height plantations below conductors. Funds for management of areas.
  86. 86. Aquatic Ecology Aquatic Ecology  Aqua- fauna like macro-invertebrates, zoo-plankton, phyto-planktons, benthos, primary productivity, etc.  Conservation Status  Fish and Fisheries  Fish migrations, if any  Breeding grounds of Crocodiles, Gharials, Dolphins etc.  Impact of dam building on fish migration and habitat degradation.  Impact on aquatic ecology at least 10 km downstream of the dam
  87. 87. Monitoring of Project Approval Status - I Date of commencement : Time period : 12 months S. No Particulars Target Date Date of Submission Date of approval Remarks 1 Submission Techno Economic feasibility report 2 Submission Detailed Project Report i) Inter State Matters (ISM) Directorate ii) Hydrology Directorate Yield NZE Flood iii) Design Dte. iii) CGWB Dte.
  88. 88. Monitoring of Project Approval Status -II S. No Particulars Target Date Date of Submission Date of approval Remarks iv) Irrigation Planning Dte. v) Ministry of Agriculture vi)CSMRS Dte. vii) Cost Appraisal Dte. 3 Form-I application along with proposed ToR 4 Rehabilitation & Resettlement plan 5 Forest diversion Case 6 No objection certificate has been obtained from Archaeological SOI
  89. 89. EIA & EMP Studies To carryout EIA / EMP study submit an application to MoEF to get NABET accreditation for carrying out environmental studies for irrigation project. Also obtain services of a NABET accreditated consultant to carryout the Environment studies for Hydel Power Projects The following activities carry-out in the EIA study i) Irrigation Planning ii) Socio Economic survey iii) Catchment Area Treatment Plan iv) Command Area Development Plan v) Rehabilitation & Resettlement Plan vi) Dam Break Analysis
  90. 90. Activity Schedule for EIA & EMP Studies -I S. No. Requirement as per TOR issued by MoEF Weightage % 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 % Progress Remarks 1 Scope of EIA Study 2 2 Details of the Project and Site 2 Completed 3 Description of Environment and Baseline Data (To be collected for 03 seasons) 10 4 Details of the Methodology for collection of Base line data 2 5 Methodology for Collection of Biodiversity Data 4 6 Components of the EIA Study A. Physical and Chemical Environment (i) Geophysical & Geophysical Aspects and SeismoTechtonics 3 (ii) Meteorology, Air and Noise 3 (iii) Soil Characteristics 5
  91. 91. Activity Schedule for EIA & EMP Studies -II S. No. Requirement as per TOR issued by MoEF Weightag e % 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 % Progres s Remark s (iv) Remote Sensing and GIS Studies 2 (v) Water Quality 5 B. Water Environment & Hydrology 5 C. Biological Environment Flora 5 Fauna 5 D. Aquatic Ecology 3 E. Irrigation and Cropping Pattern 2 F. Socio Economic 2 7 Impact Prediction and Mitigation Measures 3 8 Environment Impact Analysis 5
  92. 92. S. No . Requirement as per TOR issued by MoEF Weightag e % 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 % Progres s Remarks 9 Environment Management Plan (EMP) 1 (i) Catchment Area Treatment (CAT) Plan 3 (ii) Command Area Development (CAD) Plan 3 2 (iii) Compensatory Afforestation 3 (iv) Biodiversity and Wild Life Conservation & Management Plan 5 (v) Resettlement and Rehabilitation (R & R) Plan 7 Activity Schedule for EIA & EMP Studies -III
  93. 93. Activity Schedule for EIA & EMP Studies -IV S. No. Requirement as per TOR issued by MoEF Weightage % 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 % Progress Remarks (vi) Plan for Green Belt Development 2 (vii) Reservoir Rim Treatment Plan 3 2 (viii Plan for Restoration and Landscaping 2 2 (ix) Fisheries Conservation & Management Plan 2 (x) Dam Break Analysis 2 Completed Submitted to NVDA on 4-4- 2013 10 Report Compilation -
  94. 94. Monitoring of the status of work performed – primary data collection -I Description Total works to be done Works completed Remaining works Ambient air quality Three seasons (summer, monsoon and winter) Ambient noise level Three seasons (summer, monsoon and winter)
  95. 95. Status of work performed – primary data collection -II Description Total works to be done Works completed Remaining works Water quality Three seasons (summer, monsoon and winter) Soil quality Three seasons (summer, monsoon and winter) Terrestrial Ecology Three seasons (summer, monsoon and winter)
  96. 96. Status of work performed – primary data collection -III Description Total works to be done Works completed Remaining works Fisheries Three seasons (summer, monsoon and winter) Land Use Through satellite imagery
  97. 97. Status of work to be performed – secondary data collection -I Physico-chemical aspects  Topography of the area  Regional Geology of the study area.  Seismicity of the study area.  Meteorology of the area for the nearest IMD stations covering parameters, i.e., rainfall, temperature, relative humidity, wind speed, etc.  Design Discharge and its RI (Recurrence interval)  Water availability for the project, sedimentation rate, etc. as available in the Engineering Reports
  98. 98. Status of work to be performed – secondary data collection - II Ecological aspects • Information on general vegetation pattern and floral diversity viz. - trees, shrubs, grasses, herbs • Presence of economically important species in the project as well as the study area • Presence of medicinal plants in the project as well as the study area • Presence of Rare, Endangered and Threatened floral species as per the categorization of Botanical Survey of India's Red Data list
  99. 99. Status of work to be performed – secondary data collection - III Ecological aspects - • Inventory of Birds, mammals, reptiles, amphibians and insects reported and observed in the study area • Presence of Rare, Endangered and Threatened faunal species as per the categorization of different schedules of Wildlife (Protection) Act, 1972 • Existence of barriers and corridors for wild animals, if any, in the study area • Presence of National Park, Sanctuary, Biosphere, Reserve Forest etc. in the project area and the study area
  100. 100. Status of work to be performed – secondary data collection - IV Socio-economic aspects • Demography and socio-economic analysis based on last available census data for the entire study area. • Agriculture related information including cropping pattern, crop yields, fertilizer use, source of irrigation, etc. • Source of water for various uses • Livestock holding pattern • Incidence of various water-borne and vector-borne diseases • Health facilities • Educational facilities • Major industries (including agro-based industries) within study area. • Archaeological and historical monuments, tourism infrastructure, if any, within the study area.
  101. 101. Schedule for Completion of Balance Work Activity Completion Schedule Submission of Form-A for Forestry Clearance Submission of revised PFR and Form-I for ToR Clearance TOR clearance by MoEF Field studies for summer season Field studies for Monsoon season Socio-economic survey of PAFs Submission of Draft EIA Report Comments from client on Draft Report Submission of Draft Final Report Public hearing on the Draft Final Report Preparation of Final Report incorporating the concerns of stakeholders raised during the public hearing and submission of Final Report to MOEF for Environmental Clearance
  102. 102. Remote Sensing & GIS Studies Remote sensing & GIS studies  Project layout on contour map of ground elevation.  Delineation of critically degraded areas in the catchment area intercepted at the dam site  Drainage pattern.
  103. 103. Socio-economic Aspect Socio-Economic aspects  Demographic profile  Economic structure  Development profile  Agricultural practices  Cultural and aesthetics sites  Infrastructure facilities: education, health and hygiene, communication network, etc.  Major industries within study area.  Presence of important economic mineral deposits, if any.
  104. 104. Geological & Geophysical Studies Geological and Geophysical Aspects  Geography & physiography of the project area.  Regional Geology and structure of the catchment.  Seismicity, tectonics and history of past earthquakes in the area.  Critical review of the geological features around the project area.
  105. 105. Study & Design of Earthquake parameters Study of Designated Earthquake Parameters • A site specific study of earthquake parameters shall be conducted. • Approval of the NCSDP (National Committee of Seismic Design Parameters), Central Water Commission, New Delhi will be obtained for the results of the site specific earth quake design parameters.
  106. 106. Hydrology of the Basin Hydrology of the basin  Hydro-meteorology, drainage systems  Catastrophic events like cloud bursts and flash floods, if any would be documented  A Gauge & Discharge station would be established at a suitable location to record the inflow as well as the sediment concentration of the river water during the 3 seasons of observations particularly during the lean season and during the monsoon season  Recording of data at G-D-S stations will continue during the life of the project.  Graph of 10-daily discharges before and after the project at the dam site immediately below the dam shall be provided in the CEIA study.  For estimation of Sedimentation rate direct sampling of river flow shall be done during EIA to get actual silt flow rate (expressed in ha m/ km2/year). The one year of EIA study shall be incorporated in the CEIA report.  Water availability for the project, minimum & maximum flows and the aquatic fauna  Design discharge and its recurrence interval
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