Webinar Agile Presentation V.1.0
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  • fMRI is an expensive tool (the machine costs are in the millions), creating the necessity to locate studies in a hospital setting, and there are limitations as to the activities that can be completed while scanning takes place (e.g. it would not be possible to test the use of websites inside the machine). EEG has advantages of relatively lower cost and vastly increased portability and manoeuvrability.
  • fMRI is an expensive tool (the machine costs are in the millions), creating the necessity to locate studies in a hospital setting, and there are limitations as to the activities that can be completed while scanning takes place (e.g. it would not be possible to test the use of websites inside the machine). EEG has advantages of relatively lower cost and vastly increased portability and manoeuvrability.
  • fMRI is an expensive tool (the machine costs are in the millions), creating the necessity to locate studies in a hospital setting, and there are limitations as to the activities that can be completed while scanning takes place (e.g. it would not be possible to test the use of websites inside the machine). EEG has advantages of relatively lower cost and vastly increased portability and manoeuvrability.
  • fMRI is an expensive tool (the machine costs are in the millions), creating the necessity to locate studies in a hospital setting, and there are limitations as to the activities that can be completed while scanning takes place (e.g. it would not be possible to test the use of websites inside the machine). EEG has advantages of relatively lower cost and vastly increased portability and manoeuvrability.
  • fMRI is an expensive tool (the machine costs are in the millions), creating the necessity to locate studies in a hospital setting, and there are limitations as to the activities that can be completed while scanning takes place (e.g. it would not be possible to test the use of websites inside the machine). EEG has advantages of relatively lower cost and vastly increased portability and manoeuvrability.
  • fMRI is an expensive tool (the machine costs are in the millions), creating the necessity to locate studies in a hospital setting, and there are limitations as to the activities that can be completed while scanning takes place (e.g. it would not be possible to test the use of websites inside the machine). EEG has advantages of relatively lower cost and vastly increased portability and manoeuvrability.
  • fMRI is an expensive tool (the machine costs are in the millions), creating the necessity to locate studies in a hospital setting, and there are limitations as to the activities that can be completed while scanning takes place (e.g. it would not be possible to test the use of websites inside the machine). EEG has advantages of relatively lower cost and vastly increased portability and manoeuvrability.
  • fMRI is an expensive tool (the machine costs are in the millions), creating the necessity to locate studies in a hospital setting, and there are limitations as to the activities that can be completed while scanning takes place (e.g. it would not be possible to test the use of websites inside the machine). EEG has advantages of relatively lower cost and vastly increased portability and manoeuvrability.
  • fMRI is an expensive tool (the machine costs are in the millions), creating the necessity to locate studies in a hospital setting, and there are limitations as to the activities that can be completed while scanning takes place (e.g. it would not be possible to test the use of websites inside the machine). EEG has advantages of relatively lower cost and vastly increased portability and manoeuvrability.
  • fMRI is an expensive tool (the machine costs are in the millions), creating the necessity to locate studies in a hospital setting, and there are limitations as to the activities that can be completed while scanning takes place (e.g. it would not be possible to test the use of websites inside the machine). EEG has advantages of relatively lower cost and vastly increased portability and manoeuvrability.
  • fMRI is an expensive tool (the machine costs are in the millions), creating the necessity to locate studies in a hospital setting, and there are limitations as to the activities that can be completed while scanning takes place (e.g. it would not be possible to test the use of websites inside the machine). EEG has advantages of relatively lower cost and vastly increased portability and manoeuvrability.

Webinar Agile Presentation V.1.0 Webinar Agile Presentation V.1.0 Presentation Transcript

  • User Experience Research Centre fhios The Media Centre 3-8 Carburton Street London W1W 5AJ www.fhios.com www.fhiosinsights.com Dr Martin Hicks, PhD, MSc, BSc (Hons.) Erdeniz Hassan MSc, BSc (Hons.) 12 th November 2009 Webinar: Usagility - Agile usability for rapid development
      • Established in 2002, now with around 300 clients
      • Over 30 full time staff, who are highly qualified and commercially experienced
      • Specialists in customer experience strategy, research and design
      • Experience across all platforms including digital (e.g. web, intranets, mobile devices, PDA’s, i-TV, etc.), call centres, retail environments and physical products (e.g. laptops, printers, etc.)
  • Presenters ERDENIZ HASSAN, MSc, BSc (Hons) Erdeniz holds a MSc in Human Centred Systems from City University. He has a wealth of knowledge of conducting user testing sessions and heuristic evaluations. His main interests include eye tracking this is evident within his thesis which is titled ‘Seeing the web the way we want them to: The benefits of eye tracking for web design.’ Erdeniz is a Senior research consultant at fhios. Dr. MARTIN HICKS, Ph.D. MSc. BSc. (Hons.) Martin holds a Ph.D. in Information Visualisation and Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) from the University of Nottingham. He gained a Masters degree in Ergonomics with HCI in 1999 from University College London. Before joining fhios, Martin worked as a Teaching Fellow at the University of Essex and as a Usability Specialist for Microsoft Research Cambridge. He has published widely and has gained experience in user interface design and usability studies based on mobile communication and web-based applications. Martin is a Senior research consultant at fhios.
  • Agenda
    • What is agile usability?
    • Why agile usability?
      • Benefits & issues
    • Case study: Agile usability for a financial services provider
    • Conclusions and recommendations
    • Questions
  • What is agile usability?
    • Agile methods has roots in software engineering, a well known process, e.g. Extreme Programming (XP):
      • Code implementation occurs in small increments & iterations
      • XP teamwork, e.g., paired programming
      • Small releases are delivered to the customer after each development cycle
      • Maintain tight communication between stakeholders and programmers
    • Agile approach to interface design has been questioned (Memmel, 2006):
      • Continuous changes to UI may conflict with users’ expectations & learnability - may lead to user dissatisfaction
      • Evaluating small releases with stakeholders does not guarantee the system provides a consistent conceptual, navigational or content model
  • What is agile usability?
    • Neilsen (2008) - problems with agile approach:
      • Breaking tasks down into smaller user stories can obscure total user experience - features are developed inconsistently
    • As a solution:.
      • Usability testing quickly and repeatedly
      • ‘ Parallel tracks’ allows usability work to be done one step ahead of development
      • Low fidelity prototypes
    • Patton (2008) proposes best practice guidelines for adding UX to agile development, including:
      • UX practitioners are part of customer/product team
      • Parallel track development
      • User validation
      • Leverage user time for multiple activities
      • Low fidelity prototyping
      • Design facilitation
  • Why agile usability? – Benefits & issues
    • Key benefits of integrating user experience in agile environments :
      • Feedback & validation provided at earlier stage during development lifecycle
      • Progression of products can be tracked
      • Feedback can be directly fed into next iteration
      • Modifications need not be restricted to iterations
      • Reduced costs
    • But; for UX to be effective in agile environments, key factors should be addressed:
      • A responsive design team able to work on design during iterations
      • Ongoing communication between UX team and developers (co-located is best)
      • Iterative testing of functions should not obscure the holistic user experience
      • Overarching requirements should not be overlooked
      • Project lifecycle should not be too far advanced
  • Case study: Agile usability for a financial services provider
    • Context
      • Financial services provider redesigned sites for mortgage, savings and bank accounts products – required:
        • 3 iterations of usability testing for each product
    • Objectives
      • Understand the user experience of prototype sites with focus on:
        • Navigation, content, ease of use, search, consistency, graphic design
    • Design
      • Testing over 3 weeks, 45 participants split into 3 groups of 15
        • Each group (of 15) reviewed one prototype site (mortgages, savings or bank accounts)
        • Each group (of 15) further split into 3 groups of 5, each group (of 5) in iteration 1, 2 or 3
    • Activities
      • Participant observation
      • Talk aloud protocols
      • Participant interviews and debriefing
      • Questionnaire completion
  • Case study: Agile usability for a financial services provider Overview of agile user testing and development iterations
  • Case study: Agile usability for a financial services provider
    • Testing priorities
      • Priorities based on product complexity:
        • Most complex first (mortgages, then savings and bank accounts)
      • 1 st and 2 nd iterations of mortgages were tested, general findings fed into savings prototype
        • Cycle repeated for savings and bank accounts
        • Findings fed into final iterations of all 3 prototypes
    Testing iterations process
  • Case study: Agile usability for a financial services provider
    • Summary reports
      • In addition to debriefs, developers received UX summary reports following each test iteration:
        • ‘ Evolving’ reports presented findings from all iterations for each of the prototypes tested
        • Helped validate the relevant usability issues exposed
  • Case study: Agile usability for a financial services provider Task findings
  • Case study: Agile usability for a financial services provider 5.8 5.9 5.10 Annotated prototype
  • Case study: Agile usability for a financial services provider
    • Conclusions
      • Ongoing debrief and reporting process helped developers to quickly identify outstanding or new issues with the prototypes
      • 70% of usability issues were identified in the first round of iterative testing
        • Number of issues diminished as prototypes were modified and refined following testing iterations
    • Agile approach enabled:
      • Fast turnaround on subsequent testing iterations to work within ‘sprint’ and ‘scrum’
      • Continuing user validation culture between UX consultants and developers
      • Costs to be reduced as agile testing can support multiple projects on a smaller budget
  • Agile usability – Points to consider
    • Agile testing can be beneficial in the right context, but need to consider:
      • Reporting can be problematic if you set ambitions too high – need to be concise
      • Project objectives should be explicit and signed off before project starts
      • Leverage the opportunity to test changes to the prototype
      • Close client contact is essential
      • Discuss with developers the time needed to implement design changes between iterations
    Benefit to clients is that agile testing enables development with high user acceptance on comparatively small budgets Further research could identify the optimal iterations and time frame required to develop products with fewest usability issues
  • Questions? Martin Hicks: mhicks@fhios.com Erdeniz Hassan: ehassan@fhios.com For copies of presentation or further info on fhios services: marketing@fhios.com