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  • http://education.mit.edu/papers/seriousgames.htm
  • Numeric: give participants certain parameters (budgets, number of units, costs, etc.) and ask them to make decisions based on them. For example, a supply chain simulation that tests learners' ability to make good decisions might give them data about production, costs, delivery times, and other parameters that should be included in any decisions about whether to make more, make less, or make the same in a different time frame. Scenario: give participants decision trees to follow and give them feedback on the consequences of their decisions. Interactive: using Q&As and other documentation, these simulations ask learners to respond to particular information that is presented during a scenario. Manual: includes board games and other methods that simulate certain conditions so learners see progressions and connections without the involvement of technology. Nielsen Business Media, Inc.
  • Chapter Seven p. 120

Day2 Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Day 2
    • What makes a game educational?
    • Types of Games/Simulations/Activities
    • What makes a good game/simulation/activity?
    • The Role of the Game Designer
    • Setting Player Experience Goals
  • 2. Why play games?
      • “ Games require players to construct hypotheses, solve problems, develop strategies, learn the rules of the in-game world through trial and error.”
      • “ Gamers must be able to juggle several different tasks, evaluate risks and make quick decisions--an ideal form of preparation for the workplace of the 21st century...”
    • The Economist, August 4, 2005
  • 3. What Makes a Game Educational?
    • It has an educationally-accessible context (historical, contemporary, hard science-fiction)
    • Success depends on intelligent choices and decisions (not twitch)
    • Failure exists and teaches when it happens. It is possible to lose
    • The tutorial is crystal clear, and checks for understanding
    • There are multiple victory conditions
    • The feedback model is short - students can quickly see how a decision effects a larger whole picture
    • The game becomes increasingly challenging and difficult
    • Adapted from Bill MacKenty at http://www.mackenty.org/index.php/site/comments/evaluting_educational_potential_in_a_cots_game/
  • 4. Game Play Supports the Following Skill Development:
    • communication
    • vocabulary
    • strategic thinking
    • application of numbers
    • planning
    • decision-making
    • multi-tasking (e-juggling)
    • hand/feet-eye coordination
  • 5. Types of Games and Simulations
    • Numeric: give participants certain parameters (budgets, number of units, costs, etc.) and ask them to make decisions based on them.
    • Scenario: give participants decision trees to follow and give them feedback on the consequences of their decisions.
    • Interactive: using Q&As and other documentation, these simulations ask learners to respond to particular information that is presented during a scenario.
    • Manual: includes board games and other methods that simulate certain conditions so learners see progressions and connections without the involvement of technology.
    • Nielsen Business Media, Inc.
  • 6.
    • Well-designed serious games "teach by stimulating the imagination, sparking curiosity, fostering discussion and encouraging a spirit of competitive exploration across a variety of domains.”
    • Virtual Heroes CEO Jerry Heneghan.
    What Games Teach Us
  • 7. Why Play Games and Sims for Learning?
    • practice already-acquired knowledge and skills;
    • identify gaps or weaknesses in knowledge or skills;
    • serve as a summary activity or review;
    • develop new relationships among concepts or principles
    • (Gredler, 2004).
  • 8. Some Questions to Ask When Evaluating Games
        • How compelling or engaging was the experience?
        • How comfortable did you feel with the game controls
        • Did you feel you were playing or learning?
        • Did the graphic quality help or hinder the experience?
        • What kind of instructional design could you observe in the game?
        • Did you choose to continue on to the next level or stage when you had the opportunity?
        • http://www.bristol.ac.uk/education/research/networks/mobile/events/iaswshp6notes/assessinglearning
  • 9. Digital Games and Sims for Learning: A Few Examples
    • Math, Science, Social Studies, Business, Health and so much more!
  • 10. Role of the Game Designer
    • Advocate for the player
    • Use playtesters (critical friend)
    • Have passions and skills
        • Communication
        • Teamwork
        • Process
        • Inspiration
        • Creativity
        • Become a better player
  • 11. Responsibility of the Game Designer
    • Importance of “Backwards Design” – knowing what you want to accomplish before you begin.
    • Importance of focusing on the teaching above the game/simulation
  • 12. Player Experience Goals
    • Goals that the game designer sets for the type of experience players will have during the game.
    • Descriptions of the interesting and unique situations you hope players will find themselves
    • Learning how to set player experience goals means getting inside the heads of the players
  • 13. Elements of a Successful Game
    • Preparation
    • A sense of space
    • A solid core mechanic
    • A range of challenges
    • A range of abilities required to solve the encounter
    • Skill required in using the abilities
  • 14. What Type of Player are You?
    • The Competitor : plays to win
    • The Explorer : plays for adventure
    • The Collector : plays to accumulate resources
    • The Achiever : plays to advance
    • The Joker : plays for fun
    • The Artist : plays for the creativity and design
    • The Director : plays to be in charge
    • The Storyteller : plays for the imagination and fantasy
    • The Performer : plays to showoff
    • The Craftsman : plays to construct