&quot;The Black Death&quot;<br />The 14th Century Bubonic Plague<br />Jessica Fett<br />EDU 290 – T/TH 12:30<br />
Spread of the Plague<br /><ul><li>1347 – 1353
The rat flea carried the virus
The fleas were carried as parasites on rats</li></ul>Wikipedia. “SEM of a flea.” Photo. Wikipedia.com28 Aug. 2005. 29 Sep....
Click Below for an Interactive Map<br />http://www.wadsworth.com/history_d/templates/student_resources/0534600069_spielvog...
Spread of the Plague<br /><ul><li>Originated: China/Inner Asia
Kipchak Army catapulted infected bodies at enemies
Disease spread along silk trade routes
Delivered to Western Europe through Mediterranean Sea Port</li></li></ul><li>Believed Causes<br /><ul><li>God was punishin...
Created by the devil
Cities state of hygiene
Jewish racism accusations
Anti-semitism</li></li></ul><li>Infection& Death Statistics<br /><ul><li>Various parts of Europe
 2/3 or ¾ of population
¼ total European population
25,000,000
Bubonic Plague killed      	50-60% of victims</li></ul>Wellcome Library, “Human bones and skulls in a brick-built pit,” vi...
Population Drop DuringThe Black Death<br />Year<br />Population in Millions<br />
Reactions<br />Flee – leave town<br />Let-Loose – lived for the moment<br />Blame – accused others<br />Cure – try to reas...
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Black Death PowerPoint Part 1

  1. 1. &quot;The Black Death&quot;<br />The 14th Century Bubonic Plague<br />Jessica Fett<br />EDU 290 – T/TH 12:30<br />
  2. 2. Spread of the Plague<br /><ul><li>1347 – 1353
  3. 3. The rat flea carried the virus
  4. 4. The fleas were carried as parasites on rats</li></ul>Wikipedia. “SEM of a flea.” Photo. Wikipedia.com28 Aug. 2005. 29 Sep. 2009 &lt;http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rat_flea&gt;<br />
  5. 5. Click Below for an Interactive Map<br />http://www.wadsworth.com/history_d/templates/student_resources/0534600069_spielvogel/InteractiveMaps/swfs/map11_1.html<br />Andy85719, “Bubonic Plague –en” May 31, 2008 via Wikimedia Commons, Creative Commons PD-Art.<br />
  6. 6. Spread of the Plague<br /><ul><li>Originated: China/Inner Asia
  7. 7. Kipchak Army catapulted infected bodies at enemies
  8. 8. Disease spread along silk trade routes
  9. 9. Delivered to Western Europe through Mediterranean Sea Port</li></li></ul><li>Believed Causes<br /><ul><li>God was punishing humanity for sins
  10. 10. Created by the devil
  11. 11. Cities state of hygiene
  12. 12. Jewish racism accusations
  13. 13. Anti-semitism</li></li></ul><li>Infection& Death Statistics<br /><ul><li>Various parts of Europe
  14. 14. 2/3 or ¾ of population
  15. 15. ¼ total European population
  16. 16. 25,000,000
  17. 17. Bubonic Plague killed 50-60% of victims</li></ul>Wellcome Library, “Human bones and skulls in a brick-built pit,” via Wellcome Library, Creative Commons by-nc.<br />Population in Millions<br />
  18. 18. Population Drop DuringThe Black Death<br />Year<br />Population in Millions<br />
  19. 19. Reactions<br />Flee – leave town<br />Let-Loose – lived for the moment<br />Blame – accused others<br />Cure – try to reason out the plague<br />Pray – for forgiveness <br />Quarantine – isolate themselves and others<br />
  20. 20. Reactions<br /><ul><li>Psychological:
  21. 21. Living for the moment
  22. 22. “Eat, drink, and be merry, for tomorrow you may die.”
  23. 23. Giovanni Boccaccio
  24. 24. Decameron
  25. 25. Religious:
  26. 26. Flagellants</li></ul>Paul Fredericq, “The flagellants at Doornik in 1349” Jul 13, 2007<br /> via Wikimedia Commons, Creative Commons PD-Art.<br />
  27. 27. Economical Consequences<br /><ul><li>Extreme price increases
  28. 28. High demand for workers
  29. 29. Wage increases
  30. 30. Even peasants
  31. 31. Breakdown of Manorialism</li></ul>Clipart from Microsoft<br />
  32. 32. Social Consequences<br /><ul><li>Breakdown of Manorialism
  33. 33. Peasant Uprisings
  34. 34. Jacquerie 1358
  35. 35. Peasant’s Revolt of 1381
  36. 36. Weakening of the landlords
  37. 37. City Revolts
  38. 38. Ciompi</li></ul>Inconnu, Jacquerie repression, Dec 24, 2007 <br /> via Wikimedia Commons, PD-Art.<br />
  39. 39. Religious Consequences<br />&quot;God is deaf now-a-days and deigneth not hear us, And prayers have no power the Plague to stay.”<br />— Piers Plowman<br /><ul><li>Decline of Church power
  40. 40. Lack of explanation for the plague
  41. 41. Decline in prayer and faith
  42. 42. Praying and God could not end the deaths
  43. 43. Anti-Semitism began after the Black Death</li></li></ul><li>Scapegoats<br /><ul><li>Anti-Semitism uprising
  44. 44. Jewish people wrongly blamed
  45. 45. Accused of well poisonings
  46. 46. Slaughter of Jewish communities
  47. 47. Protection for Jews in Poland</li></ul>Uhuru1701, “Stars of David, Vol. Two.” Feb 15, 2008 via Flicker, Creative Commons Attribution.<br />
  48. 48. Impact on the Arts<br /><ul><li>Obsession with death
  49. 49. Everyday situations impacted by death
  50. 50. Commissioned works of art
  51. 51. Sculptures and paintings
  52. 52. Realism
  53. 53. Showed realistic deaths</li></ul>Arnold BöcklinThe Plague<br />Arnold Bocklin, “The Plague (1898)” Nov 27, 2007 via Wikimedia<br /> Commons, Creative Commons PD-Art.<br />
  54. 54. Danse Macabre&apos;<br />“Dance of Death”<br /><ul><li>Woodcuts by Hans Holbein the Younger
  55. 55. Commissioned artwork for churches
  56. 56. Showed that death was not bias of status
  57. 57. Females
  58. 58. Males
  59. 59. Clergy
  60. 60. Kings
  61. 61. Peasants
  62. 62. Babies</li></li></ul><li>Hans Holbein the Younger<br />The Empress<br />The Pope<br />The Peddler<br />The Old Man <br />The Knight<br />The Abbess<br />Woodcut Examples<br />See citations at end of presentation<br />
  63. 63. Recap<br /><ul><li> The plague came on the trade routes
  64. 64. Affected Europe in phases
  65. 65. Devastated population
  66. 66. Caused economic, religious, </li></ul> and social changes<br /><ul><li> Impacted the arts</li></li></ul><li>Information Citations<br />Brown University. (n.d.). Decameron Web. Retrieved October 4, 2009, from www.brown.edu/Departments/Italian_Studies/dweb/ plague/ index.shtml<br />Butler, C. (2007). The Black Death and its Impacts. Retrieved October 4, 2009, from http://www.flowofhistory.com/units/west/10/ FC71 <br />Knox, E.L.S. (n.d.). The Middle Ages The Black Death. Retrieved October 4, 2009, from http://www.boisestate.edu/ courses/westciv/plague/<br />Spielvogel, J. J. (2006). Western Civilization. Belmont, CA: Thomson Higher Education. <br />
  67. 67. Woodcut Citations<br />Holbein, Hans. The Empress. N.d. The Dance of Death . Martin Hagstrøm , n.d. Web. 5 Oct. 2009. &lt;http://www.dodedans.com/Eholbein10.htm&gt;. <br />Holbein, Hans. The Peddler. N.d. The Dance of Death. Martin Hagstrøm , n.d. Web. 5 Oct. 2009. &lt;http://www.dodedans.com/Eholbein37.htm&gt;.<br />Holbein, Hans. The Knight. N.d. The Dance of Death. Martin Hagstrøm , n.d. Web. 5 Oct. 2009. &lt;http://www.dodedans.com/Eholbein31.htm&gt;.<br />Holbein, Hans. The Pope. N.d. The Dance of Death. Martin Hagstrøm , n.d. Web 5 Oct. 2009. &lt;http://www.dodedans.com/Eholbein06.htm&gt;.<br />Holbein, Hans. The Old Man. N.d. The Dance of Death. Martin Hagstrøm , n.d. Web. 5 Oct. 2009. &lt;http://www.dodedans.com/Eholbein33.htm&gt;.<br />Holbein, Hans. The Abbess. N.d. The Dance of Death. Martin Hagstrøm , n.d. Web. 5 Oct. 2009. &lt;http://www.dodedans.com/Eholbein15.htm&gt;.<br />
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