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Black Death PowerPoint Part 1

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  • 1. "The Black Death"
    The 14th Century Bubonic Plague
    Jessica Fett
    EDU 290 – T/TH 12:30
  • 2. Spread of the Plague
    • 1347 – 1353
    • 3. The rat flea carried the virus
    • 4. The fleas were carried as parasites on rats
    Wikipedia. “SEM of a flea.” Photo. Wikipedia.com28 Aug. 2005. 29 Sep. 2009 <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rat_flea>
  • 5. Click Below for an Interactive Map
    http://www.wadsworth.com/history_d/templates/student_resources/0534600069_spielvogel/InteractiveMaps/swfs/map11_1.html
    Andy85719, “Bubonic Plague –en” May 31, 2008 via Wikimedia Commons, Creative Commons PD-Art.
  • 6. Spread of the Plague
    • Originated: China/Inner Asia
    • 7. Kipchak Army catapulted infected bodies at enemies
    • 8. Disease spread along silk trade routes
    • 9. Delivered to Western Europe through Mediterranean Sea Port
  • Believed Causes
    • God was punishing humanity for sins
    • 10. Created by the devil
    • 11. Cities state of hygiene
    • 12. Jewish racism accusations
    • 13. Anti-semitism
  • Infection& Death Statistics
    • Various parts of Europe
    • 14. 2/3 or ¾ of population
    • 15. ¼ total European population
    • 16. 25,000,000
    • 17. Bubonic Plague killed 50-60% of victims
    Wellcome Library, “Human bones and skulls in a brick-built pit,” via Wellcome Library, Creative Commons by-nc.
    Population in Millions
  • 18. Population Drop DuringThe Black Death
    Year
    Population in Millions
  • 19. Reactions
    Flee – leave town
    Let-Loose – lived for the moment
    Blame – accused others
    Cure – try to reason out the plague
    Pray – for forgiveness
    Quarantine – isolate themselves and others
  • 20. Reactions
    • Psychological:
    • 21. Living for the moment
    • 22. “Eat, drink, and be merry, for tomorrow you may die.”
    • 23. Giovanni Boccaccio
    • 24. Decameron
    • 25. Religious:
    • 26. Flagellants
    Paul Fredericq, “The flagellants at Doornik in 1349” Jul 13, 2007
    via Wikimedia Commons, Creative Commons PD-Art.
  • 27. Economical Consequences
    • Extreme price increases
    • 28. High demand for workers
    • 29. Wage increases
    • 30. Even peasants
    • 31. Breakdown of Manorialism
    Clipart from Microsoft
  • 32. Social Consequences
    • Breakdown of Manorialism
    • 33. Peasant Uprisings
    • 34. Jacquerie 1358
    • 35. Peasant’s Revolt of 1381
    • 36. Weakening of the landlords
    • 37. City Revolts
    • 38. Ciompi
    Inconnu, Jacquerie repression, Dec 24, 2007
    via Wikimedia Commons, PD-Art.
  • 39. Religious Consequences
    "God is deaf now-a-days and deigneth not hear us, And prayers have no power the Plague to stay.”
    — Piers Plowman
    • Decline of Church power
    • 40. Lack of explanation for the plague
    • 41. Decline in prayer and faith
    • 42. Praying and God could not end the deaths
    • 43. Anti-Semitism began after the Black Death
  • Scapegoats
    • Anti-Semitism uprising
    • 44. Jewish people wrongly blamed
    • 45. Accused of well poisonings
    • 46. Slaughter of Jewish communities
    • 47. Protection for Jews in Poland
    Uhuru1701, “Stars of David, Vol. Two.” Feb 15, 2008 via Flicker, Creative Commons Attribution.
  • 48. Impact on the Arts
    • Obsession with death
    • 49. Everyday situations impacted by death
    • 50. Commissioned works of art
    • 51. Sculptures and paintings
    • 52. Realism
    • 53. Showed realistic deaths
    Arnold BöcklinThe Plague
    Arnold Bocklin, “The Plague (1898)” Nov 27, 2007 via Wikimedia
    Commons, Creative Commons PD-Art.
  • 54. Danse Macabre'
    “Dance of Death”
  • Hans Holbein the Younger
    The Empress
    The Pope
    The Peddler
    The Old Man
    The Knight
    The Abbess
    Woodcut Examples
    See citations at end of presentation
  • 63. Recap
    • The plague came on the trade routes
    • 64. Affected Europe in phases
    • 65. Devastated population
    • 66. Caused economic, religious,
    and social changes
    • Impacted the arts
  • Information Citations
    Brown University. (n.d.). Decameron Web. Retrieved October 4, 2009, from www.brown.edu/Departments/Italian_Studies/dweb/ plague/ index.shtml
    Butler, C. (2007). The Black Death and its Impacts. Retrieved October 4, 2009, from http://www.flowofhistory.com/units/west/10/ FC71
    Knox, E.L.S. (n.d.). The Middle Ages The Black Death. Retrieved October 4, 2009, from http://www.boisestate.edu/ courses/westciv/plague/
    Spielvogel, J. J. (2006). Western Civilization. Belmont, CA: Thomson Higher Education.
  • 67. Woodcut Citations
    Holbein, Hans. The Empress. N.d. The Dance of Death . Martin Hagstrøm , n.d. Web. 5 Oct. 2009. <http://www.dodedans.com/Eholbein10.htm>.
    Holbein, Hans. The Peddler. N.d. The Dance of Death. Martin Hagstrøm , n.d. Web. 5 Oct. 2009. <http://www.dodedans.com/Eholbein37.htm>.
    Holbein, Hans. The Knight. N.d. The Dance of Death. Martin Hagstrøm , n.d. Web. 5 Oct. 2009. <http://www.dodedans.com/Eholbein31.htm>.
    Holbein, Hans. The Pope. N.d. The Dance of Death. Martin Hagstrøm , n.d. Web 5 Oct. 2009. <http://www.dodedans.com/Eholbein06.htm>.
    Holbein, Hans. The Old Man. N.d. The Dance of Death. Martin Hagstrøm , n.d. Web. 5 Oct. 2009. <http://www.dodedans.com/Eholbein33.htm>.
    Holbein, Hans. The Abbess. N.d. The Dance of Death. Martin Hagstrøm , n.d. Web. 5 Oct. 2009. <http://www.dodedans.com/Eholbein15.htm>.