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Transcript

  • 1. Hi I’m Sam
    • I’m male
    • Nineteen Years of age
    • From Birmingham, West-Midlands United Kingdom
    • I’m training at the Royal Scottish Academy of Music and Drama
    • I need your help
    • But First you should use the next slide to introduce yourself …..
  • 2. Hi I ’m James
    • I’m male
    • Twenty three years of age
    • From a fracture in the space time continuum (Aberdeen)
    • I’m training at the Glasgow Metropolitan college in Professional catering.
  • 3. “ drama is not simply a subject but also a method, a learning tool …” Jonothan Neelands
    • I had help writing this manifesto. I showed the first slide in this presentation to James Wilson. I set a task for James Wilson to introduce himself, I used Dorothy Heathcotes Teacher-in-role method. “A drama teacher is not an outside director or observer but an active participant of the creative process.” (Heathcote)
    • I believe that to enable a creative atmosphere I should not always be seen to be leading, I use Heathcotes Registers;
    • The one who knows
    • W ould I lie to you
    • I have no idea
    • It’s no use asking me
    • T he suggestor of implications
    • T he interested listener
    • T he I ’ll get what you need
    • T he devil’s advocate
  • 4. I work using framings ….
    • This is taken from Heathcotes work, were there are roles the students she is working with can take as a framing device.
    • Participant
    • Guide
    • Agent
    • Authority
    • R ecorder
    • Press
    • Research
    • Critic
    • Artist
    • I use these frames and create others for different situations and scenarios . Functions within groups are really important, giving responsibility to the group and purpose. Giving decision making and the responsibilities and implication of decisions over to the group.
    • “ In drama young people are able to take satisfaction in creating credible and coherent alternative worlds and experiences through their own imaginative efforts. I n doing so, young people are realising and extending their ability to imagine new futures and alternatives, new problems and solutions, a world beyond the street corner.” (Neelands)
    • Categories, an old person, young person, homeless person, a trouble maker etc. Categories only trap a person in one place, a teacher tells another teacher that a child is a trouble maker, that child is categorised. Creating new, alternative scenarios for big questions and issues facing and effecting generations and how this could be changed is important. More importantly for my own applied performance pedagogy is the present, inquisitively exploring society through performance. People and there live’s. Be it working life, married life, school life the list goes on. Using framing to move away from the categories a person can be placed in, a place to explore a different role, a platform to look at society, culture, history and people and asking questions and putting them forward in performance to the people around them.”
  • 5. A task.
    • You are production assistants on a locally produced film, set within Glasgow city centre.
    • Your task is to find four different locations for filming to take place at, they need to fit the short description provided. Pictures need to be taken using the camera provided and numbered with the location number. This is so the director can decide which location will be suitable for the film.
    • The locations;
    • A dangerous place
    • A safe place
    • A high finance area
    • A secret place
  • 6.
    • In the task from the previous slide I have establish possibilities for framings, roles for participants to take on.
    • Production assistants
    • Photographer
    • L ocation scouts
    • T ime keepers (if this was a timed task)
    • And the possibilities for the group to think of framings they can create and take on themselves.
    • I have also used another of Heathcotes methods, Mantle of the expert.
    • “ Learning is facilitated if students are asked to think from within an imagined situation, taking decisions from a position of authority.” (Heathcote)
    • I have not just asked the participants to go out into Glasgow and look at different places with different feelings and atmospheres.
    • I use Mantle of the expert to carry on the purpose through the work, they are production assistants looking for locations for a local film. There is reason to the task and passes on a responsibility and authority of how to go about completing the task to the group, and a belief they can complete the task.
    • This links with the teacher-in-role I have assumed, I don’t know how to go about completing the task within my teacher-in-role, but I enable the group to find their own way. This is very important within my practise, to create a strong scenario and structure that the participants can explore and discover within. With goals that can be complete within the time that is set, letting there be a feeling of achievement when the group completes the goals and tasks.
  • 7. The pictures from the task.
    • A dangerous place
    • A safe place
    • A high finance area
    • A secret place
    1 2 3 4
  • 8.
    • Why did we choose the location we did for each title?
    • What stories could take place at these locations?
    • What characters could you find at these different locations?
  • 9. After completing the task, I asked why we had picked certain location to represent the titles we had being given. Evaluating and asking questions after a task and while a task is being completed is imperative, Jonothan Neelands calls this Poetic Action. It is a way of looking beyond the scenario and shifting from undertaking the task to looking and reflecting. “ It also opens up an alternative channel of communication which works at the level of symbolic interpretation and it can increase emotional involvement.” (Neelands) To allows for participants thoughts and emotions to become involved in a safe means, it can become the beginning of performance material. We have used this method while working with Third years from Barrhead High, asking why they don’t like Barrhead in certain places, why do they believe it isn’t safe after dark, what is there to do around Barrhead.
  • 10.
    • James believed the task to be real, after we completed the task I told James it was part of my manifesto. I explained the different methods I had used to construct the task and the lure around the task.
  • 11. “ If you’re not prepared to be wrong you’ll never come up with anything original.” (Ken Robinson) My own applied performance pedagogy is the present, inquisitively exploring society through performance. People and there live’s. Be it working life, married life, school life the list goes on. Using framing to move away from the categories a person can be placed in, a place to explore a different role, a platform to look at society, culture, history and people and asking questions and putting them forward in performance to the people around them.” (Sam Phillips) “ Creating a strong scenario and structure that the participants can explore and discover within. With goals that can be complete within the time that is set, letting there be a feeling of achievement when the group completes the goals and tasks.” (Sam Phillips) “ It also opens up an alternative channel of communication which works at the level of symbolic interpretation and it can increase emotional involvement.” (Neelands)