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SharePoint Development(Lesson 5)
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SharePoint Development(Lesson 5)

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SharePoint Development ...

SharePoint Development
=================
SharePoint Designer 2010 Overview
SP Designer New Feature
SharePoint Designer Security
Custom Master Page Design
Site Branding

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  • RibbonJust like the rest of the Microsoft Office suite.it makes you Really productive and efficient! The Summary Pages show you the settings and summary of an object that you are currently viewing.For example, if you are focused on a list, it will show you the name, description, views, forms etc for the list. The Quick Launch navigation on the side gives you a quick way to get to different categories of objects within the site (lists, workflows, site pages etc.). Overall, it’s easier to navigate a SharePoint site using this new user experience.
  • The reason for doing this in SPD is that it’s much faster and efficient than going to the web browser and waiting for each page to load after clicking on a link to.
  • Until SharePoint 2007, you had to go through the browser to configure the security for your site. It didn’t matter what your credentials were. You could be the SharePoint server admin, but still you had to resort through using the browser. Not anymore! You can configure security directly in SPD now. Creating new SharePoint groups, associating them to the appropriate permission levels and adding users to the groups is all built into the environment now.
  • It is basically how you are telling SharePoint what types of content you will be generating in your environment.
  • In SharePoint 2007, we had List View web parts (LVWP) to show our list or library content in a page on the site. They worked fine, however, they were not very extensible. Meaning, if you wanted to manipulate their look and feel, you could only get as far as using the pre-built styles and layouts either through the browser or through SPD. On the other hand, we had the XSLT Data View web part (DVWP) which you could configure visually using only SharePoint Designer.
  • More often than not, you will need to display data on SharePoint pages that’s coming from outside of SharePoint. SPD provides an easy to use interface to make a connection to a data source that you have access to. It’s a fairly simple wizard driven process to connect to external data sources such as databases, xml files, server side scripts (including RSS feeds), and web services (also included in this release is the support for connecting to REST web services). The best part about this functionality is that you can link the data sources together and then show a unified view of the data. So for example, let’s say you’re in a retail business… your category information could be in a xml file, while your subcategories could be accessible through a vendor’s web service and then your actual products information is in your database. You can first create the connections to your data sources and then connect all of this information together to display a combined view of the data for your users. End users don’t need to know where the actual data is coming from as long as it all just works together ‘automagically’.
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SharePoint Development(Lesson 5) SharePoint Development(Lesson 5) Presentation Transcript

  • MJ FerdousSharePoint ArchitectFounder, SharePoint Expert Community
  • SharePoint Development– SharePoint Designer 2010 Overview– SP Designer New Feature– SharePoint Designer Security– Custom Master Page Design– Site Branding
  • SharePoint Designer 2010 Overview• SharePoint Designer is basically for the people who need to do branding or styling in SharePoint.• While it’s true that SPD is really good at letting you apply style sheets to your sites, modify existing SharePoint themes, alter or create new Master Pages etc, this is only one part of its functionality.• Can also use SPD for all the non-branding reasons. Use it to create end to end solutions on top of SharePoint using functionality such as the Data View web part, Workflow designer, manipulating web part zones, creating page layouts etc.
  • SP Designer New Feature1. New User Experience with Summary Pages, Ribbon and Quick Launch navigation2. Creating SharePoint Content structure3. Configure Site Security4. Create Content Types and attach to Lists directly5. Create Site Assets for your site6. Use XSLT List View web parts to show dynamic views of your data7. Connect to Data Sources outside of SharePoint8. Create External Content Types using Business Connectivity Services9. Create Powerful Reusable Workflows10. Restrict SharePoint Designer usage as needed
  • SP Designer New Feature 1. New User Experience with Summary Pages, Ribbon and Quick Launch navigation
  • SP Designer New Feature 2. Creating SharePoint Content structure You can do all of this in the browser or you can do it in SPD. The web browser is much slower than using the SPD client application. That’s a fact! let’s say, change the title and description of the site
  • SP Designer New Feature3. Configure Site Security: You can configure security directly in SPD now. • Creating new SharePoint groups, • Associating them to the appropriate permission levels and • Adding users to the groups is all built into the environment now.
  • SP Designer New Feature 3. Configure Site Security: You can configure security directly in SPD now
  • SP Designer New Feature 4. Create Content Types and attach to Lists directly
  • SP Designer New Feature5. Create Site Assets for your site – There is a new type of library now included in SharePoint 2010 called Site Assets. – The objective of this library is to store the files that are used as resources for the site such as style sheets, JavaScript files, xml files and even images which need to be served up on site pages. – You can create these resource files in site assets library directly through SPD. – Since SPD supports intellisense for JavaScript, style sheets, and also xml, it is a much more conducive environment in which to author these files.
  • SP Designer New Feature 6. Use XSLT List View web parts to show dynamic views of your data
  • SP Designer New Feature 7. Connect to Data Sources outside of SharePoint
  • SP Designer New Feature7. Connect to Data Sources outside of SharePoint• More often than not, you will need to display data on SharePoint pages that’s coming from outside of SharePoint.• SPD provides an easy to use interface to make a connection to a data source that you have access to.• It’s a fairly simple wizard driven process to connect to external data sources such as databases, xml files, server side scripts (including RSS feeds), and web services (also included in this release is the support for connecting to REST web services).• The best part about this functionality is that you can link the data sources together and then show a unified view of the data. So for example, let’s say you’re in a retail business… your category information could be in a xml file, while your subcategories could be accessible through a vendor’s web service and then your actual products information is in your database.• You can first create the connections to your data sources and then connect all of this information together to display a combined view of the data for your users.• End users don’t need to know where the actual data is coming from as long as it all just works together ‘automagically’.
  • SP Designer New Feature8. Create External Content Types using Business Connectivity Services – SharePoint 2007 introduced a new functionality called Business Data Catalog [renamed Business Connectivity Services(BCS) Now at SP2010] – The idea behind this functionality is to expose Line of Business data from your back end services (such as SAP, custom databases etc.) to business user/analysts so they can use them within SharePoint. – Each piece of information can be exposed as an External Content Type (ECT) using SharePoint Designer – Then a business user/analyst can use SharePoint through the web browser to make an External List which uses this ECT. – The result will be that they have a list now showing information straight from the Customers table in the database
  • SP Designer New Feature9. Create Powerful Reusable Workflows• With SharePoint Designer 2010, you can create reusable workflows! These workflows can then be attached to lists, libraries or even content types.• Not only that, but you can even package your workflows as a .wsp (solution file) and extend it further using Visual Studio!• In addition to the reusable workflows, you can also create workflows which are specific to a site so there is no need to attach to a list or library at all (called Site Workflows).• Also mention that workflows can now be modeled in Visio 2010 and then exported to SharePoint Designer.• There are so many improvements in SPD workflows that it will take a separate blog post to dig into it all.
  • SharePoint Designer SecurityRestricting SharePoint Uses as needed1. SharePoint Designer 2010 is a powerful application.2. The usage of this application can be controlled at the Web Application and at the Site Collection level. A Site Collection admin, for example, can decide if she wants her Site admins to be able to utilize SPD at all. Go to -> Site Action  Site Settings  Site Collection Administration to get SharePoint Designer Security3. Not just that, but various functions within SPD can also be restricted. An example of that is creation and management of Master Pages and Page Layouts. Another facet that can be restricted is customization of pages and detaching them from the site definition.
  • Custom Master Page Design
  • Custom Master Page Design• Leave Default Master Pages in Peace and copy another one• Create a Custom CSS to Add Branding• To create a new css file, right click on the Style Library and select New > CSS from menu.• we need to add a link to our custom CSS file: • <link href=”/Style%20Library/myCustom.css” rel=”stylesheet” type=”text/css” />• Now modify the s4-workspace area so it will read our css file properly:• Find the line: • <div id=”s4-workspace”> and replace it with: <DIV id=”s4-workspace” class=”s4-nosetwidth”>
  • Custom Master Page Design
  • Others way to add CSS references in Master Pages• Here are some of the most common ways to reference your custom CSS for SharePoint 2010. One key change over 2007 is the ability to specify After=”corev4.css” in the CssRegistration to make sure your custom CSS is referenced after the OOTB corev4.css file. <SharePoint:CssLink runat="server" Version="4"/> Note: Default OOTB Output Order: <link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="/_layouts/1033/styles/Themable/corev4.css"/> <SharePoint:Theme runat="server"/> Note: If a theme is enabled Output Order: <link rel=”stylesheet” type=”text/css” href=”/_themes/[UniqueCounter#]/corev4- [u=UniqueHex#].css?ctag=[UniqueCounter#]”/>
  • CSS references in Master Pages<SharePoint:CssRegistration name=”customfolder/samplecustom.css” runat=”server”/>Note: Alternate CSS on Server but comes before corev4.cssOutput Order:<link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="/_layouts/1033/styles/customfolder/samplecustom.css"/><link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="/_layouts/1033/styles/Themable/corev4.css"/><SharePoint:CssRegistration name=”customfolder/samplecustom.css” After=”corev4.css” runat=”server”/>Note: Alternate CSS on Server and comes after corev4.css.Output Order:<link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="/_layouts/1033/styles/Themable/corev4.css"/><link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="/_layouts/1033/styles/customfolder/samplecustom.css"/><SharePoint:CssRegistration name="<% $SPUrl:~sitecollection/Style Library/samplecustom.css %>"After="corev4.css" runat="server"/>Note: Alternate CSS In SharePoint Database for sites without publishing enabledOutput Order:<link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="/_layouts/1033/styles/Themable/corev4.css"/><link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="/Style%20Library/emc_2010_custom.css"/><SharePoint:CssRegistration name="<% $SPUrl:~sitecollection/Style Library/~language/Themable/CoreStyles/samplecustom.css %>" After="corev4.css" runat="server"/>Note: Alternate CSS In SharePoint Database for sites with publishing enabledOutput Order:<link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="/_layouts/1033/styles/Themable/corev4.css"/><link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="/[sitename]/Style%20Library/en-US/Themable/Core%20Styles/emc_2010_custom.css"/>