Nutrients

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These are the compounds that make food healing.
We put the vegetable fibers in them, because the body does not organize them.
Among other metrics, in the tables you will see the label “mg”, which represents micrograms (a microgram is a thousandth of a milligram). There is also an IU, international unit.

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Nutrients

  1. 1. Where are the nutrients?In the tables below you will find other rich sources of thefollowing substances:-mikronutrients (such as monounsaturated fats and omega 3fatty acids),-mikronutrients (such as vitamins and minerals),-phytochemicals (such as beta-carotene and isoflavones). These are the compounds that make food healing. We put the vegetable fibers in them, because the body does not organize them.Among other metrics, in the tables you will see the label “mg”, which represents micrograms(a microgram is a thousandth of a milligram). There is also an IU, international unit. Whenused in addition to some vitamins – especially those that come in several forms – it means aquantity of vitamins necessary to achieve a certain biological effect. To convert milligrams ofvitamin E in the same amount of alpha-tocopherol (a natural form of Vitamin E) expressed inIU, zou have to multiply the number of milligrams of 1,5 (or 2,2 to get the amount ofsynthetic vitamin E expressed in IU). To convert IU of vitamin E in milligrams of naturalvitamin E, zou have to multiply the number of IU of 0,67 (or 0,45 for synthetic vitamin E).It is important to note that the iron from plant foods is difficult to absorb, even when it isentered in the same amount as iron from other sources. Because the oysters, for example,are better source of iron than raisins.
  2. 2. Nutrient ingredient / phytochemical Foodstuff Amount Beans , tinned (cup of 250 ml ) 16 gDIETARY FIBER Raspberries , frozen (cup of 250 ml ) 15 g Wheat flour, whole grains (cup of 250 ml ) 14 g Dates, chopped (cup of 250 ml ) 14 g Prunes, without bones (cup of 250 ml ) 13 g Baked beans, tinned (cup of 250 ml ) 12 g Soybeans, mature, cooked (cup of 250 ml ) 12 g Peas, frozen, cooked (cup of 250 ml ) 12 g Mixed vegetables, frozen, cooked (cup of 250 ml ) 12 g Dried apricots (cup of 250 ml ) 10 g Spaniard, chopped, cooked (cup of 250 ml ) 10 g Muesli (cup of 250 ml ) 8g Lentils, cooked (cup of 250 ml ) 7g Raspberries, fresh (cup of 250 ml ) 7g Pumpkin, cooked (cup of 250 ml ) 6g Carrots, cooked (cup of 250 ml ) 6g Barley, cooked (cup of 250 ml ) 5g
  3. 3. VEGETABLE FIBERS Beans, canned (cup of 250 ml) 16 g Raspberries, frozen (cup of 250 15 g ml) Wheat flour, (cup of 250 ml) 14 g Pitted prunes (cup of 250 ml) 13 g Cereals (cup of 250 ml) 13 g Bulgur, cooked and soaked (cup 13 g of 250 ml) Peas, frozen, cooked (cup of 250 12 g ml) Mix vegetables, frozen, cooked 12 g (cup of 250 ml) Dried apricots (cup of 250 ml) 10 g Spinach, chopped, cooked (cup 10 g of 250 ml) Muesli (cup of 250 ml) 8g Raspberries (cup of 250 ml) 7g Soybeans, green, cooked (cup of 7g 250 ml) Brussels sprouts, cooked (cup of 7g 250 ml) Spaghetti, cooked (cup of 250 7g ml) Cooked pumpkin (cup of 250 ml) 6g Cooked carrots (cup of 250 ml) 6g Dried raisins (cup of 250 ml) 6g Pear or apple, with peel, raw 5g (medium) Potatoes, cooked in shell (small) 4g Corn flour (cup of 250 ml) 3g Bread, slice 2g
  4. 4. CALCIUM Cheese with less than 20% of 400 mg milk fat (50 g) Sardines with bones (100g) 370 mg Milk (cup of 250 ml) 350 mg Yogurt, fruit with law milk fat 340 mg (200 ml) Tofu (100 g) 320 mg Salmon, canned, with bones and 310 mg fluid (100 g) Milk with 1% milk fat (cup of 250 290 mg ml) Soybeans, green, cooked (cup of 260 mg 250 ml) Almonds, raw (half of the cup of 175 mg 250 ml) Soybeans, mature, cooked (cup 130 mg of 250 ml) Spinach, cooked (cup of 250 ml) 120 mgPOTASSIUM Dried raisins or dried plums (cup 1.300 mg of 250 ml) Spinach, cooked (cup of 250 ml) 1.120 mg Potatoes roasted un the shell 1.020 mg Avocado (medium) 1.000 mg Pumpkin, cooked (cup of 250 ml) 770 mg Apple (small) 750 mg Broccoli, chopped (cup of 250 470 mg ml) Tomatoes, mashed or puree, 430 mg canned (cup of 250 ml) Melon, chopped into cubes (cup 400 mg of 250 ml)
  5. 5. VITAMIN C Red pepper, chopped (cup of 300 mg 250 ml) Papaya 187 mg Green pepper, chopped (cup of 140 mg 250 ml) Orange juice from shop (cup of 120 mg 250 ml) Cranberry juice (cup of 250 ml) 107 mg Brussels sprouts, cooked (cup of 98 mg 250 ml) Broccoli, chopped, cooked (cup 90 mg of 250 ml) Pressed orange juice (cup of 250 85 mg ml) Melon, chopped (cup of 250 ml) 65 mg Strawberries (cup of 250 ml) 64 mg Hot pepper, green 57 mg Orange (medium) 52 mg Kiwi (medium) 50 mg Cabbage, cooked (cup of 250 ml) 37 mg Pineapple juice (cup of 250 ml) 30 mg Pineapple, sliced (cup of 250 ml) 28 mgClick here for more information and tables

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