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Karabeyeser f 201013150 everyone can talk about networks
Karabeyeser f 201013150 everyone can talk about networks
Karabeyeser f 201013150 everyone can talk about networks
Karabeyeser f 201013150 everyone can talk about networks
Karabeyeser f 201013150 everyone can talk about networks
Karabeyeser f 201013150 everyone can talk about networks
Karabeyeser f 201013150 everyone can talk about networks
Karabeyeser f 201013150 everyone can talk about networks
Karabeyeser f 201013150 everyone can talk about networks
Karabeyeser f 201013150 everyone can talk about networks
Karabeyeser f 201013150 everyone can talk about networks
Karabeyeser f 201013150 everyone can talk about networks
Karabeyeser f 201013150 everyone can talk about networks
Karabeyeser f 201013150 everyone can talk about networks
Karabeyeser f 201013150 everyone can talk about networks
Karabeyeser f 201013150 everyone can talk about networks
Karabeyeser f 201013150 everyone can talk about networks
Karabeyeser f 201013150 everyone can talk about networks
Karabeyeser f 201013150 everyone can talk about networks
Karabeyeser f 201013150 everyone can talk about networks
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Karabeyeser f 201013150 everyone can talk about networks

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  • Points to make:These tools provide access to content created by their peers, and allows them to create and upload their own content. Collections of content are tagged and catalogued, peer reviewed and rated. Flickr and Youtube provide the space for individuals to share their collection of photos and videos, created by them. These collections of content are tagged, catalogued, peer reviewed and rated.Facebook and the like have become more and the locus of social networking. Thousands and thousands of individual profiles, featuring interests, skills, hobbies, these personal homepages allow blogging, messaging forwarded to email, connecting to friends, and friends of friends, and friends of friends of friends. Once a college-only space, Facebook has now expanded out into the land of professionals, joining LinkedIn as a popular tools for growing your professional connections.Bungie.net tracks performance of gamers and ranks them according to their stats. Players can go to the website and find the best player for a given scenario, message them, and arrange for a game session.Virtual worlds such as Second Life provide virtual venues for events of all sorts; educational, spiritual, political, and economic. The immersive nature of virtual worlds create the sense of ‘being there’ in these shared experiences. The toolset embedded here allows for instant communication (voice or text), group formation, object creation and sharing, live performances, etc.These tools provide access to content created by their peers, and allows them to create and upload their own content. Collections of content are tagged and catalogued, peer reviewed and rated. Flickr and Youtube provide the space for individuals to share their collection of photos and videos, created by them. These collections of content are tagged, catalogued, peer reviewed and rated.Facebook and the like have become more and the locus of social networking. Thousands and thousands of individual profiles, featuring interests, skills, hobbies, these personal homepages allow blogging, messaging forwarded to email, connecting to friends, and friends of friends, and friends of friends of friends. Once a college-only space, Facebook has now expanded out into the land of professionals, joining LinkedIn as a popular tools for growing your professional connections.Bungie.net tracks performance of gamers and ranks them according to their stats. Players can go to the website and find the best player for a given scenario, message them, and arrange for a game session.Virtual worlds such as Second Life provide virtual venues for events of all sorts; educational, spiritual, political, and economic. The immersive nature of virtual worlds create the sense of ‘being there’ in these shared experiences. The toolset embedded here allows for instant communication (voice or text), group formation, object creation and sharing, live performances, etc.These tools provide connections to from people to people, and people to information. Affinity groups are formed, and membership is suggested to you, based on your profile. You join three groups – one on Instructional Design, one on New Technologies, and one on Fly Fishing. I am now connected to these groups, and receive updates on events, photos, resources, etc. I contribute to those groups, too, by making a post now and then, and offering links to interesting articles. I receive a few friend requests from members of those groups – some are people I knew before, some have professional interests in common, and some noticed that we went to the same university. My ‘friend’ list grows. Each of those friends has their own network…
  • Points to make:These tools provide access to content created by their peers, and allows them to create and upload their own content. Collections of content are tagged and catalogued, peer reviewed and rated. Flickr and Youtube provide the space for individuals to share their collection of photos and videos, created by them. These collections of content are tagged, catalogued, peer reviewed and rated.Facebook and the like have become more and the locus of social networking. Thousands and thousands of individual profiles, featuring interests, skills, hobbies, these personal homepages allow blogging, messaging forwarded to email, connecting to friends, and friends of friends, and friends of friends of friends. Once a college-only space, Facebook has now expanded out into the land of professionals, joining LinkedIn as a popular tools for growing your professional connections.Bungie.net tracks performance of gamers and ranks them according to their stats. Players can go to the website and find the best player for a given scenario, message them, and arrange for a game session.Virtual worlds such as Second Life provide virtual venues for events of all sorts; educational, spiritual, political, and economic. The immersive nature of virtual worlds create the sense of ‘being there’ in these shared experiences. The toolset embedded here allows for instant communication (voice or text), group formation, object creation and sharing, live performances, etc.These tools provide access to content created by their peers, and allows them to create and upload their own content. Collections of content are tagged and catalogued, peer reviewed and rated. Flickr and Youtube provide the space for individuals to share their collection of photos and videos, created by them. These collections of content are tagged, catalogued, peer reviewed and rated.Facebook and the like have become more and the locus of social networking. Thousands and thousands of individual profiles, featuring interests, skills, hobbies, these personal homepages allow blogging, messaging forwarded to email, connecting to friends, and friends of friends, and friends of friends of friends. Once a college-only space, Facebook has now expanded out into the land of professionals, joining LinkedIn as a popular tools for growing your professional connections.Bungie.net tracks performance of gamers and ranks them according to their stats. Players can go to the website and find the best player for a given scenario, message them, and arrange for a game session.Virtual worlds such as Second Life provide virtual venues for events of all sorts; educational, spiritual, political, and economic. The immersive nature of virtual worlds create the sense of ‘being there’ in these shared experiences. The toolset embedded here allows for instant communication (voice or text), group formation, object creation and sharing, live performances, etc.These tools provide connections to from people to people, and people to information. Affinity groups are formed, and membership is suggested to you, based on your profile. You join three groups – one on Instructional Design, one on New Technologies, and one on Fly Fishing. I am now connected to these groups, and receive updates on events, photos, resources, etc. I contribute to those groups, too, by making a post now and then, and offering links to interesting articles. I receive a few friend requests from members of those groups – some are people I knew before, some have professional interests in common, and some noticed that we went to the same university. My ‘friend’ list grows. Each of those friends has their own network…
  • http://www.ux-sa.com/2007/09/structural-holes-and-online-social.htmlBut avoid becoming a bottleneck!
  • Speaker notes:I like put things into perspective. The theme of today’s Corporate Relations event is that of seeing opportunities in the midst of the financial crisis and I think that what is interesting and relevant here is that several economic historians had actually predicted the crisis that we are experiencing now. I don’t have time to go into all the details, but what we are seeing is a pattern repeating itself. As in the late 18th and 19th Centuries there was a technological innovation that led to a period first of transformation as the innovation began to be diffused, then a period of rationalization leading to an imbalance, and then to a financial crisis coming around 40 years after the innovation. However, in the past, these financial crises have then led to periods of great economic development – industrial revolutions, in which industry profitability has been restored through a redistribution of the value-added between capital and labor. But more importantly, these crises filtered out those organizations that could not adapt and change to stay competitive in the new industrial environment. And one of the most important things that is of interest for today’s discussion is that in one of the factors facilitating these new phases of economic growth following the crisis has been that a generation of people that had never experienced life without the innovation starts to enter the workforce – thus they are not restricted by old ways of thinking.Next slideexperiencing now some economic historians claim to be due to the innovation of the microprocessor and microelectronics in the 1970s. Similar to what we experienced with the innovation of the steam engine in the late 18th C and the internal combustion engine and electric motor in the late 19th C, there was a subsequent crisis about due to various forces converging. We saw that as these basic innovations were diffused, people stopped investing in the existing industrial structure and instead focused on investing in a new generation of competitive machinery, which then led to an industrial revolution in both cases as the innovations became embedded in society. At the same time, the crisis served to release the negative pressure that had been built up as well as to restore industry profitability through the redistribution of value-added between capital and labor. Wikipedia on alfred chandler : The thesis of each of these works is this: during the 19th century the development of new systems based on steam power and electricity created a Second Industrial Revolution, which resulted in much more capital-intensive industries than had the industrial revolution of the previous centuryThis emphasis on the importance of a cadre of managers to organize and run large-scale corporations was expanded into a "managerial revolution" in The Visible Hand: The Managerial Revolution in American Business (1977) for which he received aPulitzer Prize. He pursued that book's themes in Scale and Scope: The Dynamics of Industrial Capitalism, (1990) and co-edited an anthology on the same themes, with Franco Amatori and Takashi Hikino, Big Business and the Wealth of Nations (1997)Krugman nobel lecture - straight to how bad it's going to get in 09 and what we need to do. he predicts 6% (!) gdp drop in the US. that is unfathomable. 11% unemployment.Other notesNotes from article - Schön, L, Economic Crises and Restructuring in HistoryA crisis is connected with changes in the long term or structural conditions built up during a rather long period of time and effects behavior for a long time to comeTransformation – changes in industrial structure – resources are reallocated between industries and diffusion of basic innovations with industry that provides new bases for such reallocationRationalization – concentration of resources to most productive units within the branches and measures to increase efficiency in different lines of productionShifts between transformation and rationalization have occurred with considerable regularity in structural cycle of 40 years – 25 years on transformation, and 15 years on rationalization. Crises been part of this cycle as wellInternational crisis in 1840s – How go from crisis to expansion quickly – went quite rapidly in 1930s for Sweden – but Sweden in opposite corner in 1970s1850s – upswing of industrial and infrastructural investments was linked to breakthrough of mechanized factories in Sweden, modernization of steel processes and construction of railways1930s and more marked after WWII late 1940s - expansion of electrification and diffusion of automobiles, processing of electrosteel to small motors in handicraft and household – combination with motorcar – new styles in living and consumptionWaves of investments around development of an infrastructure from basic innovation of preceding cycle mid 1970s – microprocessor – knowledge and information in production of goods and servicesIt is not the basic innovation itself – but the diffusion of the innovation that counts!When invented, then expensive to implement, have a narrow range of application – Following generalization – A structural crisis (that has been preceded by an early development of basic innovations) has put an end to old directions of investments mainly in rationalization of existing industrial structure and given rise to investments in ne and devt of new tech that after one decade (the length of the classical Juglar cycle of machinery investments) has created a new generation of economically competitive machineryReallocation of labor occurs approx 15-30 years after the structural crisisDevelopment of markets – distribution of value added between capital and labour is one mirror of these changesDiffusion of innovations leads to expansion of markets and arrival of new competitors – Structural crises – release negative pressure and restored profitability in industry – get rid of those who not competitive
  • Transcript

    • 1. Everyone can talk about networks Ego Formal Networks Networks Regional Social Networks National Networks Innovation Networks Informal Entrepreneurial Networks Networks Infrastructure Electronic Networks Networks Networks Networked of Practice organization 1 FAS.research
    • 2. What is a network?Actor •Actors/Nodes Tie −Individuals −Teams, organizations, etc. •Ties/Links −Knowledge, trust, team, sit by, dislike, etc. −Alliance, customer, investment, etc. A set of actors connected by ties 2
    • 3. 4
    • 4. Did You Know: Shift Happenshttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pMcfrLYD m2U • How are these trends affecting you and your organization? 5
    • 5. 6
    • 6. …with skills in using social media tools to reach out…Communication Self-expressionPersonal CollectiveMedia Intelligence Content Production 8 Rey 2008
    • 7. Swedish hip hop artists Timbuktu ?? Liljeros 2006 9
    • 8. What is the relationshipbetween networks and performance? 10
    • 9. Two individuals with thesame number of contacts… A B 11
    • 10. …but with very different access toresources B A 12
    • 11. Bridging unconnected groups bringsadvantages •More rapid promotions •Greater career mobility •More adaptable to changing environments Brass, Burt, Podolny & Baron, Sparrowe et al, Gargiulo & Benassi 13
    • 12. Performance differs based on one’s network Firm BHigh Lowon-time creative Firm A High Virtual creative community High Low Creative on-time Teigland 2003 14
    • 13. When you hire someone,… …..you “hire” his or her network. 15
    • 14. The strength of weak ties Network B’s Network C’s knowledge knowledge Network A’s Network D’s knowledge knowledge Granovetter 1973 16
    • 15. History tends to repeat itself…. Internal Microelectronics combustion engine Steam engine Third industrial revolution?Late 18th C Late 19th C Late 20th C Schön 2008 17
    • 16. Trust & reciprocityare essential forknowledgeexchange innetworks 18
    • 17. More social get-togethers andcoffee breaks are not the solution 19
    • 18. Go meet someone different or far away 20
    • 19. Creating new knowledge sources…Closed OpenExpensive InexpensiveComplex SimpleAccurate Close enough 21
    • 20. BibliographyfaberNovel. (n.d.). Retrieved fromhttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/faberNovel. (2007, january 15). Retrieved january 15, 2007, fromhttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/John G. Breslin, S. D. (19th May 2008). Semantic TechnologiesConference, (pp. 1-209). San Jose, USA.Laird, K. (2005, may 21). The Web Marketing Company. Retrievedmay 21, 2005, from www.slideshare.net/happykatieRhode, J. ( 2008, June 05). chicago, Illinois, United States.Teigland, D. R. (2007). outside organization, (pp. 1-42).Pennsylvania. 22

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