Motivation

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Motivation Theory

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  • Motivation theoryHow to motivate those that do not want to learn
  • Motivation definition
  • Appropriate level of instruction and materials where the learner sees a reason to learn the subject.Situated learning
  • That one family member…
  • Why are you learning this program? I have to use it for my job.This can be the LEAST motivational
  • The MOST motivational.People learn better in groups (for most types of learning) – Cooperative learning
  • The next level in the course
  • Situated learning, cooperative learning
  • Principles of Motivation:Optimal match between learning opportunities and prior experience/ knowledge.Learner perceives self-relevance of learning domain.Optimal curriculum and instruction.Intrinsic/ExtrinsicApproaches: behavorial – reward/consequences; Cognitive – intrinsic, active/curious, learning is rewardingSociocultural – Identity, maintain relationshios within a commuity, motivated to become like community members we respectHow: Optimal matching – goldilocks - Fits with prior knowledge/experienceIdentification and Self Relevance Perceptions: fulfills need to achieve, enjoyment of task, end goal, relatableScaffolding: builds upon itselfBest way: situated learning - relatable, cooperative group learning - sociocultural
  • Motivation

    1. 1. Motivation Theory
    2. 2. Learner Outcomes• The principles of motivation• Intrinsic and Extrinsic Motivation• Approaches to Motivation• How do we motivate?
    3. 3. An internal state that arouses, directs,and maintains behavior (psyches youup, gets you moving, and keeps you ontask).
    4. 4. The Principles of Motivation• Optimal match between learning opportunities and prior experience/ knowledge.• Learner perceives self-relevance of learning domain.• Optimal curriculum and instruction.
    5. 5. Intrinsic MotivationComes from inside the person:  Desire to learn  Curiosity  Need to improve skills and understanding
    6. 6. Extrinsic motivationComes from outside the person:  Money  Respect  Authority (power)  To not be labeled a deatbeat/loser/welfare case.
    7. 7. The Behavioral ApproachWe are motivated by gaining rewards or avoidingnegative consequences. “I am here for a paycheck”.
    8. 8. Cognitive Approaches• Emphasizes intrinsic motivation• People are active and curious• Learning itself is rewarding “This is interesting, how does it work?”
    9. 9. Sociocultural Approaches• Our need for IDENTITY is what motivates us.• People engage in activities to maintain identities and relationships within a community.• We are motivated to become like the community members we respect. “I am a _________.”
    10. 10. How Do We Motivate?Optimal matching:• Goldilocks – not too hard, not too easy but just right.• The learning must line up with prior knowledge and experience.
    11. 11. Identification and Self-relevance Perceptions• Fulfills the need to achieve• Enjoyment of the task• Serves some end goal• The learning is relatable
    12. 12. ScaffoldingInstruction that builds upon itself: Algebra ->Geometry -> Trig -> Calculus
    13. 13. Conclusion:What is the best way to motivate learners?
    14. 14. What We Learned:• The principles of motivation• Intrinsic and Extrinsic Motivation• Approaches to Motivation• How do we motivate in education/training?

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