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An evaluation of MP Guarantee of Public Service Delivery 2010

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  1. 1. Evaluation and Management Audit of the Madhya Pradesh Lok Sewaon Ke Pradan Ki Gurantee Adhiniyam, 2010 (Madhya Pradesh Guarantee of Public Service Delivery Act, 2010) AN independent report FEBRUARY 2012 Prof. B Muralidharan, Advisor,
  2. 2. ABOUT THE STUDY• This Study was commissioned by the School of Good Governance and Policy Analysis, an Autonomous Society registered under the Societies Registration Act, 1860. It functions from c-324, 3rd Floor, Narmada Bhawan, 59 Arera Hills, Bhopal - 462011 - Madhya Pradesh- India Phone:+91 755 2570216 Web: www.sushasanmp.in• The Commissioning Manager is the Dr. Akhilesh Argal, Director (Governance). He can be contacted at akhilesh.argal@yahoo.com• The Study spanned an overall period about 2 months, and covered the state of Madhya Pradesh, India.• Two field visits were conducted: one, in Bhopal and the other in Vidisha District.• This study was conducted by the Centre for Organization Development, P.O. Cyberabad, Madhapur, Hyderabad - 500081 - Andhra Pradesh - India Phone: +91 40 23118889 Web: www.codhyd.org• Prof. B Muralidharan, Advisor, Centre for Organization Development, Hyderabad was the evaluator; He can be contacted at murali@codhyd.org or rumlia@gmail.com and on Phone: +91 9818101646 Sl. No. Contents Page No. 1 Executive Summary 3 2 Evaluation of the MP Guarantee of Public Service Delivery Act 2010 - Background and Rationale 4-6 3 Purpose, Objectives and Scope of the Evaluation 7-8 4 Methodology and Work Plan 9-10 5 Findings and Observations 11-72 5.a Evaluation 11-31 5.b Management Audit 32-71 6 Conclusions 72-73 7 Recommendations 74-75 8 A Note on Inclusion and Right to Services 76 9 Annexures 77 9.a Terms of Reference 78-80 9.b List of Persons Interviewed 81 9.c List of Documents Consulted 82-83 9.d Evaluator‟s Bio-data 84-87 9.e Acknowledgement 88
  3. 3. 1. Executive Summary in the context of the notified Areas and Findings Recommendations services1. The Act has impacted a large number of 3. Efficiency and Administrative citizens 1. The thrust on awareness building Reforms have got a boost.2. The Act provides key features such as a must be continued. Awareness clearly defined service, a Designated Officer Use of ICT, strengthening of as empowerment is a key to responsible to deliver that service, a Time monitoring and coordinating good governance mechanism have helped in 2. Continue to use ICT for both Limit within which the service will be awareness and to reduce delivered, penalty in case of delay or denial, improvements. physical interface between citizen appeals and review processes 4. The impact on the citizens and government staff3. 56 Services and 16 departments are covered and staff have been in 3. Balance the management by the Act general very positive. There approach to accountability. Bring4. The number of applications from October is enthusiasm amongst in rewards for excellent 2010 till date have crossed 9 10 million; departments and confidence performance to offset the fear services delivered are almost the same psychosis of penalties for erring. in public. 4. Do not restrict excellent public number 5. The programme of service to the implementation of5. Awareness about the act poor, but improving imlementation of the Act – an Act. Instill excellent public6. Reforms undertaken to improve efficiency like and even its expansion – service as a culture across use of ICT have improved efficiency and government. conformity to the Act is eminently possible. 5. Provide sufficient efforts to7. New reforms like a PPP mode on the anvil Constraints of resources ensure that the PPP mode is8. A separate department called the Public and rules have led to led designed and delivered well; Service management Department under the innovative thinking – Lok document the entire process for Chief Minister of Madhya Pradesh to signify Sewa Kendras on a PP others to learn. the importance of the Guarantee 6. Given that still a large number of mode with modest user9. Coordination is good and visible; reviews have applicants are illiterate, use ICT fees. to eliminate fear and middlemen resulted in corrective action – like redrafting 6. The Act and the programme from the service delivery of circulars in easy-to-understand language have had significant mechanism. and with a view to state „How to deliver the national impact. 12 state service?” governments have10. Sincerity in improving effectiveness, even followed suit; at least 3 when efficiency [measured in terms of more are in the offing; > services delivered on time], is patently 50% of the states in India visible and high. See for instance, two impact surveys conducted.11. Innovations in delivery and use of technology are in the offing Conclusions1. the Act and the notified services are extremely relavant in the context of a rights-based approach to public service delivery.2. Thanks to the Act and its implementation, Transparency, Accountability and timeliness have increased in the public service delivery process in Madhya Pradesh, especially
  4. 4. 2. BACKGROUND AND RATIONALE FOR THE STUDYBackground:The Legislative Assembly of Madhya Pradesh passed unanimously the MP Guarantee of Public Service Delivery Act in July 2010. The Act was a path-breaking attempt to provide rights to citizens on essential services and guarantee their service delivery.The Act had its origin in Citizens‟ Charters. Reviews by the state government of these charters found that while a lot of work had been done on theirformulation and efforts made to implement them, consistency across departments and individual government officers was absent. Much depended onthe drive and personality of responsible officers in different departments vis-a-vis implementation and results.Independent studies across the country also revealed that the impact of Citizens Charters on service delivery was varied and positive resultsdepended too much on the enthusiasm of the local actors 1Commenting about their experience, the Public Administration Select Committee, UK, observed:“The Citizen‟s (sic) Charter has had a lasting impact on how public services are viewed in this country. The initiative‟s underlying principles retain their validity nearlytwo decades on – not least the importance of putting the interests of public service users at the heart of public service provision. We believe this cardinal principleshould continue to influence public service reform, and encourage the government to maintain the aims of the Citizen‟s Charter programme given their continuingrelevance to public service delivery today.”On Charter Mark, it commented: “Measures of user satisfaction can shed some light on the quality of public service provision. They should, however, be treated withcare because they are subjective and are sometimes based on less important considerations than service quality.”However, the Committee noted that in the crucial area of outlining the standards of service that people could expect to receive “… the Citizen‟s Charterprogramme was rather confused – promises contained in the charters were often vague and aspirational…” It went on to state “We recommend that there should beclear, precise and enforceable statements of people‟s entitlements to public services. These should be in the form of Public Service Guarantees…”2It is striking to note that at the same time in two different parts of the world – UK, considered one of the most developed nations and Madhya Pradesh,a state considered as struggling to develop - the same theme was being taken up with the conclusions being almost identical.In a National Consultation on Strengthening Delivery and Accountability Frameworks for Public Service organized by the Government ofMadhya Pradesh and UNDP, India, the Chief Minister of Madhya Pradesh observed:“At the time of elections people are the most important. After that the government ignores them. TheCM, Ministers, and bureaucrats, all think that they are perfect and wisdom cannot reside outside thisgroup. In the case of MP, we had introduced One day Governance – Samadhan Ek Din Mein and wehad Citizens Charters.But when we listened to the people, we found that no body looked at the Citizens Charters and no bodybothered about the details. We wanted, then, to introduce a Citizens Charter Act. There were a numberof doubting Thomases. But the question we asked was if we are giving rights through the Charters whyare we scared of fixing responsibility?Thus was born the MP Lok Sewaon Ke Pradan Ki Guarantee Adhiniyam.”3It was in the context of unclear Citizen‟s Charters and non-functional Sevottams, that the Government ofMadhya Pradesh, as stated above, decided to legislate select services as rights of the people in August2010 and implemented from 25 September 2010 onwards. The legislation that was brought in – TheMadhya Pradesh Guarantee of Public Service Delivery Act 2010 – had the following features.1 2007, Public Affairs Centre, Review of India’s Citizens Charters- A Decade of Experience, Public Affairs Centre, Bangalore, India2 2008, House of Commons-Public Administration Select Committee, From Citizen’s Charter to Public Service Guarantees: Entitlements to Public Services, House of Commons, London, UK3 2012, Tina Mathur, Right to Public Services: A Comparative Perspective of Implementation of Guarantee of Public Servicesin Select States of India, Centre for Organization Development, Hyderabad, India 4
  5. 5. 1. Clearly stated services that will be specifically notified by the government 2. A time limit within which the service will be delivered [in days] 3. A Designated Officer of the government who will be held responsible for the service delivery to each and every applicant 4. In the event of failure, a grievance redressal mechanism through a process of First and Second Appeals 5. A scheme for penalty in the event of proven failure on the part of the Designated Officer by the Second Appellate Authority.In the first instance twenty six (26) services delivered by nine (9) departments 4 were notified. The choiceof services were determined by the following factors: 1. Importance of the service to the people, especially the poor and disadvantaged; 2. Willingness of the departments to get the services notified under the Act 3. Feasibility of guarantees: did a realistic chance exist of guaranteed service delivery within a fixed time frame? 4. No other law had already provided a guarantee similar to the one envisaged under the ActRationale for the Study:Since the passage of the Act in September 2010 and its implementation, several developments have taken place. 1. Obviously impressed and inspired with the innovation that this Act brought in public service delivery, several state governments quickly followed in succession enacting laws on similar lines. 2. The Government of Madhya Pradesh had done an impact study through a non-governmental organization in July 2010 of the status of implementation of the Act. It also initiated another set of studies by three (3) institutions to do a follow up study in December 2011-January 2012. 3. The Madhya Pradesh Government, having implemented the Act for a year and on the verge of introducing more changes and learning from new comers, again took the initiative of organizing a National Consultation on Strengthening Delivery and Accountability Frameworks for Public Service, as stated above with the assistance of UNDP India. The consultation provided a fertile ground for an exchange of ideas and different perspectives that came across from different parts of India. 4. Independently, the Centre for Organization Development, Hyderabad in collaboration with Oxfam India, a rights-based organization, was planning to organize a Seminar on Right to Public Services in February 2012. The Seminar aimed at capturing the unusual phenomenon of rights being conferred without agitations and protests, and the new federal spirit of India where states were willing to learn one from the other.Given these developments, the Government of Madhya Pradesh strongly believed that an independent evaluation of the MP Act and its implementationwill add value to its continued and consistent efforts to ensure that the guarantees promised are delivered in letter and spirit.Thus on 27 January, the School of Good Governance and Policy Analysis, an autonomous institution under the aegis of the Government of MadhyaPradesh, wrote to the Centre for Organization Development (COD) to undertake this study since they were already the first independent organization inthe country to organize a national Seminar on Right to Public Services.4 Please see Annexure for a list of Departments and Services that were first notified. 5
  6. 6. 3. PURPOSE, OBJECTIVES AND SCOPE OF THE EVALUATIONPURPOSE:Madhya Pradesh is a state that is considered as a developing state within India that has shown remarkableprogress over the last decade. As of 2011 the state had a population of 72,597,565 of which 37,612,920are males and 34,984,645 are females.5 1. Madhya Pradesh is the second largest state in terms of geographical area and sixth largest state by population in India. The population of Madhya Pradesh is 72.59 million, and the population density is 196 people per square kilometer. More than 75% of state population resides in villages whose main occupation is agriculture. The literacy rate is 63.70%. 2. The Government of Madhya Pradesh implements, various social welfare as well as development-related schemes and programmes through 57 functional departments having their own administrative setup in 50 Districts. 3. The State considers delivery of effective and efficient services to its citizen is the foremost challenge. It was felt that notwithstanding various initiatives of the Government like the citizens charter, the citizens do not get the services from the responsible government officials in time limits prescribed. The problem is more acute in rural areas particularly affecting weaker sections and women. 4. There appeared to be general lack of accountability accentuated by casual attitude of some of the field functionaries. The inability of the citizen to assert and their ignorance of the procedures were adding to the problem. 5. Therefore, the Government of Madhya Pradesh passed the “Madhya Pradesh Lok Sevaon ke Pradan ki Guarantee Adhiniyam 2010” (Madhya Pradesh Guarantee of Public Service Delivery Act, 2010) in August 2010 and implemented from 25th September 2010. This land mark legislation provides 5.1.1. Statutory justifiable right to the eligible citizen to obtain notified services within stipulated time frame, from the designated officers, who are made legally duty bound to provide the service to entitled applicant. 5.1.2. In case designated officer fails to provide service, a two-tier grievance redressal mechanism in the form of first appeal and second appeal. 5.1.3. Imposition of penalty on the errant officials and compensation to the aggrieved applicant who may have been wrongfully denied the service. 5.1.4. To implement above design of the act, it is made mandatory that every applicant gets a receipt of the application for a notified service, indicating the date by which the service will be delivered and in case the service is not provided by the date indicated in the receipt by the designated officer, redressal mechanism may be set in motion. 5.1.5. This initiative is a major paradigm shift in the policy regime of citizen charter that was a mere intent of the government to a right based delivery, akin to shifting an item from directive principal of the state policy to the area of fundamental right.According to the Terms of Reference of this study, the purposes of the study are: 1. The Government of Madhya Pradesh, after about 15 months of implementation of the above Act, desires an independent evaluation of the implementation of the Act. 2. This evaluation of the Act and its implementation is to get an independent view of the promulgation of the Act, the services rendered, and their relevance. This independent evaluation is deemed necessary at this point of time, as the Government of Madhya Pradesh desires to know the impact and introduce changes where necessary. 3. This report should be useful first and foremost to the residents of Madhya Pradesh in getting the service efficiently and secondly to the Government of Madhya Pradesh to improve the service delivery system.OBJECTIVES:5 2011, Census Of India, Population Chapter, Madhya Pradesh, Census of India, Delhi 6
  7. 7. Essentially after having implemented the Act for over a year and a half and after having lead discussions onthe subject in the country, the Government of Madhya Pradesh is keen to analyse and document the impactand lessons learnt, as also find ways and means of improving its public service delivery.Specifically, the objectives, as stated in the Terms of Reference, are: 1. The objectives of the Evaluation are to study if the principle components of the Act – Transparency, Accountability and Timeliness - have been achieved and if so to what extent. 2. The study will cover the Implementation modalities of the Act and issues arising thereof. 3. The study will make suggestions to strengthen the Government of Madhya Pradesh’s attempts in achieving its objectives in relation to the Act.SCOPE OF THE STUDY:Consistent with its purpose and objectives the scope of the study was set down as follows in the terms ofreference:The study will cover the following areas: 1.The process adopted in passing the legislation. 2. The legal provisions related to Transparency, Accountability and Timeliness. 3. The choice of notified services. 4. The extent of implementation. 5. The study will cover the entire gamut of services notified under the Act. 6. The study will be based largely on the data derived from the MIS created specifically for monitoring the implementation of the Act and other secondary sources. 7. Where feasible, the consultant will make 1 or 2 field visits. 8. Where feasible, the consultant will use his/her prior information / knowledge. 7
  8. 8. 4. METHODOLOGY AND WORKPLANMETHODOLOGY:The methodology adopted for the evaluation study was two fold: 1. Primary observations in two (2) field visits to service delivering institutions and select interviews with staff and applicants there: a. Bhopal District Collectorate b. Vidisha District – Tehsil Office, Municipal Office, and Electricity Supply Office 2. Primary Data collected by the Governemnt of Madhya Pradesh a. The status of applications received, services rendered, pending applications, etc. b. Survey of the impact of the Act over two periods: July 2011 and December 2011-January 2012 c. Documents shared by the government and available on the MIS related to issues like the Lok Sewa Week, Digital Notarization, etc. d. Hard copies of government orders, budget papers, circulars and other relevant documents shared by the Government of Madhya Pradesh. 3. Interviews with Department Officials (especially the Head and his Deputy) and the Officers of the School of Good Governance and Policy Analysis, Bhopal. 4. Cases where found appropriate, the consultant, has made use of his knowledge of the implementation of similar Acts in others states of India.This Methodology was adopted given the time constraints and as the Terms of Reference state: “theobjective of the study is to quickly assess the status of implementation and suggest recommendations forthe future on 3 dimensions [transparency, accountability and timeliness] which are possible with the dataavailable.”WORK PLAN:The work plan for the study was as follows:Item Start Time End Time Remarks Decided by the School ofApproval of the Proposal Good GovernanceStudy – Preliminary Visit and Will be in 13-02-12 14-02-12Discussion Bhopal To be provided byList of Documents required by COD 14-02-12 22-02-12 School of Good Governance Soft copy toAnalysis and Draft Evaluation 26-02-12 26-02-12 be mailed by CODDiscussions and „Management‟ This will be in 27-02 28-02-12Response to Findings BhopalSubmission of the Evaluation Study 29-02-12Report by CODAs part of the preliminary visit on 13th and 14th February, the consultant, apart from discussions with theconcerned officials visited the Bhopal Collectorate and the Vidisha District. 8
  9. 9. Management Audit:In addition to these, the consultant had developed a questionnaire, based on and adapted from thoseutilized for ISO certification, to conduct an audit of the larger management processes. Please note that thisaudit is NOT operational, financial, detailed process or project management audit. It is in the nature of auditto understand the conformity or otherwise to larger strategic and general management areas. It was alsoaimed to understand how the implementation of such an Act where the line departments (16 of them)deliver services and the Public Service Management coordinates them; surely not a typical projectmanagement structure.The consultant shared the questionnaire with the client, and based on the initial response (filled inquestionnaire), sought clarifications and further details. The Audit table was finalized after a final round ofdiscussions with the client on 28th February 2012. 9
  10. 10. 5. FINDINGS AND OBSERVATIONS 5.a EVALUATIONS STUDYPhase I: SEPTEMBER 2010- JULY 2011As stated in the foregoing sections the Madhya Pradesh Guarantee of Public Service Delivery Act waspassed by the Legislative Assembly in August 2010 and implementation commenced from 25th September2010.In the first instance twenty six (26) services delivered by nine (9) departments were notified. The notificationcaptured the key features of the guarantee: a) the serviceto be delivered on receipt of a full and complete application , b) the Designated Officer accountable for the delivery of the service, c) the time limit for service delivery, d) the First Appellate Authorityto whom an appeal could be preferred by the applicant , e) time to dispose the first appeal off, and f) the Second Appellate Authority.Please find below the first list of notified services and relevant details thereof. 10
  11. 11. The first set of Notified Services under the MP Guarantee of Public Service Delivery Act 2010 – September 2010 11
  12. 12. 1. Energy DepartmentSr No. Services Designation of Designated Defined timelines Designation of Defined timelines for Designation of Second Officer for providing the First Appellate disposal of First Appellate Authority Services Officer Appeal1.1 Providing demand letter for individual new electricity low tension connection in places where such connection could be provided through the existing network a. Zone/Urban Distribution Centre office Zonal/Distribution Centre 11 working days Executive 30 working days Superintendent Engineer incharge Engineer b. Rural Areas Distribution Centre 16 working days Executive 30 working days Superintendent Engineer incharge Engineer1.2 Provision of low-tension new electricity connections through existing network upon deposit of amount as per the demand letter a. Zone/Urban Distribution Centre office Zonal/Distribution Centre 10 working days Executive 30 working days Superintendent Engineer incharge Engineer b. Rural Areas Distribution Centre 14 working days Executive 30 working days Superintendent Engineer incharge Engineer1.3 Provision of temporary connections upto 10 KVA upon deposit of fees where there is no requirement of expansion in the existing infrastructure a. Zone/Urban Distribution Centre office Zonal/Distribution Centre 3 working days Executive 30 working days Superintendent Engineer incharge Engineer b. Rural Areas Distribution Centre 3 working days Executive 30 working days Superintendent Engineer incharge Engineer1.4 Issuance of demand letter for increasing the load of equipments upon submission of all the documents by the consumer where there is no requirement of expansion in the existing infrastructure 12
  13. 13. a. Zone/Urban Distribution Centre office Zonal/Distribution Centre 7 working days Executive 30 working days Superintendent Engineer incharge Engineer b. Rural Areas Distribution Centre 7 working days Executive 30 working days Superintendent Engineer incharge Engineer1.5 Increasing the load upon deposit of amount and supplementary contracting as per the demand letter where there is no requirement of expansion in the existing infrastructure a. Zone/Urban Distribution Centre office Zonal/Distribution Centre 7 working days Executive 30 working days Superintendent Engineer incharge Engineer b. Rural Areas Distribution Centre 7 working days Executive 30 working days Superintendent Engineer incharge Engineer1.6 Inspection of meter upon receiving complaints from low-voltage consumers regarding non-functional or fast meters and to repair or replace such erratic meters a. Zone/Urban Distribution Centre office Zonal/Distribution Centre 22 working days Executive 30 working days Superintendent Engineer incharge Engineer b. Rural Areas Distribution Centre 37 working days Executive 30 working days Superintendent Engineer incharge Engineer 13
  14. 14. 2. Labour DepartmentSr No. Services Designation of Designated Defined timelines Designation of Defined timelines for Designation of Second Officer for providing the First Appellate disposal of First Appellate Authority Services Officer Appeal2.1 Providing benefits of Maternity Rural Areas – 30 working days Sub divisional 30 working days Collector Assistance Plan CEO, Janpad Panchayat officer, Revenue Urban Areas – Authorised Labour Officer or municipal Commissioner/Chief Municipal Officer where there is no labour office2.2 Providing benefits of Marriage Rural Areas – 30 working days Sub divisional 30 working days Collector Assistance Plan CEO, Janpad Panchayat officer, Revenue Urban Areas – Authorised Labour Officer or Municipal Commissioner/Chief Municipal Officer where there is no labour office2.3 Providing benefits of Compassionate Rural Areas - CEO, Janpad 30 working days Sub divisional 30 working days Collector Assistance on death Panchayat officer, Revenue Urban Areas - Authorised Labour Officer or Municipal Commissioner/Chief Municipal Officer where there is no labour office 14
  15. 15. 3. Public Health Engineering DepartmentSr No. Services Designation of Designated Defined timelines Designation of Defined timelines for Designation of Second Officer for providing the First Appellate disposal of First Appellate Authority Services Officer Appeal3.1 Minor repairs in the above ground part Sub Engineer 7 working days Assistant Engineer 7 working days Executive Engineer of departmental handpump3.2 Major repairs in the line assembly and Sub Engineer 15 working days Assistant Engineer 15 working days Executive Engineer cylinder of hand pump in the subsoil part of departmental hand pump4. Revenue DepartmentSr No. Services Designation of Designated Defined timelines Designation of Defined timelines for Designation of Second Officer for providing the First Appellate disposal of First Appellate Authority Services Officer Appeal4.1 Providing economic assistance in the Sub divisional officer, 30 working days Collector 30 working days Divisional Commissioner event of loss of limb or death due to Revenue natural tragedy according to Revenue Book of circulars 6(4).4.2 Providing copies of current Tahsildar or authorised 5 working days Sub divisional 30 working days Collector Khasra/Khatauni revenue officer by him officer, Revenue4.3 Providing copies of current land maps Tehsildar/Additional 15 working days Sub divisional 30 working days Collector Tehsildar/Naib Tehsildar officer, Revenue (according to their jurisdiction)4.4 Provision of Land Rights and Debt Book Tehsildar/Additional 15 working days Sub divisional 30 working days Collector for the first time Tehsildar/Naib Tehsildar officer, Revenue (according to their jurisdiction)4.5 Provision of Second copy (Duplicate Tehsildar/Additional 45 working days Sub divisional 30 working days Collector copy) Land Rights and Debt Book Tehsildar/Naib Tehsildar officer, Revenue (according to their jurisdiction) 15
  16. 16. 5. Urban Administration and Development DepartmentSr No. Services Designation of Designated Officer Defined timelines Designation of Defined timelines for Designation of Second for providing the First Appellate disposal of First Appellate Authority Services Officer Appeal5.1 Provision of new water 1) Nagarpalika/Nagar Panchayat Area - 30 working days 1) Sub divisional 30 working days 1) Collector connection wherever Chief Municipal Officer officer (Revenue) possible 2) Municipal Corporation area -Officer 2) Commissioner 2) Collector authorised by Commissioner (if Municipal authorised) Corporation 3) Commissioner Municipal Corporation 3) Collector 3) Divisional Commissioner6. General Administration DepartmentSr No. Services Designation of Designated Officer Defined timelines Designation of Defined timelines for Designation of Second for providing the First Appellate disposal of First Appellate Authority Services Officer Appeal6.1 Issuance of domicile Tehsildar/Additional Tehsildar/Naib 7 working days Sub divisional 15 working days Collector certificate Tehsildar (according to their officer, Revenue jurisdiction)7. Social Justice DepartmentSr No. Services Designation of Designated Officer Defined timelines Designation of Defined timelines for Designation of Second for providing the First Appellate disposal of First Appellate Authority Services Officer Appeal7.1 First time sanction and 1. For Rural Areas - CEO, Janpad 60 working days Sub divisional 60 working days Collector provision of Social Security Panchayat officer, Revenue Pension 2. For urban areas a) Commissioner, Municipal 60 working days a) Collector 60 working days Divisional Commissioner Corporation b) Chief Municipal Officer, 60 working days b) Sub divisional 60 working days Collector Nagarpalika/Nagar Panchayat officer, Revenue 16
  17. 17. 7.2 First time sanction and 1. For Rural Areas - CEO, Janpad 60 working days Sub divisional 60 working days Collector provision of Indira Gandhi Panchayat officer, Revenue National Old Age Pension 2. For urban areas a) Commissioner, Municipal 60 working days a) Collector 60 working days Divisional Commissioner Corporation b) Chief Municipal Officer, 60 working days b) Sub divisional 60 working days Collector Nagarpalika/Nagar Panchayat officer, Revenue7.3 First time sanction and 1. For Rural Areas - CEO, Janpad 60 working days Sub divisional 60 working days Collector provision of Indira Gandhi Panchayat officer, Revenue National Widow Pension 2. For urban areas a) Commissioner, Municipal 60 working days a) Collector 60 working days Divisional Commissioner Corporation b) Chief Municipal Officer, 60 working days b) Sub divisional 60 working days Collector Nagarpalika/Nagar Panchayat officer, Revenue7.4 First time sanction and 1. For Rural Areas - CEO, Janpad 60 working days Sub divisional 60 working days Collector provision of Indira Gandhi Panchayat officer, Revenue National Disability Pension 2. For urban areas a) Commissioner, Municipal 60 working days a) Collector 60 working days Divisional Commissioner Corporation b) Chief Municipal Officer, 60 working days b) Sub divisional 60 working days Collector Nagarpalika/Nagar Panchayat officer, Revenue7.5 Provision of National 1. For Rural Areas - CEO, Janpad 30 working days Sub divisional 30 working days Collector Family Assistance Panchayat officer, Revenue 2. For urban areas a) Commissioner, Municipal 30 working days a) Collector 30 working days Divisional Commissioner Corporation b) Chief Municipal Officer, 30 working days b) Sub divisional 30 working days Collector Nagarpalika/Nagar Panchayat officer, Revenue 17
  18. 18. 8. Tribal Welfare and Scheduled Castes Welfare DepartmentSr No. Services Designation of Designated Officer Defined timelines Designation of Defined timelines for Designation of Second for providing the First Appellate disposal of First Appellate Authority Services Officer Appeal8.1 Disposal of applications for District Coordinator/Assistant 30 working days a) Collector 15 working days Divisional Commissioner non-receipt of relief under Commissioner, Aboriginal Castes and MP Scheduled Scheduled Castes Welfare Department Castes/Tribes Emergency Plan Rule 19959. Food, Civil Supplies & Consumer Protection DepartmentSr No. Services Designation of Designated Officer Defined timelines Designation of Defined timelines for Designation of Second for providing the First Appellate disposal of First Appellate Authority Services Officer Appeal9.1 Issuance of New BPL Assistant Supply Officer in the urban 30 working days District Supply 30 working days Collector Ration Cards area of District HQ Controller/ District Supply Officer Tehsildar in remaining urban and rural 30 working days Sub divisional 30 working days Collector areas except urban area of District HQ officer, Revenue9.2 Issuance of New APL Commissioner/ Chief Municipal Officer 30 working days District Supply 30 working days Collector Ration Cards of urban body situated in the district HQ Controller/ District Supply Officer Commissioner/ Chief Municipal Officer 30 working days Sub divisional 30 working days Collector of urban areas except urban areas of officer, Revenue district HQ Secretary of Gram Panchayat of rural 30 working days Tehsildar 30 working days Sub divisional officer, areas of district Revenue 18
  19. 19. ORGANIZATION STRUCTUREThe Government of Madhya Pradesh created a new Department called the Public Service ManagementDepartment in September 2010 to coordinate the activities, monitor the progress of implementation of theAct and suggest changes that might be required for improving implementation and enhancing effectiveness.By a Government Order notified in the Gazette on 10th September 2010, the government also changed itsBusiness Allocation Rules to facilitate and streamline this process [Gazette Notification Ref. No. F-1-13 -2010-ONE (1) dt. 10-09-2010].A new position of District Managers was created for coordination and monitoring help. The posts were filledwith either experienced, recently retired officials or young, experienced Management Graduates fromreputed institutions. The experienced officers were provided training in ICT related areas, and themanagement graduates were trained in government structures, rules of business, office procedures, etc. AllDistrict Managers were trained on all aspects of the Act and nuances of the Act were highlighted.AWARENESS:The Act with the above Notified Services were in operation for a period of about 9 months (October 2010 –June 2011). During this period a round of training was provided to all the relevant officials in the districits andthe state head quarters. These training sessions were based on instructions that were available for theimplementation of the Act and the specifics of each service.Simaltaneously, the Government of Madhya Pradesh (GoMP) had organized a major campaign to raise theawareness of the citizens to whom the rights were conferred and to elected representatives of the Local SelfGovernments. The GoMP had carried out this campaign through various media: - News Papers - Television - Radio - Prominent display of hoardings and boards as dictated by the Act - Word-of-mouthTo ensure that proper data was available for monitoring the progress of implementation the GoMP conceiveda simple software. While the records were being kept manually at the service rendering centres, they wereasked to enter data in a specific format that showed: 1. Applications received 2. Applications disposed off within the specified time limit 3. Applications rejected for being incomplete/in-eligble 4. Pending Applications: a. Which Exceeded time limit b. Within time limitA sample of the data extracted from the MIS system for the period 1st October 2010 to 31st March 2011 isreproduced below. Sl.No Dept Applications received Pending applications Service APPLICATIONS TOTAL Time Within total DELIEVRED Rejected limit time over limit (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) 1 GAD 191829 411 192240 229 39 268 2 Revenue 1930033 6387 1936420 947 360 1307 3 Energy 875315 3328 878643 292 3063 3355 19
  20. 20. 4 LABOUR 16634 1808 18442 2 160 162 URBAN ADMN. 5 18253 144 18397 16 353 369 & DEVPT TRIBAL 6 544 5 549 0 0 0 WELFARE 7 Social justice 169285 17296 186581 291 1941 2232 FOOD &CIVIL 8 49034 1922 50956 0 423 423 SUPPLY Pub. Health 9 11078 1 11079 0 0 0 Engg. Dept. Total 3262005 31302 3293307 1777 6339 8116As can be observed a substantial majority of the applications were disposed off on time. A minority ofapplications were rejected and a further small minority of valid applications had not been disposed off withinthe stipulated time limit.A STRATEGIC AND DETERMINED MOVE BY THE GOMP:Despite getting kudos from all, and having by this time [July 2011] been emulated by other stategovernments like Uttar Pradesh, Delhi, Punjab, the GoMP did not rest on on its laurels.In an appreciable move, they decided to study the impact of the implementation further not just through MISreports that essentially came through its own channels, but by conducting a survey through a third party- theJan Abhiyan Parishad, an autonomous society. The study commissioned in July 2011 had an intersting storyto tell.FIRST IMPACT STUDYThe study was based on interviews [primary data collection] and on secondary sources from the governmentrecords. The survey was conducted in 22 Blocks of 11 Districts of 10 Divisions of the state. In all 1225respondents were contacted. Approximately 490 were applicants for services, about 415 general public and300 elected representatives of the Local Self Governments.The results were revealing. Some highlights follow:1. Only 1 in 4 (302 out of the 1225) were aware of the features of the Act;2. Even fewer amongst the applicants were aware of the provisions for appeals (1.6%) and penalty thatcould be levied on the Designated Officer or the First Appellate Authority (0%).3. Most came to know about the Act and its features largely from News papers, Government Orders/Displaysand „Word-of-mouth‟4. Only 142 out of 490 were provided with acknowledgement receipt at the time of acceptance ofapplications.4. Self-declared on-time service delivery by applicants was, however, as high as about 70%. While this wasless than what the MIS reports showed, as these were self-declared reports, these too should be taken witha lit bit of errors in margin.5. Amongst the elected representatives only 94 out of 304 respondents were aware of the provisions of theAct. The proportion rose with rank (Proportionally more Members of a District Panchayat knew about it, thanHeads of Gram Panchayats than Members of Gram panchayats.)Alarmed at the results the GoMP began to take quick action; some of which were: 20
  21. 21. 1. Improve awareness through different means: a Service Delivery Week and using folk songs, and dance to spread the message. 2. Increase the number of training programmes and the quality of its content 3. Provide provisions for initiating appeals suo moto by the 1st Appellate Officer and Second Appeal Authority 4. Initiate a process where computerized acknowledgement receipts were to be provided to applicants. 5. On-line applications registration 6. SMS based acknowledgement 7. A regular review at the highest levels. 8. Lack of Appeals even when a few hundreds of services (out of a few million) were not delivered on time was construed to be a function of lack of awareness. 9. Despite difficulties, induce existing departments to notify more services under the Act, and induce departments not under the Act to agree to come under its purview and notify some services.PHASE II – JULY 2011 TO NOVEMBER 2011FOLLOW-UP ON THE IMPACT STUDYA. AWARENESS AND TRANSPARENCY1. Serious and concerted efforts were made by the Public Service management Department to push officialsand elected representatives to take up awareness campaigns. Organzing rallies and press conferences weresuggested. Engaging children in innovative ways and delivering services ina ceremonial manner were takenup. The appropriate officials were also required to document these seriously. These were again monitoredthrough the MIS created by the Madhya Pradesh wing of the National Informatics Centre (NIC). More than20,000 Gram Sabhas were organized during this period and compliance of total coverage was close to 90%.2. The GoMP decided to declare a week in September as the annual Lok Sewa Week and 25 September asannual LokSeva Day.3. A check of the MIS showed that districts participated actively in documenting their awareness campaignsand in providing valuable feedback from the ground level. A random check of a district – Damoh – revealedthe following. 129 out of 161 Gram panchayats were encouraged to hold Special Gram Sabhas on the issueof Guarantee of Public Service Delivery. Kits were issued to District Panchayats to display on the wallsduring a workshop held for the District Panchayat members on 10th September 2011. Several groups weretrained on the features of the Act and a press conference was held on the same date [10-09-2011] to ensurethat the local press gives the guarantees wide publicity.4. Locally popular methods were adopted to promote awareness during the Lok Sewa week. The followingpictures from Sehore district [provided by the department] show a glimpse of these efforts.Local newspapers, too, it appeared, were happy to carry the news of the guarantees during this period. 21
  22. 22. B. IMPROVING EFFICIENCY: INTRODUCTION OF COMPUTERS AT THE FRONT-END SERVICEDELIVERING CENTRES:By coordinating with the nine departments (initially), the PSM Department ensured that in a phased mannerthe line departments will utilize their own budget to equip their front offices with computers and internetconnectivity. By the end of 2011 they had ensured that at least half of the nearly 313 Blocks of MadhyaPradesh had been covered. About 50% of the designated officers get connected at the Block level; by end2012 all to be connected.In almost all cases, the front offices were mandated to register all applications „on-line‟ in the computers.This was linked to the respective Designated and Nodal Officers at different levels. Officials were now able totrack the status of applications in a manner that was of help to them: a status picture, plus a dash board thatwarned them of delays, and a day-wise status of pending applications.A snap shot of the status between 1st April 2011 and September 2011 is shown below:RED: denotes lapsed time limitAMBER and YELLOW: denote that there is just about enough timeGREEN: denotes that sufficient time is available for disposal of the applications.An added benefit of the computerization drive was that an SMS-based acknowledgement could be sent tothe applicants as indicated by the photograph which the consultant took in Vidisha district Tehsil Office. Ascreen shot of on-line registraion in the same office is also shown below. 22
  23. 23. S. Departm Applicat Applications Disposed Applications Disposed Pending Applications Number within time limit after time limit is overNo ent ion of Servic Service Tot Servic Service Tot Beyo Whose Time limit Tot Receive Incompl e Applicat al e Applicat al nd will be over al d ete deliver ion deliver ion Time Tod In In Applicati ed Rejecte ed Rejecte limit ay two Thr afte ons d d da ee r ys day thr s ee day s(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12 (13) (14) (15) (16) ) General 1 201682 195658 1374 197032 888 19 907 3267 0 0 0 0 3267 476 Administration 2 Home 146 86 0 86 0 0 0 27 0 0 3 30 60 0 3 Revenue 437027 429133 542 429675 1703 16 1719 4680 0 0 2 241 4923 710 4 Transport 6915 4775 73 4848 0 0 0 2047 0 0 0 0 2047 20 5 Forest 94 34 0 34 5 1 6 26 2 0 0 4 32 22 6 Energy 131602 123398 2939 126337 597 58 655 3462 28 4 12 20 3526 1084 7 Labour 27877 20811 2581 23392 115 20 135 2837 110 7 91 604 3649 701 Urban 8 Administration 18466 15443 574 16017 23 4 27 1263 113 7 89 645 2117 305 and Development Rural 9 585 438 18 456 0 0 0 82 0 0 0 40 122 7 Development 10 Tribal Welfare 385 340 19 359 0 0 0 20 1 0 0 4 25 1 11 Social Justice 133144 98665 10273 108938 467 52 519 5197 286 109 257 12564 18413 5274 Food, civil supplies and 12 68782 61487 1080 62567 263 13 276 3618 167 32 141 1137 5095 844 consumer Protection Public health 13 10418 9917 52 9969 19 2 21 398 0 0 0 0 398 30 engineering Women and child 14 2451 444 1 445 0 0 0 890 1 59 146 753 1849 157 welfare Total 1039574 960629 19526 980155 4080 185 4265 27814 708 218 741 16042 45523 9631 23
  24. 24. C. INCREASING THE COVERAGE: NUMBER OF SERVICESIn July 2011 the PSM Department intiated a process of inducing departments already covered under the Actto include and notify more services, while asking other departments if they would like to offer any of theirservices to be included under the Act.A series of discussions with the departments followed.7 new departments with 18 services joined in to guarantee service delivery, and of the existing 9departments 5 decided to add on 8 more services.In all, then, by 24th September 2011 52 services delivered by 16 Departments of the GoMP were covered bythe Act. The additions to the earlier 26 Services and 9 Departments are provided in the Table below. 24
  25. 25. Second Notification: Departments AND Services added under MP Guarantee of Public Service Delivery Act 2010 July 2011 1. Energy Department Sr No. Services Designation of Designated Defined timelines Designation of Defined timelines for Designation of Second Officer for providing the First Appellate disposal of First Appellate Authority Services Officer Appeal 1.7 Disposal of Application pertaining to Permanent Disconnection a. Zone/Urban Distribution Centre office Zonal/Distribution Centre 30 working days Executive Engineer 7 working days Superintendent Engineer incharge b. Rural Areas Distribution Centre 30 working days Executive Engineer 7 working days Superintendent Engineer incharge 2. Labour Department Sr No. Services Designation of Designated Defined timelines Designation of Defined timelines for Designation of Second Appellate Officer for providing the First Appellate disposal of First Authority Services Officer Appeal 2.4 Registration of Construction Workers Rural Areas 30 days Sub Divisional 30 days District Collector CEO of Jila Panchayat; Officer, Revenue Urban :authorised Labour Officer; District Collector 30 days Sub Divisional 30 days Where no Labour Officer is Officer, Revenue posted 1.Commissioner of 30 days Collector 30 days Divisional Commissioner Municipal Corporation 2. CMO of Municipality as 30 days Sub Divisional 30 days District Collector the case may be Officer, Revenue 2.5 Financial Assistance in case of permanent Rural Areas 30 days Sub Divisional 30 days District Collector disability caused in construction work CEO of Jila Panchayat; Officer, Revenue Urban :authorised Labour Officer; District Collector 30 days Sub Divisional 30 days Where no Labour Officer is Officer, Revenue posted 1.Commissioner of Municipal 30 days Collector 30 days Divisional Commissioner Corporation 2. CMO of Municipality as the 30 days case may be Sub Divisional 30 days District Collector Officer, Revenue 25
  26. 26. 4. RevenueSr No. Services Designation of Designated Defined timelines for Designation of Defined timelines Designation of Second Officer providing the Services First Appellate for disposal of First Appellate Authority Officer Appeal4.6 Compensation for crop damage caused Tehsildar/ 30 days SDO, Revenue 30 days District Collector by wild animals Additional Tehsildar/ Naib Tehsildar4.7 No Objection Certificate (NOC) for Nazul Officer 1 month District Collector 15 days Divisional Commissioner Nazul land4.8 Solvency Certificate Tehsildar/ Addl. 45 days Sub Divisional 15 days Divisional Commissioner Tehsildar/Naib Tehsildar- Officer (SDO) up to Rs.5 lakhs SDO: up to Rs.25 lakhs 45 days District Collector 15 days Divisional Commissioner District Collector: more 45 days Divisional 15 days Secretary, Revenue than Rs.25 lakhs Commissioner Department 5. Urban Administration and DevelopmentSr No. Services Designation of Designated Defined timelines for Designation of Defined timelines Designation of Second Officer providing the Services First Appellate for disposal of First Appellate Authority Officer Appeal5.2 Fresh inclusion in BPL (below Poverty SDO Revenue 30 days District Collector 30 days Divisional Commissioner Line) List 6. General Administration DepartmentSr No. Services Designation of Designated Defined timelines for Designation of Defined timelines Designation of Second Officer providing the Services First Appellate for disposal of First Appellate Authority Officer Appeal6.2 Income Certificate Tehsildar/Additional 3 days SDO 7 days District Collector Tehsildar/Naib Tehsildar 10. Forest DepartmentSr No. Services Designation of Designated Defined timelines for Designation of Defined timelines Designation of Second Officer providing the Services First Appellate for disposal of First Appellate Authority Officer Appeal10.1 Relief for death caused by wild animals Range Officer 3 days Divisional Forest 15 days Conservator of Officer/dy Forests/regional director of director/asst protected area director of protected area/10.2 Relief for harm/injuries caused by wild Range Officer 7 days Divisional Forest 15 days Conservator of animals Officer/dy Forests/regional director of director/asst protected area director of protected area/ 26
  27. 27. 10.3 Relief for damage caused to cattle Range Officer 30 days Divisional Forest 30 days Conservator of Officer/dy Forests/regional director of director/asst protected area director of protected area/10.4 Payments in malik makbuja cases 1 In cases where wood is Divisional Forest Officer 45 days Conservator of 30 days Additional Principal Chief received in government Forests Conservator of Forests depot. (Production) 2 In cases of complete Divisional Forest Officer 30 days Conservator of 30 days Additional Principal Chief recovery of sale value in Forests Conservator of Forests cases of separate lots. (Production)10.5 Permits to carry wood 1 Forest Range 3 days Dy. Divisional 15 days Divisional Forest Officer Officer for Forest Officer Government depot 2 Forest Range 10 days D. Divisional 15 days Divisional Forest Officer Officer for Forest Officer registered Dealers/produc ers 3 Deputy 30 days Divisional Forest 15 days Conservator of Forests divisional forest Officer officer for wood received from land owner.11. Home DepartmentSr No. Services Designation of Designated Defined timelines for Designation of Defined timelines Designation of Second Officer providing the Services First Appellate for disposal of First Appellate Authority Officer Appeal11.1 Copy of the Post Mortem report Inspector-in-charge of the 30 days SDOP/ Suptd. Of 15 days Suptd. Of Police (SP) Police Station Police (SP)- City11.2 Copy of the First Information Report Inspector-in-charge of the 1 day SDOP/SP-City 7 days SP (FIR) Police Station11.3days Renewal of Arms License before expiry District Magistrate 15 days Divisional 7 days Secretary, Home date for weapons of non-prohibited Commissioner Department bore11.4 Renewal of Arms license after expiry District Magistrate 45 days Divisional 15 days Secretary, Home date for weapons of non-prohibited Commissioner Department bore 12. Public Health and Family Welfare Department Sr No. Services Designation of Designated Defined timelines for Designation of Defined timelines Designation of Second Officer providing the Services First Appellate for disposal of First Appellate Authority Officer Appeal 27
  28. 28. 12.1 Sanction from State fund for Financial Chief Medical and Health 10 days Divisional/Joint 15 days Commissioner of Health Assistance during illness, cases upto 1.0 Officer (CM&HO) Director of Services lakh (district level) Health12.2 Disability Certificate Civil Surgeon 15 days Chief Medical 15 days District Collector and Health Officer12.3 Issue of Deen Dayal a) Dist. HQ- 7 days District Collector 15 days Divisional Commissioner UpadhyayTreatment Scheme- Cards CM&HO b) Other than Dist. 7 days CM&HO 15 days District Collector HQ- Block medical Officer13. Farmers Welfare and Agriculture DepartmentSr No. Services Designation of Designated Defined timelines for Designation of Defined timelines Designation of Second Officer providing the Services First Appellate for disposal of First Appellate Authority Officer Appeal 13.1 Issue of License – Chemicals, Fertilizers, Dy. Director of Agriculture 30 days Divisional Jt. 15 days Director of the Department Pesticides and Seeds in Dist. Director, Agriculture 13.2 Renewal of License- Chemicals, Dy. Director of Agriculture 30 days Divisional Jt. 15 days Director of the Fertilizers, Pesticides, and Seeds in Dist. Director, Department/District Agriculture Collector 14. Women and Child Development Department Sr No. Services Designation of Designated Defined timelines for Designation of Defined timelines Designation of Second Officer providing the Services First Appellate for disposal of First Appellate Authority Officer Appeal 14.1 Laadli Lakshmi Scheme Child Development Project 30 days Dist Women and 15 days District Collector Officer Child development Officer 15. Transport Department Sr No. Services Designation of Designated Defined timelines for Designation of Defined timelines Designation of Second Officer providing the Services First Appellate for disposal of First Appellate Authority Officer Appeal 15.1 Issue of Learner’s License Regional Transport Officer 10 days District Collector 15 days Divisional Commissioner 15.2 Vehicle Fitness Certificate Regional Transport Officer 15 days District Collector 30 days Divisional Commissioner 16. Panchayat Raj and Rural Development Department Sr No. Services Designation of Designated Defined timelines for Designation of Defined timelines Designation of Second Officer providing the Services First Appellate for disposal of First Appellate Authority Officer Appeal 16.1 Fresh addition of name in the Below Tehsildar/Additional 30 days SDO Revenue 30 days Divisional Commissioner 28
  29. 29. Poverty Line (BPL) List Tehsildar/Naib Tehsildar 29
  30. 30. D. INCREASING EFFECTIVENESS:A key insight that the PSM Department got by its inward looking analysis was that circulars related to thedelivery of services were in language that was not very clear, sometimes even to the government officers.Interpretational flexibility led to different ways of functioning.In an important move, the PSM Department coordinated with all the line departments and set up a series ofmeetings. The PSM departments role was to ensure that everyone understood the spirit and letter of the MPGuarantee of Public Service Delivery Act 2010 and to encourage the concerned stakeholders to come upwith revised circulars that clearly indicated, in unambiguous language, HOW A SERVICE IS TO BEDEFINED AND DELIVERED.The results of these long deliberations [between November 2-5, 2011] that includedOfficers of the PSMDepartment, the District Managers, hired for coordination by the PSM Department, and for eachservice/department 2 Designated Officers, 1 Appellate Authority, and members of the District Administration,were clearly explicated circulars for each service that is now being brought out as a compendium for readyreference and use.E. COMBINING EFFICIENCY AND EFFECTIVENESS:Realizing the inherent limitations of human and financial resources, as also that of the existing infrastrcture,and keeping in times with the idea of Public Private Partnerships (PPP), the GoMP mulled over thepossibility of setting up Service Centres of an entirely different nature.That there existed thousands of Common Service Centres (CSCs) that were promoted under a nationalprogramme was a fact. But the ground reality was that, not only in Madhya Pradesh but also in many otherstates, these centres which were expected to work on the principle of pay per service had become non-functional due to economic infeasibility – the volume of business [both G2C and B2C] some how did notmaterialize.Yet again in a path breaking move, the PSM department through its Deputy Secretary, decided to expand itssources for getting a good solution. A query was raised in the United Nations Solution Exchange Communityof Practice hosted in India. Based on a few answers that were provided, and having committed to have anational consultation on accountability and guarantee mechanisms in public service delivery, the GoMPproposed that Lok Sewa Kendras (Public Service Centres) be initiated on a PPP mode in 400 places inMadhya Pradesh. 30

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