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Tarea sociales en_power_point_ojo_tarea_terminada[1]
 

Tarea sociales en_power_point_ojo_tarea_terminada[1]

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    Tarea sociales en_power_point_ojo_tarea_terminada[1] Tarea sociales en_power_point_ojo_tarea_terminada[1] Presentation Transcript

    •  
    • ll. The West’s First Outreached: Maritime Power   a. Europeans in the middle ages were used to Asian goods, attempts to get involved in world trade system were limited because of their fear of the Atlantic ocean and the Ottoman Empire. When gold declined in Europeans made efforts to discover trade routes. They colonized islands of the Atlantic coast of Africa, but still technology didn’t allow them to cross the Ocean. Concepts: 1. Middle Ages:Europian history,5 th century,16 th century. 2. World Trade System: international organization, trade. 3. Ottoman Empire: Modern Turkish,islamic empire Terms: 1. Technology: Technology is the process by which humans modify nature to meet their needs and wants. Most people, however, think of technology in terms of its artifacts: computers and software, aircraft,
    • pesticides, water-treatment plants, birth-control pills, and microwave ovens, to name a few.   B. New Technology: A key to the Power New inventions such as gunpowder, advanced metallurgy, compass, and new resistant ships made it easier for Europeans to navigate. Concepts: 1. Technological developments: computers and software, aircraft, pesticides, water-treatment plants, birth-control pills, and microwave ovens, to name a few. Terms: 1. Traffic: is when are many things in a way so they can not advance very fast
    •   2. Weapons: A weapon is a tool used to apply force for the purpose of causing harm or damage to persons, animals or structures. Weapons are used in hunting, attack, self-defense, or defense in combat and range from simple, prehistoric weapons like clubs and spears to complicated modern weapons such as intercontinental ballistic missiles.   3. Navigation: is the process of reading, and controlling the movement of a craft or vehicle from one place to another place.   Portugal and Spain Lead the Pack During the fifteen century Henry the Navigator began the first voyages of discovery along the Atlantic coast of Africa, they succeeded sailing around the Cape of Good Hope. In 1498 Vasco da Gama reached India. One expedition was blown to Brazil, and in order to protect their interests the Portuguese built forts along the Atlantic coast of Africa and India. In 1514 the Portuguese reached China and the Islands of Indonesia, in addition by 1542 they reached Japan. In 1492 Christopher Columbus sailed for the Spain, his explorations for a direct route to Asia led him to discover the Americas. Ferdinand Magellan sailed around the southern tip of South America into the Pacific leading him to reach Indonesia and to claim the Philippines for Spain.
    • In the sixteen century northern European became more involved in voyages of discovery. The French reached Canada in 1534, the English settle colonies along the Atlantic coast of North America. The Dutch also got involved and became rivals with the Portuguese. They displaced the Portuguese from Indonesia, and established small way stations along the southern tip of Africa. For British and Dutch explorations and colonization’s private companies played an important role. The Dutch East Indian Company and the British East Indian Company receive monopolies from their respective governments. Concepts: 1. Commercial Interest: 2. Explorations: Cristobal Colon, Simon Bolivar, Napoleon, Americo Vespucio. 3. Trade network: exchange, comers 4. Monopolies: economics, product, service
    • Terms: 1. Discovery observations are acts in which something is found and given a productive insight. Serendipity is the effect by which one accidentally discovers something fortunate, especially while looking for something else entirely. Trade: is the voluntary exchange of goods, services, or both. Trade is also called commerce or transaction. A mechanism that allows trade is called a market. : 2. Waterways: rivers that the water haves speed in the same direction 3. Governments: it’s a community , political identity or organization that has the authority of enforce rules.     Toward a World Economy Introduction Europeans created a exchange in goods creating an international exchange and a new world-wide economy. Concepts: 1. International exchange: trading, products, gold, selling ,buying ,navigation, comers.
    • Terms: Colonies: In politics and in history, a colony is a territory under the immediate political control of a state. For colonies in antiquity, city-states would often found their own colonies. Some colonies were historically countries, while others were territories without definite statehood from their inception.   The “Colombian Exchange” of Disease and Food   One of the negative aspects of the new trade system was the diseases of Europe like the smallpox and measles, the period of a century and a half, , new world crops particularly corn and potatoes supported population growth in areas into the americans, which had previously lacked animal power   Concepts: 1.diseases: dead , smallpox and measles 2.growth: money, meat, selling, lands, farmers and food
    • The West’s Commercial Outreache   the ability of west to dominate the seas allowed western merchants to displace other from the world trade system. but transoceanic voyages profits from trade. Dominate at sea was the result of military and technological advances that made European navies more powerful than the fleetes of other civilization.   Initially, Europeans did not sizes much territory as part of their trading initiative, but limited their incursions to fortified trading .    
    •  
    • Imbalances in the world trade
      • Definitions
      • Commercial: people who are dedicated to selling products.
      • Construction: is the process of assembling anything, such as houses, bridges, and even boats.
    • Concept
      • World trade systems: navigation , international exchange , selling , buying, and commercial.
    • Idea
      • The earliest of the colonizers, Spain and Portugal, declined in the face of later competition from England, France, and Holland. The construction of core and dependent areas was critical the formation of the world trade system.
    • A system of international inequality
      • Merchants: the person who usually focuses on trade.
      • Structures: The set of resistance elements.
    • Concept
      • Plantation economies: selling , buying, and commercial.
    • Idea
      • Some areas of the Americas and Africa managed to remain outside the world trade system for centuries. In the Americas, the economy of Latin America, the Caribbean, and the southern British colonies relied on the importation of African slaves.
    • How much world in the world economy?
      • Economies: An economy is the ways in which people use their environment to meet their material needs.
      • Technological: based in scientific and industrial progress; "a technological civilization" scientific - conforming with the principles or methods used in science.
    • Concept
      • Internal system of exchange: international exchange , selling , buying, and commercial.
    • Idea
      • Huge areas of the world remained outside the trade system and retained indigenous economies with little incentive for rapid technological change or consumption of manufactured products. Japan initially showed some interest in trade with Europe, but quickly reversed course.
    • The Expansionist Trend
      • Incorporation: consolidating two or more things
      • Manufacturing: the act of making something from raw materials .
    • Concept
      • India Companies: selling , buying, and commercial.
    • Idea
      • Over time, the world trade system expanded. Areas of Southeast Asia and India were brought into the system on a more complete basis in the eighteenth century. Eastern Europe was drawn into the western European market system as a supplier of grain to feed the growing cities of the West. In return, Western manufactured goods began to infiltrate eastern Europe.
    • Colonial Expansion
      • Introduction
      • Dominance: the state that exists when one person or group has power over another.
      • Creating: to cause to come into existence.
    • Concept
      • World trade system: navigation , international exchange , selling , buying, and commercial.
    • Idea
      • Western leaders fostered colonialism as a means of creating controlled markets for manufactured goods.
    • Americas: Loosely Controlled Colonies
      • Conquering: To defeat or subdue by force, especially by force of arms.
      • Settlements: the establishment of a new region; colonization.
    • Concept
      • Agricultural settlements: international exchange , selling , buying, build.
    • Idea
      • Colonization in the Americas, where Europeans enjoyed enormous technological advantages, was particularly attractive. The Spanish seizure of lands in the New World began with the Caribbean islands, then moved to the Central American mainland in 1509. As agricultural settlements were made, more formal administrative structures were put in place.
    • plantation was an early method of colonization in which settlers were "planted" abroad in order to establish a permanent or semi-permanent colonial base. such plantations were also frequently intended to promote western culture and chistrianity among nearby indigenous peoples , as can be seen both in james i 's irish plantations, and in the early east-coast plantations in america (such as that at roanoke ). although the term "planter" to refer to a settler first appears as early as the 16th-century, the earliest true colonial plantation is usually agreed to be that of the plantations of ireland .
    • Plantation Economies:
      • A plantation economy is an economy which is based on agricultural mass production, usually of a few staple products grown on large farms called plantations . Plantation economies rely on the export of cash crops as a source of income. Prominent plantation crops have included cotton , rubber , sugar cane , tobacco , figs , rice , kapok , sisal and indigo
    • plantation was an early method of colonization in which settlers were "planted" abroad in order to establish a permanent or semi-permanent colonial base. such plantations were also frequently intended to promote western culture and chistrianity among nearby indigenous peoples , as can be seen both in james i 's irish plantations, and in the early east-coast plantations in america (such as that at roanoke ). although the term "planter" to refer to a settler first appears as early as the 16th-century, the earliest true colonial plantation is usually agreed to be that of the plantations of ireland .
    • Plantation Economies:
      • A plantation economy is an economy which is based on agricultural mass production, usually of a few staple products grown on large farms called plantations . Plantation economies rely on the export of cash crops as a source of income. Prominent plantation crops have included cotton , rubber , sugar cane , tobacco , figs , rice , kapok , sisal and indigo
    • To European models of government, religion, and political theory:
      • is the way in which the political power is structured to use the authority in the state,
    • International trade
      • is exchange of capital , goods , and services across international borders or territories. [1] It refers to exports of goods and services by a firm to a foreign-based buyer (importer) [2] In most countries, it represents a significant share of gross domestic product (GDP). While international trade has been present throughout much of history (see Silk Road , Amber Road ), its economic, social, and political importance has been on the rise in recent centuries
    • European intellectual movements
      • Humanism, the Scientific Revolution, the Enlightenment and Romaniticism all helped shape societies in Western Euope, as well as the world at large.
    • European world .
      • is the only independent Europe -wide policy journal, produced in association with over 130 leading European PEOPLE
    • atlantic colonies.
      • is the same colonies of europa but doesn’t import to the world
    • imported african slaves
      • is the prcess to import a person with to one dtste to to othe to put to work with aut pay and mistreating him
    • western culture .
      • is european civilization
    • aristocracy
      • government in which she only has the power mas the remarkable people of the state people privileged by the social organization or favored by the nature or the fortune
    • the seven years' war.
      • the seven years' war was a major military conflict that lasted from 1756, as a result of the french and indian war that erupted in north america in 1754, until the conclusion of the treaties of hubertusburg and paris in 1763. it involved all of the major european powers of the period.
    • east india company.
      • the east india company had the unusual distinction of ruling an entire country. its origins were much humbler. on 31 december 1600, a group of merchants who had incorporated themselves into the east india company were given monopoly privileges on all trade with the east indies. the company's ships first arrived in india, at the port of surat, in 1608. sir thomas roe reached the court of the mughal emperor, jahangir, as the emissary of king james i in 1615, and gained for the british the right to establish a factory at surat.
    • indigenous rulers.
      • an ethnohistory of town government in colonial cuernavaca
    • economic dependency .
      • when the costs and/or revenues of one project depend on those of another.
    • government administrators,
      • the administrator is required to take an oath similar to the governor-general and may exercise all of the powers of the governor-general.
    • military units,
      • a military organization is a way of structuring the armed forces of a state so as to offer military capability required by the national defence
    • population
      • population history is the study of changes in the size and structure of the human population in the past; how those changes have been determined by social, cultural, and economic forces; and how they have shaped human experience.
    •    colonial possessions .
      • after columbus showed that you could get somewhere by sailing across the atlantic (1492-1493) and vasco da gama sailed around the cape of good hope all the way to india (1497-1498), it was clear that european sailing technology was ready to go anywhere in the world. in 1493, spain and portugal got pope alexander vi to literally divide the world between them, a settlement adjusted slightly in the treaty of tordesillas in 1494. this basically gave the western hemisphere to spain and the eastern to portugal. for the next century, this is pretty much how things operated, and both spanish and portuguese denied that other european powers had the right to have ships in "their" waters. the english, french, dutch, etc. ran of the risk of being treated like pirates, even when they weren't.
    • Ideas
        • the colonies that more fully adopted western institutions and culture were located in british and french north america
      • . Atlantic colonists remained abreast of European intellectual movements, such as the Enlightenment. As a whole, the colonists thought of themselves as part of the European world.
      • European immigration produced a corresponding Indian emigration to the plains, Interaction with African culture was a characteristic that separated the colonies from the culture of the mother countries
      • . As the frontiers moved westward, household formation and family patterns more closely approximated the European norms. Even in rebellion, colonists after 1776 couched their resistance in European political theories
      • Canada was originally founded as a French colony, but the region was ceded to the British in the Treaty of Paris of 1763
      • Economic equality was greater in the colonies than in Europe, and there was no formal aristocracy
      • Dutch settlers fanning out from the trade station created the Cape Colony. Their expansion brought them into conflict with indigenous peoples such as the Bantus
      • After 1700 Britain and France began to contest control of the potentially valuable trade with India.
      • In this conflict, the British emerged as winners and expelled the French from India. British military influence soon extended to the island of Ceylon, as well.
      • In Africa and Asia, Western colonial penetration affected civilizations, but did not attempt to Europeanize them
      • Latin America, Africa, the southern colonies of the American coast, and some other regions were drawn into a system that condemned them to an inferior, dependent status. The global economy created new and more extensive links among civilizations
    • To European models of government, religion, and political theory:
      • is the way in which the political power is structured to use the authority in the state,
    • International trade
      • is exchange of capital , goods , and services across international borders or territories. [1] It refers to exports of goods and services by a firm to a foreign-based buyer (importer) [2] In most countries, it represents a significant share of gross domestic product (GDP). While international trade has been present throughout much of history (see Silk Road , Amber Road ), its economic, social, and political importance has been on the rise in recent centuries
    • European intellectual movements
      • Humanism, the Scientific Revolution, the Enlightenment and Romaniticism all helped shape societies in Western Euope, as well as the world at large.
    • European world .
      • is the only independent Europe -wide policy journal, produced in association with over 130 leading European PEOPLE
    • atlantic colonies.
      • is the same colonies of europa but doesn’t import to the world
    • imported african slaves
      • is the prcess to import a person with to one dtste to to othe to put to work with aut pay and mistreating him
    • western culture .
      • is european civilization
    • aristocracy
      • government in which she only has the power mas the remarkable people of the state people privileged by the social organization or favored by the nature or the fortune
    • the seven years' war.
      • the seven years' war was a major military conflict that lasted from 1756, as a result of the french and indian war that erupted in north america in 1754, until the conclusion of the treaties of hubertusburg and paris in 1763. it involved all of the major european powers of the period.
    • east india company.
      • the east india company had the unusual distinction of ruling an entire country. its origins were much humbler. on 31 december 1600, a group of merchants who had incorporated themselves into the east india company were given monopoly privileges on all trade with the east indies. the company's ships first arrived in india, at the port of surat, in 1608. sir thomas roe reached the court of the mughal emperor, jahangir, as the emissary of king james i in 1615, and gained for the british the right to establish a factory at surat.
    • indigenous rulers.
      • an ethnohistory of town government in colonial cuernavaca
    • economic dependency .
      • when the costs and/or revenues of one project depend on those of another.
    • government administrators,
      • the administrator is required to take an oath similar to the governor-general and may exercise all of the powers of the governor-general.
    • military units,
      • a military organization is a way of structuring the armed forces of a state so as to offer military capability required by the national defence
    • population
      • population history is the study of changes in the size and structure of the human population in the past; how those changes have been determined by social, cultural, and economic forces; and how they have shaped human experience.
    •    colonial possessions .
      • after columbus showed that you could get somewhere by sailing across the atlantic (1492-1493) and vasco da gama sailed around the cape of good hope all the way to india (1497-1498), it was clear that european sailing technology was ready to go anywhere in the world. in 1493, spain and portugal got pope alexander vi to literally divide the world between them, a settlement adjusted slightly in the treaty of tordesillas in 1494. this basically gave the western hemisphere to spain and the eastern to portugal. for the next century, this is pretty much how things operated, and both spanish and portuguese denied that other european powers had the right to have ships in "their" waters. the english, french, dutch, etc. ran of the risk of being treated like pirates, even when they weren't.
    • Ideas
        • the colonies that more fully adopted western institutions and culture were located in british and french north america
      • . Atlantic colonists remained abreast of European intellectual movements, such as the Enlightenment. As a whole, the colonists thought of themselves as part of the European world.
      • European immigration produced a corresponding Indian emigration to the plains, Interaction with African culture was a characteristic that separated the colonies from the culture of the mother countries
      • . As the frontiers moved westward, household formation and family patterns more closely approximated the European norms. Even in rebellion, colonists after 1776 couched their resistance in European political theories
      • Canada was originally founded as a French colony, but the region was ceded to the British in the Treaty of Paris of 1763
      • Economic equality was greater in the colonies than in Europe, and there was no formal aristocracy
      • Dutch settlers fanning out from the trade station created the Cape Colony. Their expansion brought them into conflict with indigenous peoples such as the Bantus
      • After 1700 Britain and France began to contest control of the potentially valuable trade with India.
      • In this conflict, the British emerged as winners and expelled the French from India. British military influence soon extended to the island of Ceylon, as well.
      • In Africa and Asia, Western colonial penetration affected civilizations, but did not attempt to Europeanize them
      • Latin America, Africa, the southern colonies of the American coast, and some other regions were drawn into a system that condemned them to an inferior, dependent status. The global economy created new and more extensive links among civilizations