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Animal Study Jason

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  • 1. Spotted Dolphin
    By Jason Shinn
  • 2. Habitat
    Spotted dolphins live in schools that can have up to one-hundred members. Spotted dolphins live in warm seas.
  • 3. Habitat 2
    Spotted dolphins are often seen with other dolphins.
  • 4. Diet
    Spotted dolphin eat fish , squid and crabs. Nursing females tend to eat more squid.
  • 5. Diet 2
    Females tend to eat more fish.
  • 6. Interesting facts
    Spotted dolphins send out a sound called echolocation. (Humans can’t hear it.)
  • 7. Appearance
    Humans swim slowly because they have hair on their bodies. Spotted dolphins barely have hair so they swim fast.
  • 8. Appearance 2
    Spotted dolphins’ name come from their spots. When spotted dolphins are born they have no spots.
  • 9. Appearance 3
    Spotted dolphin have a white tipped beak. Spotted dolphins have a gray back.
  • 10. Appearance 4
    Spotted dolphins also have a thin, long beak.
  • 11. Life cycle
    Mating season is year round for spotted dolphins. Female spotted dolphins have 2 to 3 years for breeding.
  • 12. Conservation
    Spotted dolphins are endangered because fishermen accidentally catch spotted dolphins instead of fish. Some people really try hard to save spotted dolphins.
  • 13. Conservation 2
    Yellow fin tuna and spotted dolphins travel together. Now fishermen practice dolphin safe fishing.
  • 14. Prevost, spotted dolphins,1996
    Murray, spotted dolphins, 2003
    www.arkive.org/
    www.nationalgeographic.com
    Where I got the facts