Juniper mpls best practice part 2

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Juniper mpls lab

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  • 1. Juniper MPLS Best Practice Part 2 Configuring LDP, RSVP-Signalled LSP, LDP Tunneling, and LSP routing table integration Febrian Setiadi
  • 2. MPLS overview (cont’d)
    • Label-switched Path  The predetermined paths that make MPLS works, this is unidirectional path through the networks
    • Label Switching routers
      • Ingress : an entry point of an LSP
      • Transit : any router in the middle of LSP
      • Penultimate : The second-to-last router in the LSP
      • Egress : an exit point for the LSP
    • LSP Signalling Protocols
      • RSVP
        • Well-known signaling protocol, which is extended to support Traffic- Eng
        • Supports explicit paths and bandwidth reservation
        • Label allocated only along the defined LSP path
      • LDP
        • Uses the same shortest-path as IGP for forwarding
        • Label allocated and exchanged between neighbors
    • LDP Tunnelling
      • Permits establishments of and LDP session across an RSVP network by tunneling the LDP traffic within RSVP-based LSPs.
  • 3. Lab Topology
  • 4. LDP Configuration 1. Configure the interface to support the MPLS family btm@lab:Batam> show configuration interfaces em1 { unit 7 { vlan-id 7; family inet { address 10.0.7.1/30; } family mpls; } unit 10 { vlan-id 10; family inet { address 10.0.10.1/30; } family mpls; } unit 90 { vlan-id 90; family inet { address 10.0.90.1/30; } family mpls; } unit 100 { vlan-id 100; family inet { address 100.100.100.1/30; } } }
  • 5. LDP Configuration 2. Enable MPLS protocol on the interface 3. Turn on LDP as the signalling Protocol 4. On the transit and egress routers, turn on MPLS and LDP in a similar fashion, e.g : Semarang btm@lab:Batam> show configuration protocols mpls { interface all; } btm@lab:Batam> show configuration protocols ldp { interface all; } smg@lab:Semarang> show configuration interfaces em1 { unit 0 { vlan-id 0; family inet { address 10.0.0.1/30; } family mpls; } unit 3 { vlan-id 3; family inet { address 10.0.3.1/30; } family mpls; } em2 { unit 1 { vlan-id 1; family inet { address 10.0.1.2/30; } family mpls; } unit 7 { vlan-id 7; family inet { address 10.0.7.2/30; } family mpls; } }
  • 6. LDP Configuration
    • Once LDP is turned on on all the routers, the protocol automatically builds multipoint-to-point LSPs, each ending on a different router in the network.
    btm@lab:Batam> show ldp interface Interface Label space ID Nbr count Next hello lo0.4 192.168.4.1:0 1 0 em1.7 192.168.4.1:0 1 4 em1.10 192.168.4.1:0 1 2 em1.90 192.168.4.1:0 1 1 smg@lab:Semarang> show ldp interface Interface Label space ID Nbr count Next hello em1.0 192.168.16.1:0 1 1 em1.3 192.168.16.1:0 1 0 em1.11 192.168.16.1:0 1 4 em2.1 192.168.16.1:0 1 0 em2.7 192.168.16.1:0 1 3 lo0.16 192.168.16.1:0 0 0
  • 7. LDP Configuration
    • You see that each LDP interface is operational and has learned about one neighbor.
    btm@lab:Batam> show ldp session Address State Connection Hold time 192.168.8.1 Operational Open 20 192.168.16.1 Operational Open 20 192.168.20.1 Operational Open 20 smg@lab:Semarang> show ldp session Address State Connection Hold time 192.168.4.1 Operational Open 27 192.168.8.1 Operational Open 27 192.168.12.1 Operational Open 27 192.168.24.1 Operational Open 27 192.168.36.1 Operational Open 27
  • 8. LDP Configuration
    • Use the detail form of this command to see the session parameters: (omitted)
    jkt@lab:Jakarta> show ldp session detail Address: 192.168.4.1, State: Operational, Connection: Open, Hold time: 21 Session ID: 192.168.8.1:0--192.168.4.1:0 Next keepalive in 1 seconds Active, Maximum PDU: 4096, Hold time: 30, Neighbor count: 1 Neighbor types: discovered Keepalive interval: 10, Connect retry interval: 1 Local address: 192.168.8.1, Remote address: 192.168.4.1 Up for 05:31:12 Local - Restart: disabled, Helper mode: enabled Remote - Restart: disabled, Helper mode: enabled Local maximum recovery time: 240000 msec Nonstop routing state: Not in sync Next-hop addresses received: 10.0.7.1 10.0.10.1 10.0.90.1 192.168.4.1 100.100.100.1
  • 9. RSVP Configuration
    • We’ll setup RSVP from Batam to Ambon
  • 10. RSVP Configuration 1. Configure the interface to support the MPLS family btm@lab:Batam> show configuration interfaces em1 { unit 7 { vlan-id 7; family inet { address 10.0.7.1/30; } family mpls; } unit 10 { vlan-id 10; family inet { address 10.0.10.1/30; } family mpls; } unit 90 { vlan-id 90; family inet { address 10.0.90.1/30; } family mpls; } unit 100 { vlan-id 100; family inet { address 100.100.100.1/30; } } }
  • 11. RSVP Configuration 2. Turn on RSVP as the signalling protocol 3. On the transit and egress routers, turn on MPLS and RSVP in a similar fashion. e.g : Surabaya as the Egress Router btm@lab:Batam> show configuration protocols rsvp { interface all; } sby@lab:Surabaya> show configuration protocols rsvp { interface all; } mpls { interface all; }
  • 12. RSVP Configuration 4. Finally set up a return LSP from Ingress to Egress so that the LSP is bidirectional and traffic can travel from the egress router back to the ingress router: 5. Use show mpls lsp command to confirm configuration on Ingress, Transit, and Egress router. btm@lab:Batam> show configuration protocols mpls label-switched-path Batam-to-Ambon { to 192.168.48.1; no-cspf; } btm@lab:Batam> show mpls lsp ingress Ingress LSP: 1 sessions To From State Rt ActivePath P LSPname 192.168.48.1 192.168.4.1 Up 0 * Batam-to-Ambon Total 1 displayed, Up 1, Down 0 smg@lab:Semarang> show mpls lsp transit Transit LSP: 1 sessions To From State Rt Style Labelin Labelout LSPname 192.168.48.1 192.168.4.1 Up 1 1 FF 100288 100288 Batam-to-Ambon Total 1 displayed, Up 1, Down 0 sby@lab:Surabaya> show mpls lsp transit Transit LSP: 1 sessions To From State Rt Style Labelin Labelout LSPname 192.168.48.1 192.168.4.1 Up 1 1 FF 100288 3 Batam-to-Ambon Total 1 displayed, Up 1, Down 0 amb@lab:Ambon> show mpls lsp egress Egress LSP: 1 sessions To From State Rt Style Labelin Labelout LSPname 192.168.48.1 192.168.4.1 Up 0 1 FF 3 - Batam-to-Ambon Total 1 displayed, Up 1, Down 0
  • 13. RSVP Configuration
    • Installing LSPs into the Unicast Routing Table ( inet.0 )
      • Before
    • Use traffic-engineering bgp-igp or installing additional prefixes per LSP with install prefix active
    btm@lab:Batam> show route 192.168.48.1 inet.0: 37 destinations, 37 routes (36 active, 0 holddown, 1 hidden) + = Active Route, - = Last Active, * = Both 192.168.48.1/32 *[OSPF/10] 00:00:53, metric 3 > to 10.0.7.2 via em1.7 to 10.0.10.2 via em1.10 inet.3: 11 destinations, 13 routes (10 active, 0 holddown, 2 hidden) + = Active Route, - = Last Active, * = Both 192.168.48.1/32 *[RSVP/7] 00:00:08, metric 3 > to 10.0.10.2 via em1.10, label-switched-path Batam-to-Ambon [LDP/9] 00:00:07, metric 1 > to 10.0.10.2 via em1.10, label-switched-path Batam-to-Ambon btm@lab:Batam> show configuration protocols mpls traffic-engineering bgp-igp ; label-switched-path Batam-to-Ambon { to 192.168.48.1; no-cspf; }
  • 14. RSVP Configuration
    • After installing LSP into the Unicast Routing Table
    • While performs traceroute, mpls label will be appeared
    btm@lab:Batam> show route 192.168.48.1 inet.0: 37 destinations, 48 routes (36 active, 0 holddown, 1 hidden) + = Active Route, - = Last Active, * = Both 192.168.48.1/32 *[RSVP/7] 00:27:22, metric 3 > to 10.0.7.2 via em1.7, label-switched-path Batam-to-Ambon [LDP/9] 00:27:22, metric 1 > to 10.0.7.2 via em1.7, label-switched-path Batam-to-Ambon [OSPF/10] 00:27:27, metric 3 > to 10.0.7.2 via em1.7 to 10.0.10.2 via em1.10 btm@lab:Batam> traceroute 192.168.48.1 traceroute to 192.168.48.1 (192.168.48.1), 30 hops max, 40 byte packets 1 SMG (10.0.7.2) 2.153 ms 0.703 ms 0.798 ms MPLS Label= 100320 CoS=0 TTL=1 S=1 2 SBY (10.0.0.2) 1.048 ms 0.995 ms 1.007 ms MPLS Label= 100320 CoS=0 TTL=1 S=1 3 AMB (192.168.48.1) 1.377 ms 1.401 ms 1.442 ms
  • 15. Placing Routing constraints on RSVP
    • Using Bandwidth Reservation
    • Using Named-Path
    • Using Explicit Route Object
      • Strict : Must be directly attached to previous hop
      • Loose : Not always be adjacencied
    • Allowing IGP traffic to use an LSP
      • As a next-hop in static route
      • Configure OSPF or IS-IS so that the LSP is advertised into the IGP
  • 16. Placing Routing constraints on RSVP
    • Using Bandwidth Reservation
    • Verifying bandwidth on an LSP
    btm@lab:Batam> show configuration protocols mpls traffic-engineering bgp-igp; label-switched-path Batam-to-Ambon { to 192.168.48.1; ldp-tunneling; bandwidth 500m ; no-cspf; } btm@lab:Batam> show rsvp interface RSVP interface: 4 active Active Subscr- Static Available Reserved Highwater Interface State resv iption BW BW BW mark em1.7 Up 1 100% 1000Mbps 500Mbps 500Mbps 500Mbps em1.90 Up 0 100% 1000Mbps 1000Mbps 0bps 500Mbps smg@lab:Semarang> show rsvp interface RSVP interface: 5 active Active Subscr- Static Available Reserved Highwater Interface State resv iption BW BW BW mark em1.0 Up 1 100% 1000Mbps 500Mbps 500Mbps 500Mbps em1.11 Up 0 100% 1000Mbps 1000Mbps 0bps 0bps em2.1 Up 0 100% 1000Mbps 1000Mbps 0bps 500Mbps sby@lab:Surabaya> show rsvp interface RSVP interface: 5 active Active Subscr- Static Available Reserved Highwater Interface State resv iption BW BW BW mark em1.8 Up 1 100% 1000Mbps 500Mbps 500Mbps 500Mbps em1.9 Up 0 100% 1000Mbps 1000Mbps 0bps 0bps em2.0 Up 0 100% 1000Mbps 1000Mbps 0bps 500Mbps
  • 17. Using naming path with ERO
    • We’ll setup Primary and Secondary path from Batam to Ambon
      • Path Shortest  this will be the Secondary
      • Will traverse along Batam – Semarang – Surabaya – Ambon
  • 18. Using naming path with ERO
      • Path Furthest  this will be the Primary
      • Will traverse along Furthest Path :
      • Batam – Jakarta – Bandung – Denpasar – Surabaya – Semarang – Banjarmasin – Pontianak – Balikpapan – Ambon
  • 19. Using naming path with ERO
      • Defining path Shortest :
    btm@lab:Batam> show configuration protocols mpls traffic-engineering bgp-igp; label-switched-path Batam-to-Ambon { to 192.168.48.1; bandwidth 500m; no-cspf; } path Shortest { 192.168.16.1 loose; // Semarang 192.168.36.1 loose; // Surabaya }
  • 20. Using naming path with ERO
      • Defining path Furthest :
    btm@lab:Batam> show configuration protocols mpls path Furthest { 10.0.90.2 strict; // Jakarta 10.0.80.2 strict; // Bandung 10.0.70.2 strict; // Denpasar 10.0.60.2 strict; // Makasar 10.0.9.1 strict; // Surabaya 10.0.0.1 strict; // Semarang 10.0.1.1 strict; // Banjarmasin 10.0.5.1 strict; // Pontianak 10.0.20.2 strict; // Balikpapan 10.0.30.2 strict; // Ambon }
  • 21. Using naming path with ERO
      • Named Path configuration
    btm@lab:Batam> show configuration protocols mpls label-switched-path Batam-to-Ambon { to 192.168.48.1; bandwidth 500m; no-cspf; primary Furthest; secondary Shortest; } path Shortest { 192.168.16.1 loose; 192.168.36.1 loose; } path Furthest { 10.0.90.2 strict; 10.0.80.2 strict; 10.0.70.2 strict; 10.0.60.2 strict; 10.0.9.1 strict; 10.0.0.1 strict; 10.0.1.1 strict; 10.0.5.1 strict; 10.0.20.2 strict; 10.0.30.2 strict; }
  • 22. Using naming path with ERO
      • Traceroute result
    btm@lab:Batam> traceroute 192.168.48.1 traceroute to 192.168.48.1 (192.168.48.1), 30 hops max, 40 byte packets 1 JKT (10.0.90.2) 0.758 ms 0.827 ms 0.510 ms MPLS Label=100368 CoS=0 TTL=1 S=1 2 BDG (10.0.80.2) 1.042 ms 1.521 ms 0.965 ms MPLS Label=100208 CoS=0 TTL=1 S=1 3 DPS (10.0.70.2) 1.523 ms 1.341 ms 1.459 ms MPLS Label=100192 CoS=0 TTL=1 S=1 4 MKS (10.0.60.2) 1.771 ms 2.494 ms 4.011 ms MPLS Label=100192 CoS=0 TTL=1 S=1 5 SBY (10.0.9.1) 1.605 ms 2.153 ms 1.700 ms MPLS Label=100336 CoS=0 TTL=1 S=1 6 SMG (10.0.0.1) 1.749 ms 1.795 ms 1.783 ms MPLS Label=100336 CoS=0 TTL=1 S=1 7 BJM (10.0.1.1) 3.818 ms 2.259 ms 5.182 ms MPLS Label=100192 CoS=0 TTL=1 S=1 8 PON (10.0.5.1) 2.363 ms 2.252 ms 2.221 ms MPLS Label=100448 CoS=0 TTL=1 S=1 9 BPP (10.0.20.2) 3.291 ms 3.385 ms 4.967 ms MPLS Label=100320 CoS=0 TTL=1 S=1 10 AMB (192.168.48.1) 4.495 ms 4.450 ms 4.498 ms
  • 23. Allowing IGP traffic to use an LSP
      • As a next-hop in static route
      • After we created LSP, next task is to make sure that all traffic destined to Ambon travels through the LSP we have created. We have to specify all LSP bound-traffic use the LSP as the next-hop and allow all forwarding decisions.
    btm@lab:Batam> show configuration routing-options static { route 192.168.48.1/32 { lsp-next-hop Batam-to-Ambon; } } btm@lab:Batam> show route 192.168.48.1 inet.0: 37 destinations, 49 routes (36 active, 0 holddown, 1 hidden) + = Active Route, - = Last Active, * = Both 192.168.48.1/32 *[Static/5] 00:00:11 > to 10.0.90.2 via em1.90, label-switched-path Batam-to-Ambon
  • 24. Allowing IGP traffic to use an LSP
      • Configure OSPF or IS-IS so that the LSP is advertised into the IGP
      • We want to configure OSPF so they can also use the LSPs on the ingress router.
    btm@lab:Batam> show configuration protocols ospf area 0.0.0.0 { interface all; interface em1.100 { disable; } label-switched-path Batam-to-Ambon; } btm@lab:Batam> show route 192.168.48.1 inet.0: 37 destinations, 49 routes (36 active, 0 holddown, 1 hidden) + = Active Route, - = Last Active, * = Both 192.168.48.1/32 *[Static/5] 00:03:04 > to 10.0.90.2 via em1.90, label-switched-path Batam-to-Ambon [OSPF/10] 00:00:06, metric 1 > to 10.0.90.2 via em1.90, label-switched-path Batam-to-Ambon
  • 25. Label Stacking : LDP Tunneling
      • We’ll use LDP through an RSVP network
      • JuOS software permits the establishment of an LDP session across an RSVP network by tunneling the LDP traffic within RSVP-based LSPs
      • It requires 2 RSVP signaled LSP to exist between the LDP neighbors  one in each direction
  • 26. Label Stacking : LDP Tunneling
      • Current LDP session on Batam
      • Current LDP session on Ambon
    btm@lab:Batam> show ldp session Address State Connection Hold time 192.168.8.1 Operational Open 29 192.168.16.1 Operational Open 29 192.168.20.1 Operational Open 29 amb@lab:Ambon> show ldp session Address State Connection Hold time 192.168.32.1 Operational Open 23 192.168.36.1 Operational Open 23 192.168.44.1 Operational Open 23
  • 27. Label Stacking : LDP Tunneling
      • Enabling LDP Tunneling on Batam’s LSP
      • Enabling LDP Tunneling on Ambon’s LSP
    btm@lab:Batam> show configuration protocols mpls label-switched-path Batam-to-Ambon { to 192.168.48.1; ldp-tunneling; bandwidth 500m; no-cspf; primary Furthest; secondary Shortest; } amb@lab:Ambon> show configuration protocols mpls label-switched-path Ambon-to-Batam { to 192.168.4.1; ldp-tunneling; no-cspf; }
  • 28. Label Stacking : LDP Tunneling
      • After LDP Tunneling configured on Batam
      • After LDP Tunneling configured on Ambon
      • At this point, the LDP neighbor relationship is formed and the routers exchange LDP initialization messages, as displayed on LDP session at each routers.
    btm@lab:Batam> show ldp session Address State Connection Hold time 192.168.8.1 Operational Open 20 192.168.16.1 Operational Open 20 192.168.20.1 Operational Open 20 192.168.48.1 Operational Open 26 amb@lab:Ambon> show ldp session Address State Connection Hold time 192.168.4.1 Operational Open 25 192.168.32.1 Operational Open 24 192.168.36.1 Operational Open 25 192.168.44.1 Operational Open 23
  • 29. LSP and Routing Table Integration
      • Mapping BGP next-hops to LSPs
        • Routes associated with signaled LSPs are installed in the inet.3 routing table
          • Only BGP can view the contents of inet.3
          • BGP tries to resolve its next hop through LSPs in the inet.3
        • BGP installs an LSP as the physical next-hop for transit destinations
          • Internal destinations aren’t associated with a BGP next-hop and therefore don’t LSPs by default
        • BGP first look in inet.3 table when attempting to resolve the BGP next-hop associated with given prefix
      • We’ll demonstrate how BGP install next-hop from inet.3 table
  • 30. LSP and Routing Table Integration
      • Route Resolution Example
  • 31. LSP and Routing Table Integration
      • We begin by examining how traffic is forwarded to the 118.96.0/16 from the perspective of ASN 17974
      • 118.96.0/16 is being learned by Ambon router through EBGP session to Hongkong, Jakarta router then learns about 118.96.0/16 through its IBGP session to Ambon, Jakarta installs prefix 118.96.0/16 then readvertises it to the Singapore router, using EBGP session.
      • In this example. Routers in Singapore begin sending traffic to 118.96.0/16 prefixes through Batam, when this transit traffic arrives at the Batam router, it must decide how to forward this transit traffic to 118.98.0/16
  • 32. LSP and Routing Table Integration
      • BGP configuration in Batam
      • BGP configuration in Ambon
    btm@lab:Batam> show configuration protocols bgp group EBGP-to-SG { type external; local-address 100.100.100.1; peer-as 4657; local-as 7713; neighbor 100.100.100.2; } group IBGP { type internal; local-address 192.168.4.1; neighbor 192.168.48.1; } amb@lab:Ambon> show configuration protocols bgp group EBGP-to-HK { type external; local-address 200.200.200.1; peer-as 38154; local-as 7713; neighbor 200.200.200.2; } group IBGP { type internal; local-address 192.168.48.1; neighbor 192.168.4.1; }
  • 33. LSP and Routing Table Integration
      • Advertisement from Ambon
    amb@lab:Ambon> show bgp summary Groups: 2 Peers: 2 Down peers: 0 Table Tot Paths Act Paths Suppressed History Damp State Pending inet.0 1 1 0 0 0 0 Peer AS InPkt OutPkt OutQ Flaps Last Up/Dwn State|#Active/Received/Damped... 192.168.4.1 7713 647 655 0 2 4:16:08 0/0/0 0/0/0 200.200.200.2 38154 664 659 0 0 4:56:03 1/1/0 amb@lab:Ambon> show route receive-protocol bgp 200.200.200.2 inet.0: 37 destinations, 48 routes (37 active, 0 holddown, 0 hidden) Prefix Nexthop MED Lclpref AS path * 118.96.0.0/16 200.200.200.2 38154 I inet.3: 2 destinations, 2 routes (0 active, 0 holddown, 2 hidden) mpls.0: 16 destinations, 16 routes (16 active, 0 holddown, 0 hidden) amb@lab:Ambon> show route advertising-protocol bgp 192.168.4.1 inet.0: 37 destinations, 48 routes (37 active, 0 holddown, 0 hidden) Prefix Nexthop MED Lclpref AS path * 118.96.0.0/16 200.200.200.2 100 38154 I 0/0/0
  • 34. LSP and Routing Table Integration
      • What Batam sees
      • No route received, thus no BGP route installed, why?
    btm@lab:Batam> show bgp summary Groups: 2 Peers: 2 Down peers: 0 Table Tot Paths Act Paths Suppressed History Damp State Pending inet.0 1 0 0 0 0 0 Peer AS InPkt OutPkt OutQ Flaps Last Up/Dwn State|#Active/Received/Damped... 100.100.100.2 4657 576 579 0 2 4:18:34 0/0/0 0/0/0 192.168.48.1 7713 576 575 0 2 4:18:34 0/1/0 0/0/0 btm@lab:Batam> show route receive-protocol bgp 192.168.48.1 inet.0: 37 destinations, 49 routes (36 active, 0 holddown, 1 hidden) mpls.0: 16 destinations, 16 routes (16 active, 0 holddown, 0 hidden)
  • 35. LSP and Routing Table Integration
      • Unusable next-hop
      • Batam router can not resolve it’s next-hop (200.200.200.2)
    btm@lab:Batam> show route 118.96.0.0/16 all extensive inet.0: 37 destinations, 49 routes (36 active, 0 holddown, 1 hidden) 118.96.0.0/16 (1 entry, 0 announced) BGP Preference: 170/-101 Next hop type: Unusable Next-hop reference count: 1 State: <Hidden Int Ext> Local AS: 7713 Peer AS: 7713 Age: 4:20:12 Task: BGP_7713.192.168.48.1+51648 AS path: 38154 I Localpref: 100 Router ID: 192.168.48.1 Indirect next hops: 1 Protocol next hop: 200.200.200.2 Indirect next hop: 0 -
  • 36. LSP and Routing Table Integration
      • Typical solutions, by using next-hop self
      • Resolved, from Batam router, next-hop is 192.168.48.1
    amb@lab:Ambon> show configuration policy-options policy-statement nhs { then { next-hop self ; } } amb@lab:Ambon> show configuration protocols bgp group IBGP type internal; local-address 192.168.48.1; export nhs; neighbor 192.168.4.1; btm@lab:Batam> show route 118.96.0/16 inet.0: 37 destinations, 37 routes (37 active, 0 holddown, 0 hidden) + = Active Route, - = Last Active, * = Both 118.96.0.0/16 *[BGP/170] 00:04:09, localpref 100, from 192.168.48.1 AS path: 38154 I to 10.0.7.2 via em1.7 > to 10.0.10.2 via em1.10
  • 37. LSP and Routing Table Integration
      • LSP configured Batam-to-Ambon
      • Prefix 192.168.48.1 installed in inet.3, lowest preference wins, but BGP will use information in table inet.3
    btm@lab:Batam> show configuration protocols mpls label-switched-path Batam-to-Ambon { to 192.168.48.1 no-cspf; } btm@lab:Batam> show route 192.168.48.1 inet.0: 37 destinations, 37 routes (37 active, 0 holddown, 0 hidden) + = Active Route, - = Last Active, * = Both 192.168.48.1/32 *[OSPF/10] 00:00:05, metric 3 to 10.0.7.2 via em1.7 > to 10.0.10.2 via em1.10 inet.3: 1 destinations, 1 routes (1 active, 0 holddown, 0 hidden) + = Active Route, - = Last Active, * = Both 192.168.48.1/32 *[RSVP/7] 00:03:21, metric 3 > to 10.0.90.2 via em1.90, label-switched-path Batam-to-Ambon
  • 38. LSP and Routing Table Integration
      • BGP installs LSP as next-hop
      • The results of BGP next-hop resolution through the inet.3 table results in the Batam-to-Ambon LSP being installed as the forwarding next-hop for traffic associated with 118.96.0/16 prefix.
    btm@lab:Batam> show route 118.96.0.0/16 inet.0: 37 destinations, 37 routes (37 active, 0 holddown, 0 hidden) + = Active Route, - = Last Active, * = Both 118.96.0.0/16 *[BGP/170] 00:00:35, localpref 100, from 192.168.48.1 AS path: 38154 I > to 10.0.90.2 via em1.90, label-switched-path Batam-to-Ambon
  • 39. LSP and Routing Table Integration
      • What actually happened ?
    btm@lab:Batam> show route table inet.3 detail inet.3: 1 destinations, 1 routes (1 active, 0 holddown, 0 hidden) 192.168.48.1/32 (1 entry, 1 announced) State: <FlashAll> *RSVP Preference: 7 Next hop type: Router, Next hop index: 1058 Next-hop reference count: 7 Next hop: 10.0.90.2 via em1.90 weight 0x1, selected Label-switched-path Batam-to-Ambon Label operation: Push 100560 State: <Active Int> Local AS: 7713 Age: 6:26 Metric: 3 Task: RSVP Announcement bits (1): 3-Resolve tree 2 AS path: I
  • 40. LSP and Routing Table Integration
      • Ingress Resolves BGP next-hop
        • BGP performs recursive lookup to resolve BGP next hop
          • BGP also looks in the inet.3 MPLS routing table
          • BGP looks in the inet.0 IP routing table
          • BGP selects route with lowest preference
    btm@lab:Batam> show route 192.168.48.1 inet.0: 37 destinations, 37 routes (37 active, 0 holddown, 0 hidden) + = Active Route, - = Last Active, * = Both 192.168.48.1/32 *[OSPF/10] 00:16:38, metric 3 to 10.0.7.2 via em1.7 > to 10.0.10.2 via em1.10 inet.3: 1 destinations, 1 routes (1 active, 0 holddown, 0 hidden) + = Active Route, - = Last Active, * = Both 192.168.48.1/32 *[ RSVP/7] 00:11:29, metric 3 > to 10.0.90.2 via em1.90, label-switched-path Batam-to-Ambon
  • 41.