древняк
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древняк

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    древняк древняк Presentation Transcript

    •  
    • Houses
      • The Neolithic long house type was introduced with the first farmers of central and western Europe around 5000 BCE—7000 years ago.
      • The Germanic cattle farmer longhouses emerged along the southwestern North Sea coast in the third or fourth century BC and might be the ancestors of several medieval house types such as the Scandinavian langhus , the English, Welsh and Scottish longhouse variants and the German and Dutch Fachhallenhaus . The longhouse is a traditional way of shelter.
      • The medieval longhouse types of Europe of which some have survived are among others
      • The British ( Brythonic ) variants in Dartmoor and Wales the Tyddyn
      • The Scottish Longhouse, " Black house " or taighean dubha
    • The French longère or maison longue
    • contents :
      • Neolithic long house
      • Fachhallenhaus
      • The medieval longhouse
      • "Black house“
      • The French longère or maison longue
      • Home Additional information
      • In archaeology there are two European longhouse types of designs that are now extinct.
      • The Neolithic long house type was introduced with the first farmers of central and western Europe around 5000 BCE—7000 years ago.
      • The Germanic cattle farmer longhouses emerged along the southwestern North Sea coast in the third or fourth century BC and might be the ancestors of several medieval house types such as the Scandinavian langhus , the English Welsh and Scottish longhouse variants and the German and Dutch Fachhallenhaus . The longhouse is a traditional way of shelter.
      • The medieval longhouse types of Europe of which some have survived are among others:
      • The Scandinavian or Viking Långhus
      • The British ( Brythonic ) variants in Dartmoor and Wales the Tyddyn
      • The northwest England type in Cumbria
      • The Scottish Longhouse, " Black house " or taighean dubha
      • The old Frisian Langhuis that developed into the Frisian farmhouse which probably influenced the development of the Gulf house (German: Gulfhaus ), that spread along the North Sea coast to the east and north.
      • The French longère or maison longue (with different versions from different origins)
      • Round houses
      • The British Celts lived in roundhouses. We know this from the archaeological remains that have been excavated and dated to the Iron Age. The size of the roundhouses can be seen from the rain ditches which surround the houses. From those ditches we know that some of the roundhouses in the hill fort were quite big and that there was room for a lot of people inside.
      • The archaeological record for these roundhouses is incomplete due to the decomposition of organic materials and the removal and reuse of their contents elsewhere. However, Castell Henllys Iron Age Hill Fort probably provides the most authentic reconstruction of Iron Age roundhouses in Britain.
      • The structure and materials used
      • The roundhouses at Castell Henllys have been reconstructed using the archaeological evidence found at the site. Each of the upright poles which support the roof of the roundhouse have been placed into the original post holes. Archaeologists discovered that the walls of the houses were made of wattle and daub. The wattle walls were made by weaving a fence of pliable hazel or willow sticks into an extremely strong circular structure. The daub was made of a mixture of clay, straw and animal dung. The straw and dung help to stop the clay from cracking and falling away. The daubed walls were very good at keeping the heat in and the wind out. Lime-washed walls helped to create a better appearance and make the houses a little lighter.
      • Heating, lighting, cooking
      • It is quite dark inside the roundhouses with most of the light coming from the doorway during the day. In the centre of the roundhouses there were fireplaces. At night the flames from the fire provide some light but you still needed to get additional lighting from rush lights if you wanted to see things more clearly. It is more practical to use the daylight and get up at sunrise.
      • The fire would also have been used for cooking. There is evidence of a saddle quern-stone, which would have been used to grind corn* to make bread. There may have been an oven somewhere in the roundhouse (pictured - right)*. Sometimes food was cooked on hot stones placed next to the fire and it is quite likely that a cauldron would only have been used in one of the houses for communal cooking as it would have been a very costly item. A firedog may have been used to roast meat over the open fire
    • Thank you for attention