DRAFT INTERNATIONAL STANDARD ISO/DIS 22300                                      ISO/TC 223                             Sec...
ISO/DIS 22300                                                               PDF disclaimer     This PDF file may contain e...
ISO/DIS 22300Contents                                                                                                     ...
ISO/DIS 22300ForewordISO (the International Organization for Standardization) is a worldwide federation of national standa...
DRAFT INTERNATIONAL STANDARD                                                                             ISO/DIS 22300Soci...
ISO/DIS 22300NOTE 3      Risk is often characterized by reference to potential events, and consequences, or a combination ...
ISO/DIS 223002.1.13crisissituation with high level of uncertainty that disrupts the core activities and / or credibility o...
ISO/DIS 223002.2.5management systemset of interrelated or interacting elements of an organization to establish policies an...
ISO/DIS 22300NOTE      In the public sector a memorandum of understanding (MOU) can be used as the basis of a Mutual AidAg...
ISO/DIS 223002.2.23verificationconfirmation, through the provision of evidence, that specified requirements have been fulf...
ISO/DIS 223002.3.7trainingactivities designed to facilitate the learning and development of knowledge, skills, and abiliti...
ISO/DIS 22300NOTE        Observers play a crucial role in the debriefing and reporting process after an exercise. The term...
ISO/DIS 223002.4.15exercise annual plandocument in which the exercise policy plan has been translated to exercise goals, e...
ISO/DIS 223002.5.9protectionmeasures that enable an organization to reduce the impact of a potential disruption2.5.10recov...
ISO/DIS 22300                                           Bibliography[1] ISO 9000:2005 Quality Management Systems – Fundame...
DRAFT INTERNATIONAL STANDARD                                                        ISO/DIS 22300                         ...
ISO/DIS 22300stakeholder (admitted term)        2.1.2strategic exercise                 2.4.13static metadata             ...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Gestâo de Crises e Continuidade de Negócios: entenda a nova terminologia

4,785 views
4,632 views

Published on

Para que os amigos tenham uma melhor ideia da evolução dos trabalhos, estou apresentando abaixo, para discussão no Grupo Sucesso Sustentado, o texto na íntegra (em inglês, por enquanto) da versão DIS da futura ISO 22300 - Societal security - Vocabulary.

Published in: Business, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
4,785
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1,405
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Gestâo de Crises e Continuidade de Negócios: entenda a nova terminologia

  1. 1. DRAFT INTERNATIONAL STANDARD ISO/DIS 22300 ISO/TC 223 Secretariat: SIS Voting begins on Voting terminates on 2010-12-22 2011-05-22INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATION FOR STANDARDIZATION • МЕЖДУНАРОДНАЯ ОРГАНИЗАЦИЯ ПО СТАНДАРТИЗАЦИИ • ORGANISATION INTERNATIONALE DE NORMALISATIONSocietal security — VocabularySécurité sociétale — VocabulaireICS 01.040.03; 03.100.01 In accordance with the provisions of Council Resolution 15/1993 this document is circulated in the English language only. Conformément aux dispositions de la Résolution du Conseil 15/1993, ce document est distribué en version anglaise seulement. To expedite distribution, this document is circulated as received from the committee secretariat. ISO Central Secretariat work of editing and text composition will be undertaken at publication stage. Pour accélérer la distribution, le présent document est distribué tel quil est parvenu du secrétariat du comité. Le travail de rédaction et de composition de texte sera effectué au Secrétariat central de lISO au stade de publication.THIS DOCUMENT IS A DRAFT CIRCULATED FOR COMMENT AND APPROVAL. IT IS THEREFORE SUBJECT TO CHANGE AND MAY NOT BEREFERRED TO AS AN INTERNATIONAL STANDARD UNTIL PUBLISHED AS SUCH.IN ADDITION TO THEIR EVALUATION AS BEING ACCEPTABLE FOR INDUSTRIAL, TECHNOLOGICAL, COMMERCIAL AND USER PURPOSES,DRAFT INTERNATIONAL STANDARDS MAY ON OCCASION HAVE TO BE CONSIDERED IN THE LIGHT OF THEIR POTENTIAL TO BECOMESTANDARDS TO WHICH REFERENCE MAY BE MADE IN NATIONAL REGULATIONS.RECIPIENTS OF THIS DRAFT ARE INVITED TO SUBMIT, WITH THEIR COMMENTS, NOTIFICATION OF ANY RELEVANT PATENT RIGHTS OF WHICHTHEY ARE AWARE AND TO PROVIDE SUPPORTING DOCUMENTATION.© International Organization for Standardization, 2010
  2. 2. ISO/DIS 22300 PDF disclaimer This PDF file may contain embedded typefaces. In accordance with Adobes licensing policy, this file may be printed or viewed but shall not be edited unless the typefaces which are embedded are licensed to and installed on the computer performing the editing. In downloading this file, parties accept therein the responsibility of not infringing Adobes licensing policy. The ISO Central Secretariat accepts no liability in this area. Adobe is a trademark of Adobe Systems Incorporated. Details of the software products used to create this PDF file can be found in the General Info relative to the file; the PDF-creation parameters were optimized for printing. Every care has been taken to ensure that the file is suitable for use by ISO member bodies. In the unlikely event that a problem relating to it is found, please inform the Central Secretariat at the address given below. Copyright notice This ISO document is a Draft International Standard and is copyright-protected by ISO. Except as permitted under the applicable laws of the user’s country, neither this ISO draft nor any extract from it may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, photocopying, recording or otherwise, without prior written permission being secured. Requests for permission to reproduce should be addressed to either ISO at the address below or ISO’s member body in the country of the requester. ISO copyright office Case postale 56 • CH-1211 Geneva 20 Tel. + 41 22 749 01 11 Fax + 41 22 749 09 47 E-mail copyright@iso.org Web www.iso.org Reproduction may be subject to royalty payments or a licensing agreement. Violators may be prosecuted.ii © ISO 2010 – All rights reserved
  3. 3. ISO/DIS 22300Contents PageForeword ............................................................................................................................................................iv1 Scope ......................................................................................................................................................12 Terms and definitions ...........................................................................................................................12.1 Societal security ....................................................................................................................................12.2 Management of societal security.........................................................................................................32.3 Operational – Risk Reduction ..............................................................................................................62.4 Operational – Training ..........................................................................................................................72.5 Operational - Recovery .........................................................................................................................92.6 Technology ..........................................................................................................................................10Bibliography......................................................................................................................................................11Index ..................................................................................................................................................................12© ISO 2010 – All rights reserved iii
  4. 4. ISO/DIS 22300ForewordISO (the International Organization for Standardization) is a worldwide federation of national standards bodies(ISO member bodies). The work of preparing International Standards is normally carried out through ISOtechnical committees. Each member body interested in a subject for which a technical committee has beenestablished has the right to be represented on that committee. International organizations, governmental andnon-governmental, in liaison with ISO, also take part in the work. ISO collaborates closely with theInternational Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) on all matters of electrotechnical standardization.International Standards are drafted in accordance with the rules given in the ISO/IEC Directives, Part 2.The main task of technical committees is to prepare International Standards. Draft International Standardsadopted by the technical committees are circulated to the member bodies for voting. Publication as anInternational Standard requires approval by at least 75 % of the member bodies casting a vote.Attention is drawn to the possibility that some of the elements of this document may be the subject of patentrights. ISO shall not be held responsible for identifying any or all such patent rights.ISO 22300 was prepared by Technical Committee ISO/TC 223, Societal security.iv © ISO 2010 – All rights reserved
  5. 5. DRAFT INTERNATIONAL STANDARD ISO/DIS 22300Societal security — Vocabulary1 ScopeThis International Standard contains terms and their definitions applicable to societal security to establish acommon understanding so that consistent terms are used.2 Terms and definitionsFor the purposes of this document, the following terms and definitions apply.2.1 Societal security2.1.1societal securityprotection of society from, and response to, incidents, emergencies and disasters caused by intentional andunintentional human acts, natural hazards, and technical failures2.1.2intertested party (preferred term)stakeholder (admitted term)person or group of people that holds a view that can affect the organization2.1.3societal security frameworkset of components that provide the foundations and organizational arrangements for designing, implementing,monitoring, reviewing and continually improving societal securityNOTE 1 The foundations include policy, objectives, mandate and commitment to manage societal security.NOTE 2 Organizational arrangements include plans, relationships, accountabilities, resources, processes and activities.2.1.4civil protectionmeasures taken and systems implemented to preserve the lives and health of citizens, their properties andtheir environment from undesired eventsNOTE Undesired events may include accidents, emergencies and disasters.2.1.5riskeffect of uncertainty on objectivesNOTE 1 An effect is a deviation from the expected - positive and/or negative.NOTE 2 Objectives can relate to different disciplines (such as financial, health and safety, and environmental goals)and can apply at different levels (such as strategic, organization-wide, project, product, and process). An objective can beexpressed in other ways, eg, as an intended outcome, a purpose, an operational criterion, as a societal security objective,or by the use of other words with similar meaning (eg, aim, goal, or target).© ISO 2010 – All rights reserved 1
  6. 6. ISO/DIS 22300NOTE 3 Risk is often characterized by reference to potential events, and consequences, or a combination of these.NOTE 4 Risk is often expressed in terms of a combination of the consequences of an event (including changes incircumstances) and the associated likelihood of occurrence.NOTE 5 Uncertainty is the state, even partial, of deficiency of information related to, understanding or knowledge of, anevent, its consequence, or likelihood.NOTE 6 In the context of societal security management system standards societal security objectives are set by theorganization, consistent with the societal security policy to achieve specific results.2.1.6disaster risk reductionconcept and practice of reducing disaster risks through efforts to analyse and manage the causal factors ofdisastersNOTE Efforts include reduced exposure to hazards, lessened vulnerability of people and property, wise managementof land and the environment, and improved preparedness for adverse events.2.1.7safetystatus or condition of people, property, information and operation being protected against or from intentional,unintentional human act or natural disaster2.1.8securityresistance to events that may cause harm or damage2.1.9threatpotential cause of an unwanted incident, which may result in harm to individuals, a system or organization, theenvironment or the community2.1.10eventoccurrence or change of a particular set of circumstancesNOTE 1 Nature, likelihood, and consequence of an event cannot be fully knowable.NOTE 2 An event can be one or more occurrences, and can have several causes.NOTE 3 Likelihood associated with the event can be determined.NOTE 4 An event can consist of a non occurrence of one or more circumstances.NOTE 5 An event with a consequence is sometimes referred to as "incident".NOTE 6 An event where no loss occurs may also be referred to as a "near miss", "near hit", "close call" or "dangerousoccurrence".2.1.11disastersituation where widespread human, material, economic or environmental losses have occurred whichexceeded the ability of the affected organization, community or society to respond and recover using its ownresources2.1.12emergencyunforeseen occurrence; a sudden and urgent occasion for action2 © ISO 2010 – All rights reserved
  7. 7. ISO/DIS 223002.1.13crisissituation with high level of uncertainty that disrupts the core activities and / or credibility of an organization andrequires urgent action2.1.14all-hazardsnaturally occurring events, human induced events (both intentional and non-intentional) and technologycaused events with potential impact on an organization, community or society and the environment on which itdepends2.1.15hazardsource of potential harmNOTE Hazard can be a source of risk.2.1.16incidentsituation that might be, or could lead to, a disruption, loss, emergency or crisis2.1.17mitigationmeasures taken to limit, or make less serious or severe, the negative consequences of unavoidableemergencies and disasters2.1.18resilienceadaptive capacity of an organization in a complex and changing environment2.2 Management of societal security2.2.1emergency managementoverall approach preventing and managing emergencies that might occurNOTE In general, the emergency management consists of risk identification, prevention, preparedness, responseand recovery.2.2.2policyintentions and direction of an organization as formally expressed by top management2.2.3objectiveresult to be achievedNOTE 1 An objective can be strategic, tactical, or operational.NOTE 2 An objective can be expressed in other ways, eg, as an intended outcome, a purpose, an operational criterion,as a societal security objective or by the use of other words of similar meaning (eg, aim, goal, or target).2.2.4top managementperson or group of people who directs and controls an organization at the highest levelNOTE 1 Top management has the power to delegate authority and provide resources within the organization.NOTE 2 An organization for this purpose can be identified by reference to the scope of the implementation of amanagement system.© ISO 2010 – All rights reserved 3
  8. 8. ISO/DIS 223002.2.5management systemset of interrelated or interacting elements of an organization to establish policies and objectives, andprocesses to achieve those objectivesNOTE 1 A management system can address a single discipline or several disciplines.NOTE 2 The system elements include the organization’s structure, roles and responsibilities, planning, operation, etc.NOTE 3 The scope of a management system may include the whole of the organization, specific and identifiedfunctions of the organization, specific and identified sections of the organization, or one or more functions across a groupof organizations.2.2.6business impact analysisprocess of analysing activities and the effect that the business disruption might have upon them2.2.7sensitive informationinformation protected from public disclosure only because it would have an adverse effect on an organization,national security or public safety2.2.8risk sourceelement which alone or in combination has the intrinsic potential to give rise to riskNOTE A risk source can be tangible or intangible.2.2.9organizationperson or group of people that has its own functions with responsibilities, authorities and relationships toachieve its objectivesNOTE The concept of organization includes, but is not limited to sole-trader, company, corporation, firm, enterprise,authority, partnership, charity or institution, or part or combination thereof, whether incorporated or not, public or private.2.2.10risk ownerperson or entity with the accountability and authority to manage a risk text of the definition2.2.11performancemeasurable resultNOTE 1 Performance can relate either to quantitative or qualitative findingsNOTE 2 Performance can relate to the management of activities, processes, products (including services), systems, ororganizations2.2.12partnershiporganized relationship between two bodies (public-public, private-public, private- private) which establishesscope, roles, procedures and tools to prevent and manage any incident impacting on societal security withrespect of related laws.2.2.13mutual aid agreementpre-arranged agreement developed between two or more entities to render assistance to one another4 © ISO 2010 – All rights reserved
  9. 9. ISO/DIS 22300NOTE In the public sector a memorandum of understanding (MOU) can be used as the basis of a Mutual AidAgreement (MAU).2.2.14exercise programmea process building toward a full-scale exercise2.2.15capacitycombination of all the strengths and resources available within an organization, community or society that canreduce the level of risk, or the effects of a crisisNOTE Capacity may include physical, institutional, social, or economic means as well as skilled personnel orattributes such as leadership and management2.2.16competenceability to apply knowledge and skills to achieve intended results2.2.17nonconformitynon-fulfilment of a requirement2.2.18correctionaction to eliminate a detected nonconformity2.2.19corrective actionaction to eliminate the cause of a nonconformity and to prevent recurrenceNOTE in the case of other undesirable outcomes, action is necessary to minimise or eliminate the causes and toreduce the impact or prevent recurrence. Such actions fall outside the concept of “corrective action” in the sense of thisdefinition.2.2.20residual riskrisk remaining after risk treatmentNOTE 1 Residual risk can contain unidentified risk.NOTE 2 Residual risk is also known as “retained” risk text of the definition.2.2.21conformityfulfilment of a requirement2.2.22auditsystematic, independent and documented process for obtaining audit evidence and evaluating it objectively todetermine the extent to which the audit criteria are fulfilledNOTE 1 An audit may be an internal audit (first party) or an external audit (second party or third party), and it may be acombined audit (combining two or more disciplines) or a joint audit (by two or more auditing organizations or of two ormore audited organizations).NOTE 2 “Audit evidence” and “audit criteria” are defined in ISO 19011.© ISO 2010 – All rights reserved 5
  10. 10. ISO/DIS 223002.2.23verificationconfirmation, through the provision of evidence, that specified requirements have been fulfilled2.2.24evaluationsystematic process that compares the result of measurement to recognized criterion to determine the gapbetween intended and actual performanceNOTE The gaps are inputs into the continual improvement process.2.2.25effectivenessextent to which planned activities are realized and planned results achieved2.2.26validationverification for a specific or intended use2.2.27continual improvementrecurring activity to enhance performance2.3 Operational – Risk Reduction2.3.1work environmentset of conditions under which work is performedNOTE Conditions include physical, social, psychological and environmental factors such as temperature, recognitionschemes, ergonomics and atmospheric composition.2.3.2vulnerabilityintrinsic properties of something resulting in susceptibility to a risk source that can lead to an event with aconsequence2.3.3risk assessmentoverall process of risk identification, risk analysis, and risk evaluation2.3.4probabilitymeasure of the chance of occurrence expressed as a number between 0 and 1 where 0 is impossibility and 1is absolute certainty2.3.5prioritized activitiesactivities to which urgent priority must be given following an incident in order to mitigate impacts.NOTE Terms in common use to describe activities within this group include: critical, essential, vital, urgent and key.2.3.6contingencypossible future event, condition or eventualityNOTE The event, condition or eventuality may be of an emergency nature.6 © ISO 2010 – All rights reserved
  11. 11. ISO/DIS 223002.3.7trainingactivities designed to facilitate the learning and development of knowledge, skills, and abilities, and to improvethe performance of specific tasks or roles2.3.8testexercise whose aim is to obtain an expected, measurable pass/fail outcomeNOTE A test is a unique and particular type of exercise, which incorporates an expectation of a pass or fail elementwithin the aim or objectives of the exercise being planned.2.3.9testinga procedure for evaluation; a means of determining the presence, quality, or veracity of somethingNOTE 1 Assessing a capability with the result being either pass or failNOTE 2 Testing may be referred to as a “trial”NOTE 3: Testing is often applied to supporting plans.NOTE 4 The intent of testing is to improve the overall performance of an organization.2.4 Operational – Training2.4.1scenariopre-planned storyline that drives an exercise, the stimuli used to achieve exercise objectives2.4.2injectscripted piece of information input in the exercise designed to elicit a response or decision and facilitate theflow of the exercise2.4.3role playerexercise participant who responds to a set of stimuli generated by the exercise script; creates or simulates ascenario by acting out the role of someone who would be involved in a real incident2.4.4scriptstory of the exercise as it develops which allows directing staff to understand how events will develop duringexercise play as the various elements of the master events list are introducedNOTE The script is often written as a narrative of simulated events text of the definition.2.4.5exercise co-ordinatorperson responsible for planning, coordinating, and implementing exercisesNOTE This person is also responsible for the cooperation among entities, divisions, and external organizations inlarge-scale exercises.2.4.6observerexercise participant who watches selected segments as they unfold while remaining separate from role playeractivities© ISO 2010 – All rights reserved 7
  12. 12. ISO/DIS 22300NOTE Observers play a crucial role in the debriefing and reporting process after an exercise. The term is also usedfor "VIP observers", who usually visit the exercise for only a short time, largely for internal or external PR purposes, and donot take part in the debrief.2.4.7monitoringdetermining the status of a system, a process or an activityNOTE To determine the status there may be a need to check, supervise or critically observe.2.4.8drilltext of the definition a coordinated, supervised activity usually employed to train and to test a single specificoperation or function within a single entityNOTE Example a fire department conducts a decontamination drill.2.4.9exercisea process to train for, assess, practice, and improve performance in an organisationNOTE Exercises can be used for validating policies, plans, procedures, training, equipment, and inter organizationalagreements; clarifying and training personnel in roles and responsibilities; improving inter-organizational coordination andcommunications; identifying gaps in resources; improving individual performance and identifying opportunities forimprovement; and controlled opportunity to practice improvisation.2.4.10exercise safety officerperson tasked with ensuring that any actions during the exercise and testing are performed safelyNOTE 1 Usually relevant to a "live play" exercise.NOTE 2 The Exercise Safety Officer should be involved from the planning of the exercise and testing through to thedebriefing.2.4.11functional exercisean exercise to train for, assess, practice, and improve performance of single functions designed to respond toand recover from an unwanted eventNOTE 1 Functions could include an emergency operations center (EOC) team or crisis management team or firefighters decontaminating mock victims.NOTE 2 A functional exercise does not involve any actual action.2.4.12full-scale exercisean exercise which involves multiple organizations and functions and includes actual activities2.4.13strategic exercisea process to assess, train for, practice, and improve performance of critical personnel at the strategic level ofan organizationNOTE Strategic level critical staff include inter-ministerial crisis staff, political-administrative staff, cross-sector andcross-departmental management staff, and the crisis management organisation of the corporate management team.2.4.14post-exercise reportdocument which records, describes and analyses the exercise, drawing on debriefs and reports fromobservers, and derives lessons from it8 © ISO 2010 – All rights reserved
  13. 13. ISO/DIS 223002.4.15exercise annual plandocument in which the exercise policy plan has been translated to exercise goals, exercises, and in whichexercise agenda or exercise calendar for a certain year are reflected2.5 Operational - Recovery2.5.1alertwarning addressed to persons in the danger environment or request for human intervention caused by alarm,tamper or faultNOTE 1 Human intervention could be emergency services.NOTE 2 Sometimes the term alarm warning is used instead.2.5.2warningdissemination of message signalling imminent hazard which may include advice on protective measures2.5.3Incident responseactions taken in order to mitigate the consequences of an incidentNOTE Incident response is part of the emergency management process.2.5.4Incident commandpart of an organized incident response structureNOTE Incident command is the process that is conducted within the command structures that evolve during themanagement of an incident.2.5.5command and controla process that supports effective management of all available capacity in an organizationNOTE this process will support the management during routine, emergency, continuity and/or recovery2.5.6co-ordinationtext of the definition way in which different organizations or parts of the same organization (public or private)work or act together in order to achieve a common objectiveNOTE 1 Co-ordination integrates the individual response activities of involved parties (including e.g. public or privateorganizations and government) to achieve synergy to the extent that the incident response has a unified objective andcoordinate activities through transparent information sharing regarding their respective incident response activities.NOTE 2 All organizations are involved in the process to agree on a common incident response objective and accept toimplement the strategies by this consensus decision-making process.2.5.7improvizationact of inventing, composing or performing with little or no preparation as reaction to the unexpected2.5.8operational informationvarious forms of information that have varying degrees of utility for commanders and their staff© ISO 2010 – All rights reserved 9
  14. 14. ISO/DIS 223002.5.9protectionmeasures that enable an organization to reduce the impact of a potential disruption2.5.10recoveryrestoration and improvement, where appropriate of operations, facilities, livelihoods or living conditions ofaffected organizations including efforts to reduce risk factors2.5.11shelter in placeremain or take immediate refuge in a protected location relevant to the risk2.6 Technology2.6.1forensicuse of knowledge and techniques derived from various sciences in an investigation2.6.2logical structuredata that is arranged to make sense to a given user2.6.3alarmwarning of the presence of a hazard to life, property or the environmentNOTE An alarm can be generated by the video surveillance system (typically by a detection algorithm) or externalsource as a notice to operators that a potentially harmful event is suspected and that an action must be taken; to beprocessed alarms must be self explanatory, dated and localized without ambiguity.2.6.4CCTV systemtelevision system in which signals are not publicly distributedNOTE A surveillance system may be comprised of cameras, recorders and displays and used to monitor activities ina specific infrastructure.2.6.5video surveillanceuse of video cameras to transmit a signal to a specific place2.6.6metadatainformation to describe audiovisual content and data essence in a format defined by ISO or any other authority2.6.7static metadatadata associated with a digital image aside from the pixel values that does not change over the time or at leastdoes not change over the addressed sequence2.6.8dynamic metadatadata associated with a digital image aside from the pixel values which can change for each frame of a videosequence10 © ISO 2010 – All rights reserved
  15. 15. ISO/DIS 22300 Bibliography[1] ISO 9000:2005 Quality Management Systems – Fundamentals and requirements[2] ISO Guide 73: 2009 Risk Management Vocabulary[3] ISO/PAS 22399:2007, Societal security – Guideline for incident preparedness and operational continuity management[4] ISO JTCG/TF1/N28 & JTCG/TF3/N125] - Management Systems Standards —Terms and definitions and recommendations for their usage© ISO 2010 – All rights reserved 11
  16. 16. DRAFT INTERNATIONAL STANDARD ISO/DIS 22300 IndexA Incident command 2.5.4 incident response 2.5.3alarm 2.6.3 inject 2.4.2alert 2.5.1 interested party (preferred term) 2.1.2all-hazards 2.1.14audit 2.2.22 L logical structure 2.6.2Bbusiness impact analysis 2.2.6 M management system 2.2.5C metadata 2.6.6capacity 2.2.15 mitigation 2.1.17CCTV system 2.6.4 monitoring 2.4.7civil protection 2.1.4 mutual aid agreement 2.2.13command and control 2.5.5competence 2.2.16 Ncontingency 2.3.6 nonconformity 2.2.17co-ordination 2.5.6conformity 2.2.21 Ocontinual improvement 2.2.27 objective 2.2.3correction 2.2.18 observer 2.4.6corrective action 2.2.19 operational information 2.5.8crisis 2.1.13 organization 2.2.9D Pdisaster 2.1.11 partnership 2.2.12disaster risk reduction 2.1.6 performance 2.2.11drill 2.4.8 policy 2.2.2dynamic meta data 2.6.8 post-exercise report 2.4.14 prioritized activities 2.3.5E probability 2.3.4effectiveness 2.2.25 protection 2.5.9emergency 2.1.12emergency management 2.2.1 Revaluation 2.2.24 recilience 2.1.18event 2.1.10 recovery 2.5.10exercise 2.4.9 residual risk 2.2.20exercise annual plan 2.4.15 mitigation 2.1.17exercise co-ordinator 2.4.5 risk 2.1.5exercise programme 2.2.14 risk assessment 2.3.3exercise safety officer 2.4.10 risk owner 2.2.10 risk source 2.2.8F role player 2.4.3forensic 2.6.1full-scale exercise 2.4.12 Sfunctional exercise 2.4.11 safety 2.1.7 scenario 2.4.1H script 2.4.4hazard 2.1.15 security 2.1.8 sensitive information 2.2.7I shelter in place 2.5.11improvization 2.5.7 societal security 2.1.1incident 2.1.16 societal security framework 2.1.3© ISO 2010 – All rights reserved 12
  17. 17. ISO/DIS 22300stakeholder (admitted term) 2.1.2strategic exercise 2.4.13static metadata 2.6.7Ttest 2.3.8testing 2.3.9threat 2.1.9top management 2.2.4training 2.3.7Vvalidation 2.2.26verification 2.2.23video surveillance 2.6.5vulnerability 2.3.2Wwarning 2.5.2work environment 2.3.1© ISO 2010 – All rights reserved 13

×