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Community Meeting Presentation for Southwest Franklin County
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Community Meeting Presentation for Southwest Franklin County

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  • 1. The Impact of Household Sewage Treatment Systems (HSTS) on Storm Water Pollution Southwest Community Meeting Tuesday, September 20, 2011
  • 2. Welcome and Introductions Joe Durham, Attorney at Law Eastman & Smith, LTD.
  • 3. Overview of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Storm Water Permit for Franklin County and the Townships Jennifer Fish, Director Franklin Soil and Water Conservation District
  • 4. Storm Water Defined Water Quantity
  • 5. Storm Water Defined Water Quality
  • 6. Purpose of Franklin County and Township Storm Water Program
    • Compliance with Ohio Environmental Protection Agency NPDES municipal storm water permit.
    • Share resources and expertise by co-permitting.
    • Water quality and stream corridor protection.
  • 7. Franklin County and Township Storm Water Program Participants
      • Franklin County Townships
      • Franklin County Drainage Engineer
      • Franklin County Economic Development and Planning
      • Franklin County Sanitary Engineer
      • Franklin County Public Health
      • Franklin Soil and Water Conservation District
      • Residents and businesses in unincorporated Franklin County
      • Developers , contractors and consultants working in unincorporated Franklin County
  • 8. Franklin County and Township Storm Water Community Benefits
    • Public health
    • Drinking water
    • Recreation
    • Wildlife
    • Reduced infrastructure costs
    • Quality of life
  • 9.
      • Public education
      • Public involvement
      • Illicit discharge detection and elimination
      • Construction site runoff
      • Post construction site management
      • Good housekeeping/pollution prevention
    Storm Water Permit Requirements
  • 10. Storm Water Program Highlights
    • Storm water education efforts.
    • Mapping of storm sewers to be added to existing drainage and stream resource maps.
    • Enhanced county regulations for construction site and post-construction management.
    • Participation of county and townships in pollution prevention programs.
    • Continued resolution of illicit discharges including failing HSTS.
  • 11. Report Pollution!
    • Failing Household Sewage Treatment Systems
      • Franklin County Public Health
    • (614) 525-HSTS (4787) or failingHSTS@franklincountyohio.gov
    • Report Emergency Spills
    • Ohio EPA 24-Hour Emergency Hotline
    • 1 (800) 282-9378
    • Report any other water pollution related complaint or concern to:
    • Franklin Soil and Water Conservation District (614) 486-9613
  • 12. General Overview of the Storm Water Permit Terminology Jennifer Fish, Director Franklin Soil and Water Conservation District
  • 13. Current Townships and ‘Urbanized Areas’
  • 14. Definitions
    • National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System
    • (NPDES)
    • Municipal Separate Storm Sewer System (MS4)
    • Illicit Discharge Detection and Elimination (IDDE)
    • Household Sewage Treatment Systems (HSTS)
  • 15. Storm Water and Sanitary Sewers
  • 16. Questions?
  • 17. Overview of Illicit Discharge and Elimination (IDDE) Paul Rosile, Director of Environmental Health & Assistant Health Commissioner Franklin County Public Health
  • 18. IDDE Topics Include
    • Explanation of public health risks
    • Requirements of homeowners with HSTS
    • Identify and eliminate failing HSTS
    • Where are the public health risks
    • When to expect these requirements
  • 19. What are the Public Health Risks?
    • Untreated or improperly treated sewage can contaminate:
      • drinking water supply
      • drainage ditches
      • streams, rivers and lakes
    • When household sewage treatment systems fail, untreated sewage is discharged into the environment.
  • 20.  
  • 21. The aeration system was invented in the 1970’s as a treatment option for households not connected to the sanitary sewer
  • 22. Human Fecal Pollution
  • 23. What are the Public Health Risks?
    • Contact with human waste can pose health risks because it can carry disease-causing organisms.
    • Health risks are directly tied to exposure and ingestion of untreated sewage.
    • The young, the old and those with chronic conditions are at higher risk.
  • 24. Avoid Exposure
    • Do not allow kids and pets to play in water that looks and smells like sewage.
    • Do not swallow or get water from ditches or streams in your mouth or nose.
    • If you are in those types of areas, wash hands thoroughly with soap and water.
  • 25. Failed aeration system
  • 26. Discharge pipe Untreated sewage
  • 27. Discharge pipe with untreated human waste
  • 28. Untreated sewage in catch basin storm sewer
  • 29. Untreated sewage Storm sewer
  • 30. Questions?
  • 31. Requirements of Homeowners with Household Sewage Treatment Systems Paul Rosile, Director of Environmental Health & Assistant Health Commissioner Franklin County Public Health
  • 32. Old Aeration System Aeration chamber
  • 33. Maintaining Aeration Systems
    • Annual inspection by Franklin County Public Health (FCPH) or a maintenance contract.
    • Properly operating motor.
    • Properly operating air intake.
    • Tank pumped based on manufacturers recommendations.
  • 34. Septic Tank and Leach Field Systems
  • 35. Maintaining Septic and Leach Field Systems
    • Tank pumped based on manufacturers recommendations.
    • Functional baffles.
    • Check for sewage or ponding in your yard.
    • Ensure leach field is not connected into a farm tile, ditch or storm sewer.
  • 36. Septic and Leach Field System Failures
  • 37. Why HSTS Fail
    • Aeration, septic and leach systems fail because:
      • Unsuitable soil conditions
      • Improper design and installation
      • Inadequate maintenance
      • Age of the system
      • Amount of water use
  • 38. Identify and Eliminate Failing HSTS Paul Rosile, Director of Environmental Health & Assistant Health Commissioner Franklin County Public Health
  • 39. Priority 1
    • If sanitary sewer is available and accessible, homeowners will be ordered to abandon their HSTS and connect.
      • Whether the system is operating correctly or not, the homeowner will be required to connect.
      • Required by FCPH regulations and state law.
  • 40. Priority 2
    • Identify discharging HSTS not issued permits by FCPH.
    • Removal of those systems will be required. This may include:
      • Replacing with a soil absorption system.
      • If that is not feasible, replace with a new system covered under an Ohio EPA general NPDES permit.
  • 41. Norweco Best Available Technology (BAT) meets OEPA NPDES permit for discharge standards
  • 42. Jet BAT meets OEPA NPDES permit for discharge standards
  • 43. Priority 3 and 4
    • Identify HSTS discharges causing “obvious” or “suspicious” pollution.
      • Verified evidence that sewage pollution is causing a public health nuisance.
      • Identified conditions that could have been caused by contamination.
    • FCPH will determine if a failed HSTS is causing a nuisance.
  • 44. Definition of a Public Health Nuisance
        • The liquid discharge has a distinct sewage odor, a black or gray coloration, or the presence of organic matter and any of the following:
          • Dye test shows presence of sewage.
          • Samples show presence of fecal coliform at a level that is equal to or greater than five thousand colonies per one hundred milliliters of liquid.
          • Samples show more than one thousand thirty e. coli counts per one hundred milliliters of liquid.
  • 45. Priority 3 and 4, continued
    • If the system is causing nuisance, homeowners will be required to abate the nuisance. This may include:
      • Replacing with a soil absorption system.
      • Repairing existing system.
      • If that is not feasible, replace with a new system covered under an Ohio EPA general NPDES permit.
    • If there is no pollution, no further action is needed.
  • 46. Where are the Public Health Risks?
    • Every township in Franklin County.
    • In urban areas.
    • In rural areas.
    • Along roadways.
    • Along streams.
  • 47. How Do We Know the Risks Exist?
    • Nuisance and pollution complaints.
    • Maintenance reports by HSTS owners.
    • Annual inspections performed by FCPH.
    • Observation during roadway construction.
    • Dry Weather Screening for NPDES permit.
  • 48. What is Dry Weather Screening?
    • In-field evaluation of MS4 components.
    Man-Made Features Natural Features
  • 49. Dry Weather Screening Features Evaluated: Flowing pipes Non-flowing pipes Flowing channels Non-flowing channels Catch basins Manholes Point generics Channels: Flowing & Non-Flowing Pipes: No Flow Pipes: Flowing Point Generics – Features of Interest
  • 50. What is Dry Weather Screening?
    • G.P.S. used for location and data collection
    • Qualitative Observations:
      • Feature type
      • Flow condition
      • Material
      • Size
      • Odors
      • Colors
      • Turbidity
      • Floatables
      • Pool quality
  • 51. How We Summarized Health Risks?
    • Use of existing records.
    • Use of existing data sets.
    • Development of new data sets.
    • Extensive use of G.I.S.
    GIS: ( G eographic I nformation S ystem) GIS is a computer-based technology developed around geo-spatial information (having a location on the earth's surface). GIS allows for data development, management, and analysis as well as the presentation of the data in a variety of visual formats including maps, database tables and charts.
  • 52. How We Summarized Health Risks? Franklin County Public Health and Franklin Soil and Water Conservation District have created a ranked list of “Identified Areas of Concern.” The following metrics were used within a GIS to identify and rank these Areas of Concern. - Dry Weather Screening Results - Locations of HSTS - Population/Building Density
  • 53. Dry Weather Screening Density Variable
  • 54. Dry Weather Screening Density Variable - ENLARGEMENT -
  • 55. Population / Building Density Variable
  • 56. HSTS Density Variable
  • 57. Summarizing Variables DWS Density HSTS Density Population / Housing Density Numerical values assigned to density layers. Typical for each layer produced 0 4 6 5 3 2 1
  • 58. Highest Ranking Areas Extracted / Highlighted 3 Variables Summarized
  • 59.
    • Areas of Concern (AOC)
    • delineated by parcel boundaries
  • 60. How Long Will It Take For FCPH To Identify and Eliminate Failing HSTS Causing Public Health Nuisances? Paul Rosile, Director of Environmental Health & Assistant Health Commissioner Franklin County Public Health
  • 61. How Long Will It Take?
    • Don’t know exactly.
      • FCPH will begin its investigations within the highest ranked areas and work through to the lowest ranked areas.
      • FCPH will use the prioritized approach to identify and eliminate failed HSTS causing public health nuisances.
  • 62. Financial  Resources Available to Qualified Residents
    • HUD Community Development Block Grant
      • Grant provided by the Franklin County Board of Commissioners.
      • $100,000 total, deferred lien.
      • For repairing or replacing HSTS or connecting to sanitary sewer.
      • Contact the Mid-Ohio Regional Planning Commission at (614) 233-4171.
  • 63. Financial  Resources Available to Qualified Residents
    • Ohio EPA Grant
      • Grant provided through the Franklin County Board of Commissioners.
      • $160,000 total grant.
      • For repairing or replacing HSTS.
      • Contact Franklin County Public Health at (614) 525-4261.
  • 64. Financial  Resources Available to Qualified Residents
    • Ohio EPA
      • Potential grant through the Franklin County Board of Commissioners.
      • Application in process :  requested $1.5 million linked deposit low interest loan. 
      • For connecting to sanitary sewer.
      • Contact Franklin County Public Health at (614)525-4261.
  • 65. Comments on IDDE Plan
    • Complete plan is available for review at www.myfcph.org.
    • Plan is open for a public comment period that will end at the close of business on October 28, 2011.
    • Comments will be accepted in writing, and by phone or by email to:
      • FCPH, Attention: Paul Rosile
      • 280 East Broad Street, Columbus, OH 43215
      • Phone: (614) 525-4787
      • Email: failingHSTS@franklincountyohio.gov
  • 66. Additional Information
    • Interactive maps of the Identified Areas of Concern are available at www.myfcph.org.
    • Follow-up questions?
      • Phone: (614) 525-4787
      • Email: failingHSTS@franklincountyohio.gov
  • 67. Questions and Wrap-Up?