Rebalancing the U.S. Foreign Policy Toolbox Friends Committee on National Legislation
The Current U.S. Foreign Policy Toolbox:  A Quiz <ul><li>Which does the U.S. government have more of: </li></ul><ul><li>A....
Current U.S. Foreign Policy Toolbox <ul><li>Answer:  C  </li></ul><ul><li>The U.S. has more military band members than dip...
Current U.S. Foreign Policy Toolbox <ul><li>The U.S. spends more annually on: </li></ul><ul><li>Foreign aid </li></ul><ul>...
Current U.S. Foreign Policy Toolbox <ul><li>Answer:  B, Interest on Pentagon Debt </li></ul><ul><li>In 2009, $176.5 billio...
Current U.S. Foreign Policy Toolbox <ul><li>What percentage of your 2009 tax money was spent on civilian capacities to pre...
Current U.S. Foreign Policy Toolbox <ul><li>Answer: C—1% </li></ul><ul><li>This money pays for all diplomatic and consular...
Spending Priorities Askew <ul><li>$803.5 billion was spent in 2009 on 3-D’s of global engagement (Defense, Diplomacy, and ...
Soldiers over Diplomats
Militarization of Foreign Policy <ul><li>As the Pentagon has assumed greater resources, it has taken on civilian foreign p...
So what? <ul><li>Don’t we need a strong military to respond to threats and keep us safe?  </li></ul><ul><li>Doesn’t the mi...
What threatens our security?
<ul><li>“ It has become clear that America's civilian institutions of diplomacy and development have been chronically unde...
Good for the economy? <ul><li>Center for Defense Information: </li></ul><ul><li>&quot;As far as providing jobs, military s...
A more effective toolbox <ul><li>Increase investments in the tools of: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>D iplomacy </li></ul></ul><ul...
Diplomacy <ul><li>Expand diplomatic corps and provide training in conflict analysis, negotiation and mediation, prevention...
Development <ul><li>Rebuild USAID with technical experts and development professionals </li></ul><ul><li>Strengthen and ma...
International Cooperation <ul><li>Pay in full and on time U.S. dues to the UN and to other multilateral organizations;  </...
Cut Military Spending <ul><li>Rep. Barney Frank proposes 25% cut in annual DoD budget. </li></ul><ul><li>“ If we are going...
The Right Toolbox Needs the  Right Blueprints <ul><li>Make the prevention of deadly conflict, including genocide and mass ...
What YOU Can Do <ul><li>Visit  www.fcnl.org </li></ul><ul><li>Sign up for email lists. (Prevent War) </li></ul><ul><li>Wri...
 
Your Members of Congress <ul><li>On this slide add information about your Senators and Representative. Questions to consid...
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FCNL PPDC Peace Toolbox 2010

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  • Pentagon Debt is interest due on the portion of the federal debt that was generated by past Pentagon spending.
  • The $176.5 billion was only paying the interest on the debt—not the principal. For more information go to http://www.fcnl.org/budget/how_were_your_taxes_spent09.htm.
  • Traditionally the State Department plans, budgets and oversees securityassistance programs and is the lead agency in charge of all U.S. foreign policy and global engagement. The DOD has supported overall foreign and national security policy by implementing these programs. This relationship was designed to ensure that security assistance was aligned with general U.S. foreign policy goals.
  • Does the U.S. have the tools to effectively address threats and promote peace and stability? Growing consensus says No. Current wars are no longer between national militaries only. Rather, violent conflicts arising out of poverty, inequality, wealth disparity, extremist ideologies. Military might cannot fight these forces—the U.S. government needs more nuanced tools.
  • Secretary of Defense Robert Gates and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton have been unified in their call to build up civilian capacities. Even the military understands that force alone will not ensure national security.
  • Beat their swords into ploughshares, spears into pruning hooks.
  • What FCNL Is Doing? Genocide Prevention Task Force
  • Sign in our window. Yard signs have been sent to all parts of the country; this year 2 ½ times as many as last year 12 months. We now have 474 distributors around the country, in all 50 states.
  • FCNL PPDC Peace Toolbox 2010

    1. 1. Rebalancing the U.S. Foreign Policy Toolbox Friends Committee on National Legislation
    2. 2. The Current U.S. Foreign Policy Toolbox: A Quiz <ul><li>Which does the U.S. government have more of: </li></ul><ul><li>A. Diplomats and foreign service officers </li></ul><ul><li>B. Development workers </li></ul><ul><li>C. Military band members </li></ul>
    3. 3. Current U.S. Foreign Policy Toolbox <ul><li>Answer: C </li></ul><ul><li>The U.S. has more military band members than diplomats or development workers. Both the State Department and USAID face chronic staffing shortages. </li></ul><ul><li>State Department has total of 25,000 personnel, but suffered from 2,400 vacancies in 2009. </li></ul><ul><li>In 1990, USAID had 3,500 people administering $5 billion in program funding for economic assistance. In 2009, 2,200 staffers oversaw $8 billion. </li></ul><ul><li>DoD maintains 2 million personnel worldwide, including more military band members and more lawyers than the entire foreign service. </li></ul><ul><li>Note: The 2010 State and Foreign Operations Appropriations bill included money for 700 new Foreign Service Officers at the State Department and 300 at USAID. Those positions are slowly being filled. </li></ul>
    4. 4. Current U.S. Foreign Policy Toolbox <ul><li>The U.S. spends more annually on: </li></ul><ul><li>Foreign aid </li></ul><ul><li>Interest on the Pentagon Debt </li></ul><ul><li>International diplomacy </li></ul>
    5. 5. Current U.S. Foreign Policy Toolbox <ul><li>Answer: B, Interest on Pentagon Debt </li></ul><ul><li>In 2009, $176.5 billion dollars, or 6% of the budget, was spent paying interest on the portion of the debt related to past military spending. That is almost five times the amount spent on ALL the civilian tools to prevent deadly conflict, including diplomacy, development and international cooperation ($36 billion, or 1%). </li></ul>
    6. 6. Current U.S. Foreign Policy Toolbox <ul><li>What percentage of your 2009 tax money was spent on civilian capacities to prevent war like diplomacy, development and international cooperation? </li></ul><ul><li>10.2% </li></ul><ul><li>5.6% </li></ul><ul><li>1.0% </li></ul>
    7. 7. Current U.S. Foreign Policy Toolbox <ul><li>Answer: C—1% </li></ul><ul><li>This money pays for all diplomatic and consular capacities, all development assistance, and all contributions to international organizations. </li></ul>
    8. 8. Spending Priorities Askew <ul><li>$803.5 billion was spent in 2009 on 3-D’s of global engagement (Defense, Diplomacy, and Development) </li></ul><ul><li>96% ($767.5 billion) was spent on military solutions </li></ul><ul><li>4% ($36 billion) remains for all U.S. diplomacy, development, and international cooperation </li></ul><ul><li>Source: White House Office of Management and Budget </li></ul><ul><li>Includes supplemental war spending in 2009. </li></ul>
    9. 9. Soldiers over Diplomats
    10. 10. Militarization of Foreign Policy <ul><li>As the Pentagon has assumed greater resources, it has taken on civilian foreign policy work – reconstruction, development, humanitarian assistance and the provision of military aid. </li></ul><ul><li>Increasingly, the face of U.S. engagement with the world is a military one. </li></ul><ul><li>“ You’ve heard it from us, some of us and certainly me, talk about our foreign policy being too militarized. I believe that. And it’s got to change.”, </li></ul><ul><li>- Admiral Michael Mullen, Chair of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, (Washington Post, Feb. 15, 2009) </li></ul>
    11. 11. So what? <ul><li>Don’t we need a strong military to respond to threats and keep us safe? </li></ul><ul><li>Doesn’t the military provide jobs and opportunities? </li></ul><ul><li>Isn’t the Obama administration going to fix U.S. foreign policy anyway? </li></ul>
    12. 12. What threatens our security?
    13. 13. <ul><li>“ It has become clear that America's civilian institutions of diplomacy and development have been chronically undermanned and underfunded for far too long -- relative to what we traditionally spend on the military, and more importantly, relative to the responsibilities and challenges our nation has around the world.” </li></ul><ul><li>Secretary of Defense, Robert M. Gates, July 15, 2008. </li></ul><ul><li>“ Simply put, it is time to repair our relationship with the world and begin to take it to the next level - a level defined not only by our military strength, but also by the lives we save and the opportunities we create for the people of other nations. We call upon the next president to elevate the use of tools such as development assistance and diplomacy as integral parts of our national security strategy.” </li></ul><ul><li>General Anthony C. Zinni, U.S. Marine Corps (Retired), March 28, 2008. </li></ul><ul><li>“ You’ve heard us, some of us and certainly me, talk about our foreign policy being too militarized. I believe that. And it’s got to change.” </li></ul><ul><li>Admiral Michael Mullen, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, February 9, 2009. </li></ul>
    14. 14. Good for the economy? <ul><li>Center for Defense Information: </li></ul><ul><li>&quot;As far as providing jobs, military spending is a much worse investment than other federally funded programs. For example, $1 billion spent by the Pentagon on weapons, supplies and services generates 25,000 jobs. However, the same $1 billion would also create 30,000 mass transit jobs, 36,000 housing jobs, 41,000 education jobs, or 47,000 health care jobs.&quot; </li></ul>
    15. 15. A more effective toolbox <ul><li>Increase investments in the tools of: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>D iplomacy </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>D evelopment </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>I nternational Cooperation </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Decrease military spending </li></ul><ul><li>Restore civilian control over foreign policy </li></ul>
    16. 16. Diplomacy <ul><li>Expand diplomatic corps and provide training in conflict analysis, negotiation and mediation, prevention and resolution of conflict </li></ul><ul><li>Redeploy foreign service officers to “global hot spots” (Central and East Africa, Middle East, Central Asia, Latin America) </li></ul><ul><li>Fully fund the Civilian Response Corps under the State Department </li></ul><ul><li>Permanently authorize and fully fund the Complex Crises Fund at no less than $100M. </li></ul>
    17. 17. Development <ul><li>Rebuild USAID with technical experts and development professionals </li></ul><ul><li>Strengthen and mainstream both conflict and environmentally sensitive development </li></ul><ul><li>“Untie” aid to make assistance more efficient and effective </li></ul><ul><li>Do not use development aid as a weapon of war </li></ul>
    18. 18. International Cooperation <ul><li>Pay in full and on time U.S. dues to the UN and to other multilateral organizations; </li></ul><ul><li>Remove the arbitrary cap on U.S. contributions to UN peacekeeping, which undermines the UN’s capacity to deploy effective missions </li></ul><ul><li>Strengthen UN diplomacy, post-conflict and prevention capacities, including the UN Peacebuilding Commission </li></ul><ul><li>Support capacity-building for regional organizations like the African Union and ASEAN </li></ul>
    19. 19. Cut Military Spending <ul><li>Rep. Barney Frank proposes 25% cut in annual DoD budget. </li></ul><ul><li>“ If we are going to get the deficit under control without slashing every domestic program, this is a necessity…The Pentagon is probably the most wasteful organization in the federal government and people have given it a pass for years.” </li></ul><ul><li>Secretary of Defense Gates has proposed ending some outdated Cold War weapon systems (F-22, C-17), but Congress continues to push back. </li></ul>
    20. 20. The Right Toolbox Needs the Right Blueprints <ul><li>Make the prevention of deadly conflict, including genocide and mass atrocities, a priority in U.S. foreign policy. </li></ul><ul><li>Engage constructively to address climate change, reduce weapons proliferation, and promote a more equitable and just global economy. </li></ul><ul><li>Re-engage with the Muslim world, Iran, China, the UN, and the global community. </li></ul>
    21. 21. What YOU Can Do <ul><li>Visit www.fcnl.org </li></ul><ul><li>Sign up for email lists. (Prevent War) </li></ul><ul><li>Write, call, and visit your members of Congress </li></ul><ul><li>Read, listen, learn, teach others </li></ul><ul><li>Support our work. </li></ul>
    22. 23. Your Members of Congress <ul><li>On this slide add information about your Senators and Representative. Questions to consider: </li></ul><ul><li>Which committees do they serve on? </li></ul><ul><li>Do they have particular areas of interest that overlap with your concerns? </li></ul><ul><li>Are there demographics of the state or district that are relevant to your issues? </li></ul><ul><li>Make sure to provide contact information for their Washington and local offices. </li></ul>

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