Expanding the circle of knowledge: The role of longevity and external opportunities in forming the social networks of acad...
Brief context<br />Study population: <br />Group of academic librarians that have regular interaction with each other in a...
To explore common assumptions<br />Older employees are less receptive to innovation <br />Compelling evidence from the aut...
Questions<br />Do the social networks of librarians increase in scope and breadth as a result of length of tenure?<br />If...
Average network size<br />Who do you regularly ask for advice related to your job?<br />
Career span<br />How long have you worked in a library?<br />
Network scope<br />Computed based on physical proximity, organizational proximity, and frequency of interaction (modeled o...
Average number of professional memberships<br />What professional organizations do you belong to?<br />
Outdegreemeasures over career span<br />
Network scope over career span<br />
Professional memberships over career span<br />
Innovation measures by functional area<br />
Professional memberships by functional area<br />
Innovation measures by type of institution<br />
Conclusions<br />The social networks of librarians do increase in scope and breadth as a result of length of tenure<br />S...
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Expanding the circle of knowledge: The role of longevity and external opportunities in forming the social networks of academic librarians

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Presentation given at the 7th Applications of Social Network Analysis Conference in Zurich, Switzerland on September 16, 2010. This is an overview of a followup study to my earlier dissertation research.

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Expanding the circle of knowledge: The role of longevity and external opportunities in forming the social networks of academic librarians

  1. 1. Expanding the circle of knowledge: The role of longevity and external opportunities in forming the social networks of academic librarians<br />H. Frank Cervone, Ph.D.<br />Vice Chancellor for Information Services<br />Purdue University Calumet<br />ASNA 2010 - Thursday, September 16, 2010<br />
  2. 2. Brief context<br />Study population: <br />Group of academic librarians that have regular interaction with each other in a statewide library consortium<br />Basis of questions:<br />Follow up to prior study (Cervone, 2008) on receptivity of academic librarians to innovation<br />Libraries as “sacred cow” cultures (Alvesson, 2000)<br />Three significant factors found to contribute to a greater receptivity to innovation<br />Number of outdegree relations <br />Length of time in career<br />Belonging to professional associations<br />
  3. 3. To explore common assumptions<br />Older employees are less receptive to innovation <br />Compelling evidence from the author’s prior study that may not be the case in librarianship<br />Belonging to professional associations inherently provides access to a larger pool of potential network members<br />As people progress in their careers the likelihood of engaging with new people through professional affiliations increases<br />Staff in larger libraries are more innovative than staff in smaller libraries because they have more ready access to a larger professional advice network<br />
  4. 4. Questions<br />Do the social networks of librarians increase in scope and breadth as a result of length of tenure?<br />If so, how does that scope and breadth change?<br />Does the scope of involvement in professional organizations change as a result of <br />Length of tenure in a career?<br />Function within an organization?<br />If so, how does this affect the social network?<br />Are staff members in larger libraries more receptive to innovation than staff in smaller libraries?<br />A possibility due to access to a larger local professional advice network<br />
  5. 5. Average network size<br />Who do you regularly ask for advice related to your job?<br />
  6. 6. Career span<br />How long have you worked in a library?<br />
  7. 7. Network scope<br />Computed based on physical proximity, organizational proximity, and frequency of interaction (modeled on Cross, 2003)<br />
  8. 8. Average number of professional memberships<br />What professional organizations do you belong to?<br />
  9. 9. Outdegreemeasures over career span<br />
  10. 10. Network scope over career span<br />
  11. 11. Professional memberships over career span<br />
  12. 12. Innovation measures by functional area<br />
  13. 13. Professional memberships by functional area<br />
  14. 14. Innovation measures by type of institution<br />
  15. 15. Conclusions<br />The social networks of librarians do increase in scope and breadth as a result of length of tenure<br />Scope becomes broader<br />Breadth increases to a point<br />Starts to contract approaching retirement<br />The scope of involvement in professional organizations increases as a result of length of tenure in a career<br />This involvement is not a predictor of receptivity to innovation<br />Staff members in larger libraries are no more receptive to innovative than staff in smaller libraries<br />Receptivity to innovation does appear to be related to type of library however<br />

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