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SS3 - Storyboard

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  • 1. 298069066675Classic Mayan Civilization established. Classic Age lasted from 200 B.C. to 900 A.D.00Classic Mayan Civilization established. Classic Age lasted from 200 B.C. to 900 A.D.04762500<br />2980690304165Mayan City-States rise and become urban centers. Tikal in Guatemala 00Mayan City-States rise and become urban centers. Tikal in Guatemala 027559000027940Source: World History: Patterns of Interaction by Beck et al0Source: World History: Patterns of Interaction by Beck et al<br />5829300749300111265430Source: http://www.thelivingmoon.com/43ancients/04images/Pyramid/Tikal_Guatemala_1600.JPG00Source: http://www.thelivingmoon.com/43ancients/04images/Pyramid/Tikal_Guatemala_1600.JPG<br />29711650Mayan City-States rise and become urban centers. Copan in western Honduras 00Mayan City-States rise and become urban centers. Copan in western Honduras 1000<br />-142875314325Source: http://img.xcitefun.net/users/2009/06/93974,xcitefun-copan-ruins-honduras-1.jpg00Source: http://img.xcitefun.net/users/2009/06/93974,xcitefun-copan-ruins-honduras-1.jpg<br />2971165237490Mayan City-States rise and become urban centers. Chichen Itza in Yucatan Peninsula 00Mayan City-States rise and become urban centers. Chichen Itza in Yucatan Peninsula 023749000<br />5682996712724229525229870Source: http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2169/2293092517_39512a27fa.jpg00Source: http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2169/2293092517_39512a27fa.jpg<br />2952115-635Agriculture supported cities. Maize is an example of a primary domesticated crop, and it is also one of the staple foods of Mayans.00Agriculture supported cities. Maize is an example of a primary domesticated crop, and it is also one of the staple foods of Mayans.0000<br />015875Source: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/4a/ResplendentQuetzal.jpg00Source: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/4a/ResplendentQuetzal.jpg2971165255905Trade and exchange of goods supported cities. Quetzal feathers are examples of commodities traded.00Trade and exchange of goods supported cities. Quetzal feathers are examples of commodities traded.026606500<br />6035040483616330233045Source: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/2/28/Zea_mays.jpg00Source: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/2/28/Zea_mays.jpg<br />297116526670Trade and exchange of goods supported cities. Precious metals like jade are examples of commodities traded.00Trade and exchange of goods supported cities. Precious metals like jade are examples of commodities traded.01841500<br />0309880Source: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/0/00/Jadestein.jpg00Source: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/0/00/Jadestein.jpg<br />2971165235585Agriculture and trade led to the accumulation of wealth which eventually resulted to the development of social classes. The king is at the top of the society followed by the nobility which included the priests and leading warriors. Merchants and artisans are next, and at the lowest level are the peasants and slaves.00Agriculture and trade led to the accumulation of wealth which eventually resulted to the development of social classes. The king is at the top of the society followed by the nobility which included the priests and leading warriors. Merchants and artisans are next, and at the lowest level are the peasants and slaves.023622000<br />5829300602996440225425Source: http://www.precolumbianwomen.com/maya-society.jpg00Source: http://www.precolumbianwomen.com/maya-society.jpg<br />2961640-1905Mayan religion: Sculptures of rain and fertility gods on temples show that Mayans worshipped gods.00Mayan religion: Sculptures of rain and fertility gods on temples show that Mayans worshipped gods.-1000<br />0302260Source: http://www.religionfacts.com/mayan_religion/images/uxmal-chac-sculptures-cc-mexicanwave.jpg00Source: http://www.religionfacts.com/mayan_religion/images/uxmal-chac-sculptures-cc-mexicanwave.jpg<br />2980690245110Mayan religion: The Dresden codex, a Mayan text, contains astronomical tables of great accuracy, and it is famous for the Lunar Series and the Venus table. Mayan texts weren’t regarded as sacred unlike the Bible or Quran, but as important records of religious rituals and knowledge.00Mayan religion: The Dresden codex, a Mayan text, contains astronomical tables of great accuracy, and it is famous for the Lunar Series and the Venus table. Mayan texts weren’t regarded as sacred unlike the Bible or Quran, but as important records of religious rituals and knowledge.024701500<br />54498245847087728575228600Source: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/85/Dresden_Codex_p09.jpg00Source: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/85/Dresden_Codex_p09.jpg<br />2885440-1905Mayan religion: The Paris codex, a Mayan text, devoted to Mayan rituals and ceremonies. Mayan texts weren’t regarded as sacred unlike the Bible or Quran, but as important records of religious rituals and knowledge.00Mayan religion: The Paris codex, a Mayan text, devoted to Mayan rituals and ceremonies. Mayan texts weren’t regarded as sacred unlike the Bible or Quran, but as important records of religious rituals and knowledge.0000<br />0315595Source: http://www.hharlestonjr.com/images/pariscodex.jpg00Source: http://www.hharlestonjr.com/images/pariscodex.jpg<br />2990215234315Mayan religion: The Troano codex, a section of the Madrid codex, a Mayan text, with the Cortesianus codex as the other section, is said to have been written after Spanish arrival. Mayan texts weren’t regarded as sacred unlike the Bible or Quran, but as important records of religious rituals and knowledge.00Mayan religion: The Troano codex, a section of the Madrid codex, a Mayan text, with the Cortesianus codex as the other section, is said to have been written after Spanish arrival. Mayan texts weren’t regarded as sacred unlike the Bible or Quran, but as important records of religious rituals and knowledge.1905023622000<br />5541264200660880207010Source: World History: Patterns of Interaction by Beck et al0Source: World History: Patterns of Interaction by Beck et al<br />2856865-3175Mayan religion: A translation of Popol Vuh, a Mayan text, by Francisco Ximénez. Written in Quiche, a highland Maya language, It chronicles the creation of man, the actions of the gods, the origin and history of the Quiché people, and the chronology of their kings down to 1550. Mayan texts weren’t regarded as sacred unlike the Bible or Quran, but as important records of religious rituals and knowledge.00Mayan religion: A translation of Popol Vuh, a Mayan text, by Francisco Ximénez. Written in Quiche, a highland Maya language, It chronicles the creation of man, the actions of the gods, the origin and history of the Quiché people, and the chronology of their kings down to 1550. Mayan texts weren’t regarded as sacred unlike the Bible or Quran, but as important records of religious rituals and knowledge.0000<br />0307975Source: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/b/b2/Popol_vuh.jpg00Source: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/b/b2/Popol_vuh.jpg<br />2971165243205Mayan religion: Sculptures with jaguar headdresses on a Mayan temple in Kabah, Mexico. Mayan’s concept of afterlife consisted primarily of a voyage of the soul through the underworld, filled with evil gods(jaguar). The majority of Maya, including the rulers, went to this underworld. Those who were sacrificed or died at childbirth go to heaven.00Mayan religion: Sculptures with jaguar headdresses on a Mayan temple in Kabah, Mexico. Mayan’s concept of afterlife consisted primarily of a voyage of the soul through the underworld, filled with evil gods(jaguar). The majority of Maya, including the rulers, went to this underworld. Those who were sacrificed or died at childbirth go to heaven.023685500<br />03779520Source: http://www.religionfacts.com/mayan_religion/images/kabah-sculptures-cc-mike-nl.jpg00Source: http://www.religionfacts.com/mayan_religion/images/kabah-sculptures-cc-mike-nl.jpg<br />548640047498099<br />571503876040Source: http://www.2012awareness.com/Maya-Glyphs-Stucco.jpg00Source: http://www.2012awareness.com/Maya-Glyphs-Stucco.jpg30378405715Maya glyph was the writing system of the Mayan civilization. It contained about 800 hieroglyphic symbols, of which some represent whole words while others represent syllables.00Maya glyph was the writing system of the Mayan civilization. It contained about 800 hieroglyphic symbols, of which some represent whole words while others represent syllables.57150-100<br />3037840243205Mayans had a vigesimal (base 20) numerical system. They also independently developed the concept of zero.00Mayans had a vigesimal (base 20) numerical system. They also independently developed the concept of zero.024701500<br />5559552749300550237490Source: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/1/1b/Maya.svg/248px-Maya.svg.png00Source: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/1/1b/Maya.svg/248px-Maya.svg.png<br />03859530Source: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/9/97/Mexico_Cenotes.jpg00Source: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/9/97/Mexico_Cenotes.jpg2971165-3810Mayan religion: Human sacrifices were made to the gods to demonstrate devotion, and appease them. Cenote Sagrado in Chichen Itza is an example. Sacrifices were made to Chaac, the rain god.00Mayan religion: Human sacrifices were made to the gods to demonstrate devotion, and appease them. Cenote Sagrado in Chichen Itza is an example. Sacrifices were made to Chaac, the rain god.0000<br />3123565299085Tzolk’in is the 260-day Mesoamerican calendar made by the Mayan civilization. It is an important component in the society and rituals of the ancient and the modern Maya.00Tzolk’in is the 260-day Mesoamerican calendar made by the Mayan civilization. It is an important component in the society and rituals of the ancient and the modern Maya.<br />03871595Source: http://www.mayacalendar.com/mayadivination/tzolkin.gif00Source: http://www.mayacalendar.com/mayadivination/tzolkin.gif0000<br />55778405664201010<br />2961640213995Haab’ is a 365-day calendar made by the Mayan civilization. Unlike the Tzolk’in, Haab’ approximated the solar year. They calculated it to 365.2420 days which is only .0002 day away from the accepted value.00Haab’ is a 365-day calendar made by the Mayan civilization. Unlike the Tzolk’in, Haab’ approximated the solar year. They calculated it to 365.2420 days which is only .0002 day away from the accepted value.021145500<br />2971165268605The Mesoamerican Long Count calendar, also known as Mayan Long Count calendar, is a non-repeating, base-20 and base-18 calendar.00The Mesoamerican Long Count calendar, also known as Mayan Long Count calendar, is a non-repeating, base-20 and base-18 calendar.-127495500015240Source: http://www.mysticunicorn.com/graphics/P-5.jpg00Source: http://www.mysticunicorn.com/graphics/P-5.jpg<br />03808730Source: http://www.2012thetruth.com/images/La_Mojarra_Inscription_and_Long_Count_date.jpg00Source: http://www.2012thetruth.com/images/La_Mojarra_Inscription_and_Long_Count_date.jpg<br />58293004953001111<br />03867785Source: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/4/47/Map_bonam-1.gif00Source: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/4/47/Map_bonam-1.gif2961640-3810Maya music served many ceremonial functions such as funerals or celebrations after victory in war. Percussion instruments such as drums and maracas were used. Flutes were also used.00Maya music served many ceremonial functions such as funerals or celebrations after victory in war. Percussion instruments such as drums and maracas were used. Flutes were also used.0000<br />504748823710966<br />04172585Source: http://www.religionfacts.com/mayan_religion/images/chichen-itza-observatory-wp.jpg00Source: http://www.religionfacts.com/mayan_religion/images/chichen-itza-observatory-wp.jpg2952115300990Mayan architecture: Observatory in Chichen Itza. The Mayans were skilled astronomers, and they studied celestial bodies such as the Moon and Venus.00Mayan architecture: Observatory in Chichen Itza. The Mayans were skilled astronomers, and they studied celestial bodies such as the Moon and Venus.130480000<br />03870325Source: http://i59.photobucket.com/albums/g316/patrick1952/ChichenItzaBallCourt.jpg00Source: http://i59.photobucket.com/albums/g316/patrick1952/ChichenItzaBallCourt.jpg2961640-3810Mayan architecture: Ballcourt in Chichen Itza. Ball courts were a feature of ancient Maya cities. The games held religious significance.00Mayan architecture: Ballcourt in Chichen Itza. Ball courts were a feature of ancient Maya cities. The games held religious significance.0000<br />56327045415281212<br />300926524765Mayan architecture: A steele is a carved marker that is used to mark special dates or as a building marker. Steele in Copan00Mayan architecture: A steele is a carved marker that is used to mark special dates or as a building marker. Steele in Copan190502857500<br />041910Source: World History: Patterns of Interaction by Beck et al00Source: World History: Patterns of Interaction by Beck et al3009265233680Mayan architecture: Pyramids were religious structures and could be used as tombs. Temple in Tikal.00Mayan architecture: Pyramids were religious structures and could be used as tombs. Temple in Tikal.023749000<br />59893204157091131303787140Source: World History: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/b/bc/Tikal6.jpg00Source: World History: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/b/bc/Tikal6.jpg<br />

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