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Mc connell pp_ch22

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Transcript

  • 1. Umiker's Management Skills for the New Health Care Supervisor, Fifth Edition Charles McConnell
  • 2. Chapter 22 Managing Difficult Employees  
  • 3. A MATTER OF ATTITUDE
    • Most of the time the employees who cause supervisors their greatest frustrations are not the incompetent ones.
    • The problem ones are the people who exhibit an attitude problem: a bad attitude, a poor attitude, a negative attitude, etc.
  • 4. Negative Attitudes May Show In:
    • Low or diminishing productivity
    • High or increasing error rate
    • Repeated minor violations of rules
    • Lack of team spirit or lack of cooperation
    • Public criticism of the organization
    • Periodic threats of resignation
    • Chronic resistance to change
  • 5. Chronic Complaining
    • Potentially harmful instances:
    • (1) when the complainers badmouth the organization in the presence of patients, visitors, clinicians, or other customers
    • (2) when the complaining starts to affect the attitudes and performance of others.
  • 6. Negativists
    • Negativists can often be hard workers who are competent, productive, and even loyal but who harbor a bleak outlook toward most things and people.
    • The negativists lack excitement in life and lack enjoyment at work
  • 7. Know-It-Alls
    • These individuals want you to recognize them as superior.
    • They try to maintain control by accumulating large bodies of knowledge.
    • They are condescending if they know what they are talking about.
    • If you object to what they say, they take it as a personal affront.
  • 8. The Uncooperative Silent Ones
    • These are people whose silence is rooted in fear or suppressed anger.
    • Silence may be preceded by normal conversation until a sensitive area comes up.
    • You are likely to encounter this glum silence during counseling or disciplinary sessions.
  • 9. Super-Sensitive Employees
    • Super-sensitive employees take offense at whatever they perceive as a put-down.
    • They are especially sensitive to criticism.
    • Handle the super-sensitive persons with care, but do not be manipulated by their reactions.
  • 10. Moody People
    • Chronic moodiness or a markedly depressed state calls for professional help.
    • Do not flood these folks with sympathy, this may prolong the moods or lead to the martyr syndrome.
  • 11. Jealous Coworkers
    • Jealousy is common when employees compete for pay, promotions, or recognition.
    • Frustrated people may try to undermine your position or turning others against you.
    • Tell the offending individual to bring his or her complaints to you and you alone.
  • 12. Gossips
    • A little benign gossip is harmless, but when character is attacked or misinformation is spread that affects work or morale, something must be done.
    • Gossips want attention, so supply it in healthy ways.
  • 13. Incessant Talkers and Socializers
    • Break up the little group discussions in the corridors.
    • Give the verbose ones extra assignments.
    • When they learn that too much talk and too little work result in extra assignments, they will usually modify their abuse of time.
  • 14. Employees of Questionable Appearance
    • Be careful how you deal with employees whose appearance—that is, matters of dress and grooming—you personally do not like and of which you disapprove.
  • 15. Employees of Questionable Appearance
    • Is this person’s appearance likely to offend customers or interfere business?
    • Does the individual’s appearance violate any policy or rule?
    • Is there a safety hazard involved?
    • If answers to the foregoing are all No, do nothing.
  • 16. Hostile People
  • 17. Dealing with Sherman Tanks
    • Hear the person out without interruption. Hold your ground. Do not permit physical intimidation
    • Maintain eye contact.
    • Hold yourself erect; a relaxed posture invites aggression.
    • Do not counterattack.
  • 18. Dealing with Sherman Tanks
    • When the individual starts repeating what has already been said, break in and deliver your reply.
    • Each time you are interrupted, call the person on it.
    • Be tentative or noncommittal.
  • 19. Dealing with Sherman Tanks
    • Focus on solving the problems that brought you together.
    • When the complaints you are hearing are legitimate, apologize and move on to solutions.
    • Do not put up with offensive language.
  • 20. Exploders
    • The anger of Sherman Tanks is largely contrived and under their complete control, while the anger of Exploders is real. They are partially to completely out of control.
  • 21. Dealing with Exploders
    • They can sometimes get physical, so handle them with care.
    • Coping with Exploders is a matter of helping them regain self-control.
    • Listen carefully for what set the person off—a “hot button” or emotional trigger—and what it is that the person wants
  • 22. Dealing with Exploders
    • Never become involved in verbal boxing matches in which accusations or threats swing wildly back and forth.
    • Do not try to explain complicated matters while the person is upset.
    • Never take personally what is said to you in fits of temper.
  • 23. Snipers
    • Like Sherman Tanks, Snipers would like to be in control; however, they lack the necessary boldness. The weapons of the Sniper are sarcasm, snide remarks, and sick humor.
  • 24. Dealing with Snipers
    • Your goal is to bring Snipers out into the open and blow them away.
    • Stop what you are doing or saying and call the person on what was just said.
    • Snipers do not function well in one-on-one situations; their camouflage is missing.
  • 25. Passive-Aggressives
    • Passive-aggressives are manipulators who pretend to be helpless while they infuriate their superiors and associates.
  • 26. Dealing with Passive-Aggressives
    • You are not likely to change the personality of the passive-aggressive,
    • insist on behavior that meets your expectations.
    • Do not accept their excuses, and never give them the satisfaction of witnessing the anger or frustration you feel when they upset you.
  • 27. Caution is in Order
    • Use “labels” only to guide your thinking concerning certain behaviors and how to react to them. Never apply a label directly to an individual in speech or writing.

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