Keiser Performance Manual
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Keiser Performance Manual

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Keiser tripple trainer performance manual execises and discriptions

Keiser tripple trainer performance manual execises and discriptions

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Keiser Performance Manual Keiser Performance Manual Document Transcript

  • 4 Keiser Infinity Series Features Safety and versatility is the hallmark of the Infinity Series. Enjoy total functional performance, infinite speeds of movement, infinite angles of movement and infinite loads, with Keiser’s pneumatic technology. The following pages explain basic functional workouts. Read them thoroughly and grasp the power of the Infinity Series, then let your creative juices flow. Fits a wide range of needs. Keiser is ideal for all fitness and rehabilitation participants, from the elderly to the super athlete. Physical therapists and strength coaches have long known that their clients can train speed for better performance, without the damaging effects of impact. Fits a wide range of body types. Short, tall, male, female, husky, slender; all body shapes and sizes are comfortable using the equipment. Adjusts quickly in 1/10 pound increments. No longer do you have to spend time changing weights to fit each person. It is done quickly with the press of a button. Change load throughout the range of motion. Master trainers and experienced fitness advocates immediately see the advantage in fine-tuning a workout for maximum results with Keiser equipment. Limited space requirements. The Infinity Series equipment is compact and versatile. Multiple exercises can be completed at one station. No more wandering around or waiting for the right piece of equipment to open up. Free moving pneumatic technology. Safely increase power output as speed increases allowing for intense functional workouts. Total versatility. Bilaterally and unilaterally work any muscle group safely at any angle, at any resistance, at any speed through the range of motion.
  • 5 WHEN IS A POUND NOT A POUND? Thanks to some basic laws of physics, a pound is not always a pound. When looking at an iron weight, whether in the form of a barbell or a weight stack, one assumes it represents a particular resistance. It does, but only when it is at rest or moving at a constant speed. Once in motion, the changes in speed of movement cause the weight to change. These changes in force can be illustrated by the sensation felt by people riding an elevator. As the elevator starts to move upward, one begins to feel heavier. When it achieves a constant speed, a feeling of a return to normal weight is experienced. As it slows to a stop, one feels lighter. A person standing on a scale would have seen that exact change. Even though actual body weight did not change, the force exerted on the scale did. The same thing happens when a barbell or weight stack is lifted. The force exerted by a barbell or weight stack on the body during an exercise will vary in the same way. This occurs because the barbell is accelerated just as the elevator accelerates the people riding in it. The foundation for this phenomenon may have been encountered in a high school or college classroom. Long before man thought of exercise machines, Sir Isaac Newton showed that this changing force is proportional to the mass or weight one is lifting multiplied by the acceleration (rate of change of speed). F = ma, "F" being the force, "m" mass, and "a" acceleration. Acceleration changes as the speed of movement changes. To attain greater speeds of movement higher accelerations are necessary. Because of this simple formula, it can be seen that if the mass is high (as it is when using iron weight as a resistance) the forces can change greatly depending upon the speed of movement. It is not unusual when a person is moving a weight, to have acceleration forces equal to or greater than the actual weight being lifted. For example, a shot-putter may exert a force in excess of ten times the weight of the shot-put, because of the tremendous acceleration necessary to get the distance. Newton's Law has challenged every designer of a variable resistance machine since its invention in 1898 by Max Herz. When Arthur Jones introduced his Nautilus machines in 1970, he too was plagued by this phenomenon. To reduce the acceleration forces to near zero, Jones had two choices: reduce either the mass or acceleration to near zero. Since iron was his source of resistance, Jones couldn't lower the mass, so his only option was to keep the acceleration near zero. Therefore, he required everyone training on Nautilus machines to train at a speed of out on two seconds and back on four seconds, thus keeping the speed slow enough to make the acceleration forces insignificant. Keiser, on the other hand, chose to do the opposite. Knowing that speed is essential in athletic performance, Keiser chose not to control the acceleration but to reduce the mass. This meant the weight stack had to go, and another form of resistance would have to take its place. Keiser chose the force of Air, one of the most powerful forces on Earth. A small 2 ½ inch diameter cylinder can produce over 500 lbs. of force, but with only 3 lbs. of actual moving weight. This is the secret to the very pure, very consistent, and very controllable resistance of Keiser's Pneumatic Technology. The operation is simple. The heart of the system is the compressor, which provides a source of compressed air that is distributed to each machine. When you depress the right thumb button (+), air flows from the compressor to the cylinder. The longer you hold the button down, the more air flows into the cylinder, thus increasing the force it produces. Once the desired force (resistance) is reached you release the thumb button and the air is trapped in the cylinder. As you begin to move through the concentric (positive) phase of the exercise, the cylinder moves against the air pressure further compressing the air in the cylinder. This is very important, because it does two things.
  • 6 First, the increase in air pressure increases the force produced by the cylinder, which when combined with the mechanical linkage in the system, creates the variable resistance force curve. This is the exact method by which the human body varies its forces. The contractile effort of the muscle changes as it shortens, and the muscular leverage changes as the joint passes through its range of movement. Second, the increase in pressure stores the energy that you expend on your positive stroke to deliver it back to you on a negative or eccentric contraction (unlike a hydraulic machine, which cannot produce a negative or eccentric contraction). Keiser provides a positive and negative resistance just like a weight stack, but without the high impact loads experienced while starting and stopping the weight. To decrease the resistance any time while you're exercising, you simply depress the left thumb button (-) and the air releases, thus reducing the resistance as long as the thumb button is depressed. To illustrate the difference between these two approaches to muscular-skeletal performance, a special Leg Extension machine was built with two independent exercise arms contacting the user's lower legs. One is connected to a weight stack and the other to Keiser's pneumatic cylinder. The cams are made so that the two systems provide the same variable resistance curve at a speed of out on four seconds and back on four seconds. Force sensors are attached to each pad that contacts the user's legs, and wired to a computer that graphs the exact force being applied to the legs by each system as the user extends his or her legs through the range of motion. Unfortunately, these high spikes in resistance most often come at a point in the range of motion that can result in the greatest harm to joints and connective tissue. That's why we've been told for years that high-speed training was dangerous. We know today that speed wasn't the problem. The injuries were caused by the impact loads from the weight equipment being used; they blamed the wrong element. It's just like saying that jumping from an airplane will kill you. It's not the jump from the plane that kills you; it's the fact that you hit the ground going too fast. Once the proper equipment was designed to slow the descent, jumping from a plane was made much safer. You can see the resistance provided by Keiser's Pneumatic Technology remains consistent throughout the various training speeds. This opens up a whole array of training options, not possible with free weights and weight stack machines. The ability to incorporate different speeds of training into a workout allows for speed and power training (power is the combination of strength and speed). It also provides a much safer resistance for older adults and rehabilitation by decreasing the risk of injury and shortening recovery time. In short, Keiser is very hard on muscle (because you can't cheat) and very easy on joints and connective tissue (because of the low impact loads). Strength has been the accepted measurement of athletic performance, primarily because it has been the easiest to measure. Yet, in actual performance, the athlete will probably never use maximum strength. In most cases, speed or a combination of strength and speed (power) will produce greater results than strength alone. Not only has this been proven in athletic competition, but there are also several research studies that prove that power is a better predictor of an older adult's ability to perform the activities of daily living than strength. Power is the key to performance, whether you're young or old. Keiser's Pneumatic Technology is one of the most significant contributions to resistance training in the 20th century. For the first time since Herz received his patent on variable resistance over a century ago, the true benefits of variable resistance can be realized thanks to Keiser's revolutionary machines.
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  • 8 Performance Training Programs The workout protocol for the Infinity Series follows the basic principals of progressive overload. Each of the programs listed are guides to a desired outcome. All of the exercises discussed in this manual may be used with each of the programs. Other added benefits of any of these training protocols using the Keiser In­ finity Series are: Balance, Agility, Acceleration and Deceleration. You may find that some of the exercises work best with a particular program and not another. Once you try each of these programs you will begin to realize the power of the Keiser Infinity Series. Each of the workout programs has a range of sets and repetitions and tempo. This guide can vary, based on your desired outcome. Strength and Power 2 - 4 Sets / 3 - 6 Reps / Tempo: Explosive or Slow This program is intended to develop a strength and power base. By varying your speed you can totally change the exercise. As your speed and load increase you increase your power. Sculpt / Hypertrophy 4 - 5 Sets / 8 - 12 Reps / Tempo: Slow and controlled This program is intended to increase hypertrophy in the muscle. In this program it is best to have a slow and controlled tempo. Core Stability 3 - 4 Sets / 12 - 15 Reps / Tempo: Explosive or Moderate This program is intended to develop true core stability through progressive overload. It is very important to concentrate on stabilizing your torso during all of the exercises. Speed Play 3 - 4 Sets/ 15 -60 Seconds / Tempo: Explosive This program is based on time rather than reps. Focus on good form. If you begin to lose form lower the load not the time. As you see the load increase you will notice a tremendous increase in personal speed and cardiovascular ability.
  • Keiser Infinity Series 9 Basic Foundation of Functional Training Always note the pulley position on each exercise. You may change this position based on flexibility, body type, and goals. In many of the movements described you may come in contact with the cord piece. Avoid excessive cord pressure during the exercise motion. All participants need to consult a physician prior to using any of the following movements on the Infinity Series equipment. Squat Start: Pulley at low position. Hold the grips with hands or belt. Feet balanced shoulder width apart. Downward Phase: Flexion of hips back. Head forward. Chest up. Back flat. Move until knees are at 90 degrees and upper thighs are parallel to the floor. Upward Phase: Stand up maintaining good body position. Lateral Lunge Start: Pulley at low position. Hold the grips with hands or belt. Facing equipment rotate 90 degrees. Squat position. Outward Phase: Step out laterally. Extension at the hip and knee. Head forward. Chest up. Back flat. Inward Phase: Return to start position maintaining proper squat.
  • 10 Row Start: Pulley at mid position. Hold the grips with hands. Face equipment. Squat position. Arms fully extended. Backward Phase: Pull from shoulder blades to start movement. Pull towards mid torso. Avoid leaning back. Forward Phase: Extend arms to straight position. Chest Press Start: Pulley at mid position. Hold the grips with hands. Face away from equipment. Squat position. Hands at shoulder height, elbows up. Forward Phase: Push from chest. Extend arms straight forward. Avoid leaning forward. Backward Phase: Return arms to starting position. Shoulder Press Start: Pulley at low position. Hold the grips with hands. Face away from equipment Feet shoulder width apart, torso erect. Hands at shoulder height, elbows up. Upward phase: Press overhead, extend arms fully. Do not lock elbows. Maintain stable torso position. Avoid leaning back. Downward phase: Return arms to starting position.
  • 11 Arm Curls Start: Pulley at low position. Grips in hands. Face equipment. Feet shoulder width apart, torso erect. Elbows fully extended. Upper arms against ribs. Upward Phase: Bring hands towards shoulder. Keep elbows close to sides. Maintain stable torso position. Avoid leaning back. Downward Phase: Return arms to starting position. Tricep Pushdowns Start: Pulley at upper position. Grips in hands. Face equipment. Feet shoulder width apart, torso erect. Arms in full flexion. Elbows against ribs. Downward Phase: Fully extend elbows. Keep elbows close to side. Maintain stable torso position. Avoid leaning forward. Upward Phase: Return arms to starting position. Leg Abduction Start: Pulley at low position. Place ankle belt on leg furthest away from equipment. Facing equipment rotate 90 degrees. Feet shoulder width apart, torso erect. Place hand on equipment for stability. Outward Phase: Raise outside leg laterally as high as possible. Keep legs straight. Avoid leaning. Inward Phase: Return to start position.
  • 12 Leg Adduction Start: Pulley at low position. Place ankle belt on leg closest to equipment. Facing equipment rotate 90 degrees. Feet shoulder width apart, torso erect. Place hand on equipment for stability. Outward Phase: Pull inside leg laterally as high as possible. Keep legs straight. Avoid leaning. Inward Phase: Return to start position. Hip Extension Start: Pulley at low position. Place ankle belt on leg. Face equipment. Feet shoulder width apart, torso erect. Place hand on equipment for stability. Backward Phase: Pull belted leg back as high as possible. Keep legs straight. Avoid leaning. Forward Phase: Return to start position. Standing Ab Rotation Start: Pulley at mid position. Hold the grip with both hands. Facing equipment rotate 90 degrees. Feet slightly more than shoulder width apart. Arms at chest height, firm and slightly bent. Outward Phase: Moving from torso. Rotate upper torso away from equipment. Keep abs tight. Inward Phase: Return to start position maintaining proper stance.
  • 13 Punching Ab Rotation Start: Pulley at mid position. Hold the grip in one hand. Facing equipment rotate 90 degrees. Feet slightly more than shoulder width apart. Hand at shoulder height with elbow up. Outward phase: Moving from torso. Rotate torso away from equipment. Punch in a slightly upward motion. Inward Phase: Return to start position by rotating torso. Leaning Ab Rotation Start: Pulley at high position. Hold the grip with both hands. Facing equipment rotate 90 degrees. Feet slightly more than shoulder width apart. Arms at 90 degrees with hands near shoulder closest to equipment. Outward Phase: Moving from torso. Rotate upper torso away from equipment. Hands move across body from shoulder position to opposite knee. Keep abs tight. Inward Phase: Return to start position maintaining proper stance. Forward Lunge Start: Pulley at mid to low position. Hold the grips with hands and face away from equipment. Forward Phase: Take a natural step forward. Flex the hip back. Head forward. Chest up. Back flat. Move until the knee is at 90 degrees and upper thigh is parallel to the floor. Backward Phase: Stand up maintaining good body position.
  • 14 Single Leg Squat Start: Pulley at low position. Hold the grip with hand or belt. Facing equipment. Stand on one leg. Downward Phase: Flexion of hip and back. Head forward. Chest up. Back flat. Move until the knee is at 90 degrees and upper thigh is parallel to the floor. Upward Phase: Stand up maintaining good body position. Straight Punch Start: Pulley at mid position. Hold the grips with hands. Face away from equipment. Half Squat position. Legs slightly wider than shoulder width apart. Hands at shoulder height, elbows up. Motion: Continuously punch forward at slight upward angle. Extend arm straight forward. Avoid leaning forward. Running in Place Start: Pulley at low position. Hold the grips with hands or belt. Face away from equipment. Hands or belt at waist height. Motion: Run in place.
  • 15 Upper Cut Start: Pulley at low position. Hold the grips with both hands. Face away from equipment. Hand at waist height. Half Squat position. Legs slightly wider than shoulder width. Motion: With elbows fixed at 90 degrees punch in continuous upper cut motion. Avoid leaning forward. Explosive Hip Flexion Start: Pulley at low position. Place ankle belt on leg. Face away from equipment. Stand on unbelted leg. Belted foot extended behind. Motion: Continuously raise knee from hip. Upper thigh parallel to floor at top of motion. Squat Jump Start: Pulley at low position. Hold the grips with hands or belt. Face away from equipment. Hands or belt at waist height. Squat. Motion: Continuously jump to full body extension. Soft landings to squat.
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  • 22 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means without prior written permission of the publisher. Program Design by Carl Davison.