The Value and Power of Distributed Energy in Minnesota

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How clean, local energy can help Minnesota achieve electricity self-reliance and maximize the state's economic benefits.

A presentation by John Farrell, director of the Energy Self-Reliant States and Communities program at the Institute for Local Self-Reliance to a forum hosted by Think Again MN on 9/27/11.

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The Value and Power of Distributed Energy in Minnesota

  1. 1. Clean, Local EnergyThe Value and Power of Distributed Energy in Minnesota John Farrell, Director Energy Self-Reliant States and Communities program jfarrell@ilsr.org 612.276.3456 x210 Presentation on Sept. 23, 2011
  2. 2. ILSR’s Unique Perspective Yesterday Tomorrow Centralized Power Clean, local power Solar PV power plant Storage Storage Transmission network Storage Storage House Local CHP plant Distribution network House with domestic CHP Wind powerFactory Commercial plant building
  3. 3. Why Clean, Local Energy? Enormous Potential 31 states could be electricity self-reliant
  4. 4. Why Clean, Local Energy? Enormous Potential? 2,500%
  5. 5. Why Clean, Local Energy? MN Renewable Potential CHP 4% Hydro Rooftop Solar 1% 24% 71%
  6. 6. Why Clean, Local Energy? MN Renewable Potential CHP 4% Hydro Rooftop Solar 1% 24% Wind 71%
  7. 7. Why Clean, Local Energy? MN Renewable Potential CHP 4% Hydro Rooftop Solar 1%Wind: 2400% of state electricity use 24% Wind 71%
  8. 8. Value of Clean, Local Energy • Cost for power • Value of energy • Value of jobs and economic development • Value of local ownership
  9. 9. Value of Clean, Local Energy Price per kWh CHP 4% Hydro Average Cost, 2011 Rooftop Solar 1% 24% Wind 11 cents Solar 23 cents Wind 71%
  10. 10. Value of Clean, Local Energy Price per kWh Including federal tax credit and depreciation Average Price: Minnesota, 2011 Average Cost, 2011 Residential 11 cents Commercial 8 cents Wind 7 cents Industrial 6 cents Solar 14 cents
  11. 11. Value of Clean, Local Energy Jobs Putting Renewables to Work: How Many Jobs Can the Clean Energy Industry Create? (UC Berkeley)
  12. 12. Value of Clean, Local Energy Economic Engine Rooftop Solar 10% $22 billion 50,000 jobs Wind 90% Total GDP: $258 billion
  13. 13. Value of Clean, Local EnergyAbsentee Ownership = 2 nd gear Lost $22 billion $33 billion 50,000 jobs 50,000 jobs Total GDP: $258 billion
  14. 14. Value of Clean, Local Energy Local Benefits Local Ownership Boosts Impact of Renewables Economic Development Impacts of Community Wind Projects: A Review and Empirical Evaluation (NREL)
  15. 15. Value of Clean, Local EnergyLocal Ownership = high gear Returned $56 billion $33 billion 100,000 jobs 50,000 jobs Total GDP: $258 billion
  16. 16. Value of Clean, Local Energy Public Support
  17. 17. Value of Clean, Local Energy Public SupportNo local ownership 16% positive Local ownership 45% positive 0 25 50 75 100 very negative negative neutral positive very positive Attitude towards increased use of local wind energy
  18. 18. Barriers to Clean, Local Energy • Tax incentives • Utility “grid lock” • Project financing
  19. 19. Barriers to Clean, Local Energy Tax Incentives I want you if you have taxable income City Nonprofit Cooperative
  20. 20. Barriers to Clean, Local Energy Utility “Grid Lock”
  21. 21. Barriers to Clean, Local Energy Financing
  22. 22. Opportunities for Clean, Local Energy Cash Incentives Open Utility Data CLEAN Contracts
  23. 23. Thank you!John Farrell energyselfreliantstates.org jfarrell@ilsr.org johnffarrell 612-276-3456 x210

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