The Missing Piece in Clean Local Energy
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The Missing Piece in Clean Local Energy

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A presentation by ILSR Senior Researcher John Farrell to the Biocycle Conference, discussing how biogas electricity and heat could help support variable renewable electricity and boost renewable......

A presentation by ILSR Senior Researcher John Farrell to the Biocycle Conference, discussing how biogas electricity and heat could help support variable renewable electricity and boost renewable energy use for building heating. Given on Oct. 29, 2012 in St. Louis, MO.

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  • 1. The Missing Piece Image credit Shel Silverstein of America’s Clean Local Energy Transformation John Farrell, Senior ResearcherPresentation to Biocycle Conference on Oct. 29, 2012
  • 2. How Much of Missouri’s Power from Rooftop Solar? ?% Residential and Commercial roofs
  • 3. How Much of Missouri’s Power from Rooftop Solar? 21% Residential and Commercial roofs
  • 4. How Much Power from Local, Rooftop Solar? 23% 21% 18% 24% 19% 19% 21% 24% 21% 23% 25% 22% 15% 14% 23% 23% 20% 12% 18% 24% 51% 21% 18% 20% 26% 38%52% 41% 17% 19% 11% 24% 25% 21% 19% 28% 23% 49% 28% 19% 26% 24% 22% 20% 31% 23% 35% Potential Percent of Electricity 23% from Rooftop Solar PV 42% 0 to 10% 10 to 25% 25 to 50% 49% Residential and Commercial roofs 50 to 100%
  • 5. How Much Power from Local Wind? 116% 109% 297% 780% 27,000% 28,000% 311% 3200% 543% 912% 12% 35,000% 116% 14,000% 478% 3% 5200% 14% 1% 2% 97% 14,000% 541% 223% 11% 269%52% 2900% 726% 2% 25% 9% 9700% 1500% 2% 3% 2% 95% 4100% 300% 8900% 4% 0% 2% 1% 10% 2500% Potential Percent of Electricity from Onshore Wind Power 0% 0 to 10% 0% 10 to 25% 25 to 50% 50 to 100% 0% 100 meters, 30% c.f. or better 100% or more
  • 6. How Much Power from Local Renewables? 32 states - 100%+ 9 states - 50%+ Potential Percent of Electricity from Renewables 0 to 10% 10 to 25% 25 to 50% 50 to 100% 100% or more
  • 7. Transformation Yesterday Tomorrow Centralized Power Clean, local power Solar PV power plant Storage Storage Transmission network Storage Storage House Local CHP plant Distribution network House with domestic CHP Wind powerFactory Commercial plant building
  • 8. 10¢ •prevent blackouts 5¢ •reduce pollution •create jobs 0¢ 0¢ $4/Watt •on-site/near demand •lower transmission losses -5¢ •reduce dist. system stress •hedge against fuel prices •avoided cost -10¢ -15¢ 4¢ How the utility values distributed-20¢ -20¢ Cost of solar Energy value generation Grid benefits Social benefits Distributed Solar Power Worth Far More Than Electrons | Energy Self-Reliant States - http://tinyurl.com/3tqmerh
  • 9. 10¢ •prevent blackouts 5¢ •reduce pollution •create jobs 0¢ 0¢ •on-site/near demand •lower transmission losses -5¢ •reduce dist. system stress •hedge against fuel prices •avoided cost -10¢ 8.5¢ But it’s -15¢ 4¢ worth-20¢ -20¢ more Cost of solar Energy value Grid benefits Social benefits Distributed Solar Power Worth Far More Than Electrons | Energy Self-Reliant States - http://tinyurl.com/3tqmerh
  • 10. 10¢ and more •prevent blackouts 5¢ •reduce pollution •create jobs 0¢ •on-site/near demand 0¢ •lower transmission losses 12.4¢ -5¢ •reduce dist. system stress •hedge against fuel prices •avoided cost -10¢ 8.5¢ -15¢ 4¢-20¢ -20¢ Cost of solar Energy value Grid benefits Social benefits Distributed Solar Power Worth Far More Than Electrons | Energy Self-Reliant States - http://tinyurl.com/3tqmerh
  • 11. It’s Real$0.15$0.12$0.09$0.06 Local capacity value$0.03 7¢ Avoided transmission access Environmental Avoided transmission losses $0 Brown energy replacement Palo Alto, CA, municipal utility Feed-In Tariff for PV in Palo Alto, Calif. Imminent: http://tinyurl.com/72sxgsb
  • 12. It’s Real$0.15 }$0.12 6¢ per kWh$0.09 in addition to electricity$0.06 Local capacity value$0.03 7¢ Avoided transmission access Environmental Avoided transmission losses $0 Brown energy replacement Palo Alto, CA, municipal utility Feed-In Tariff for PV in Palo Alto, Calif. Imminent: http://tinyurl.com/72sxgsb
  • 13. Jobs per Megawatt Solar PV Wind CoalNatural Gas 0 2 4 6 8 10 Construction, manufacturing, and installation Ongoing maintenance and fuel Putting Renewables to Work: How Many Jobs Can the Clean Energy Industry Create? (UC Berkeley)
  • 14. Local Economic Impact Not local Up to 3.4x higher Local ownership Economic Development Impacts of Community Wind Projects: A Review and Empirical Evaluation (NREL)
  • 15. Not local -44% +77% net approval LocalOwnership +33% 0 25 50 75 100 very negative negative neutral positive very positiveAttitude towards increased use of local wind energy
  • 16. Jobs Clean, Local Energy Votes MoneyPhoto credits: (wind) Flickr user ali_pk, (solar, above) Ian-S, (solar, below) MN CERTS, (money) Flickr user epSos.de
  • 17. Image credit Shel Silverstein
  • 18. http://www.abc.net.au/science/articles/2010/12/02/3081889.htm
  • 19. Biogas or Biomass CHPhttp://www.abc.net.au/science/articles/2010/12/02/3081889.htm
  • 20. What’s Missing?Renewable energy policy 17% Solar/wind electricity 10%
  • 21. Current RE policy 17% Solar/wind electricity 10% Geothermal electricity Micro hydropower
  • 22. Current RE policy 17% Solar/wind electricity 10% Geothermal electricity Micro hydropower Ground-source geothermal Solar heat (e.g. hot water)
  • 23. Current RE policy 17% Solar/wind electricity 10% Geothermal electricity Micro hydropower Ground-source geothermal Solar heat (e.g. hot water) Biomass CHP Biogas Heat
  • 24. Current RE policy 17% Solar/wind electricity 10% Geothermal electricity Micro hydropower Ground-source geothermal 100% Solar heat (e.g. hot water) 100% Biomass CHP Biogas Heat Biogas Fuel Cells Renewable NG
  • 25. States with Renewable Heat Policies An Overview of Renewable Heating in the United States: Policy and Market Trends
  • 26. States with Renewable Heat Policies (that offset non-electricity) An Overview of Renewable Heating in the United States: Policy and Market Trends
  • 27. Biogas Policies Biogas Energy CLEAN Contracts (Feed-In Tariffs) Electricity, Heat, and CogenerationEnhanced Renewable Electricity Standards Pipeline Renewable Renewable Natural Natural Gas Gas Standards Biogas: Rethinking the Midwest’s Potential
  • 28. What’s Missing?Biogas and Biomass for: Flexible electricity Renewable heat Look for success: Germany, Denmark