Open Access
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Presentation on Open Access delivered at Open Access & Agricultural Repositories : A Joint workshop of VOA3R & agINFRA projects (18th October 2012. Limassol, Cyprus)

Presentation on Open Access delivered at Open Access & Agricultural Repositories : A Joint workshop of VOA3R & agINFRA projects (18th October 2012. Limassol, Cyprus)

Statistics

Views

Total Views
1,396
Views on SlideShare
1,287
Embed Views
109

Actions

Likes
3
Downloads
8
Comments
0

2 Embeds 109

http://aims.fao.org 108
http://unjobs.org 1

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment
  • This is the Limited Access and Limited Research Impact Cycle as it was in the paper era, and still is todaym in the online era: Within a 12-18 month cycle, the research is written up as the pre-refereeing preprint. The preprin t is submitted to a refereed journal for peer review. The preprint is revised in accordance with the referees’ feedback. The final, accepted draft, the postprint is published. If the would-be user’s university has toll-access, they access it. Some of these accesses lthen ead to use and citation in a new research cycle
  • To maximise research access, supplement the existing system: Do as before, but also: Self-archive the preprint in your university’s Eprint Archive, so every would-be user can access it. Self-archive the postprint in your university’s Eprint Archive, so every would-be user can access it. Research access is maximized and so research impact is maximized.

Open Access Open Access Presentation Transcript

  • OPEN ACCESS Imma Subirats knowledge and information management officer FAO of the United Nations imma.subirats@fao.org Open Access & Agricultural Repositories A Joint workshop of VOA3R & agINFRA projects 18th October 2012. Limassol, Cyprus
  • WHAT IS THE OBJECTIVE OF THIS PRESENTATION? To introduce … To clarify doubts about … To contextualize… ... the Open Access to Scientific Literature Open Access & Agricultural Repositories . 18th October, Limassol (Cyprus)
  • SUMMARY What is Open Access to Scientific Literature Which are the ways to provide Open Access Chronology about Open Access Existing tools for implementing repositories A short overview about copyright Open Access & Agricultural Repositories . 18th October, Limassol (Cyprus)
  • A Brief Introduction toOpen Access
  • WHAT IS OPEN ACCESS?“Open-access (OA) literature is digital, online, free of charge, and free of most copyright and licensing restrictions. What makes it possible is the internet and the consent of the author or copyright-holder” http://www.earlham.edu/~peters/fos/brief.htm OA is compatible with copyright, peer review, print, preservation, prestige, career-advancement, indexing, and other features and supportive services associated with conventional scholarly literature Open Access & Agricultural Repositories . 18th October, Limassol (Cyprus)
  • THAT MEANS…. OA maximises:research visibility OA maximises:research visibility research usage research usage research uptake research uptake research applications research applications research impact research impact research productivity research productivity research progress research progress research funding research funding research manageability research manageability by maximising by maximising research accessibility research accessibility
  • OPEN ACCESS TO WHAT?ESSENTIAL: OPTIONAL: Slides for Promoting OA Mandates and Metrics (because these are not all author give-aways, written to all 2.5 million annual only for usage and impact): 1. Books research articles 2. Textbooks 3. Magazine articles published in all 25,000 peer- 4. Newspaper articles reviewed journals 5. Music 6. Video (and peer-reviewed conferences) 7. Software 8. “Knowledge” in all scholarly and scientific disciplines, worldwide (or because author’s choice to self-archive can only be encouraged, not required in all cases): 9. Data 10. Unrefereed Preprints Open Access & Agricultural Repositories . 18th October, Limassol (Cyprus)
  •  risingprice of scientific journals • Barriers for the access to information • the impact factor in the scientific community is negatively influenced
  • OPEN ACCESS: WHY? Accessing articles universally and freely  Maximizing the impact and access to research  Improving and enhancing the scientific progress  Contributing to the prestige / maintenance of Universities and Research Centers Retain the copyright of the authors of their own intellectual work Consequently…  Readers / scientists can be more effective  Libraries can meet all the needs of their user  Society does not lose information (scientific heritage)  Authors get the recognition that they wish Open Access & Agricultural Repositories . 18th October, Limassol (Cyprus)
  • Kwasik & Fulda (2005) http://www.istl.org/05-summer/internet.html
  • Two ways to provideOpen Access
  • TWO WAYSGreen OA Self-Archiving TTheGreen he G ree way is r rrese rcher n wayis foor es ea Authors self-archive the archerstoodepofsit s t aalltheir pu ll th de articles they publish in peer- blishe p eir publish d jouosit aaricles in t ed journal rttic rnal reviewed journals le heir wn inssitutions in theiroown in ttitution Open s O Ac s p c es s Reep sitoren Access R poos y. Grre n Ope itory. Geeen Ope Acce n ss ddep nds n Access epee onGold OA Publishing oonthe rese nds only n th arch e researchcomm ly Authors publish in OA unity communit y journals (some still recovering costs through institutional subscriptions, others through author/institutional publication charges) Open Access & Agricultural Repositories . 18th October, Limassol (Cyprus)
  • L im ite d A c c e s s : L im ite d R e s e a r c h I m p a c t Impact cycle begins: Researchers write Research is pre-refereeing done “Pre-Print” Slides for Promoting OA Mandates and Metrics12-18 Months Submitted to Journal Pre-Print reviewed by Peer Experts – “Peer- Review” Pre-Print revised by article’s Authors Refereed “Post-Print” Accepted, Certified, Published by Journal Researchers can access the Post-Print if their university has a subscription to the Journal New impact cycles: Por Tim Brody New research builds on existing research
  • M a x im iz e d R e s e a r c h A c c e s s a n d I m p a c t T h r o u g h S e lf - A r c h iv in g Impact cycle Researchers write begins: pre-refereeing Research is done “Pre-Print” Pre-Print is self- archived in Slides for Promoting OA Mandates and Metrics University’s Eprint Archive12-18 Months Submitted to Journal Post-Print is self- Pre-Print reviewed by Peer archived in Experts – “Peer-Review” University’s Eprint Pre-Print revised by Archive article’s Authors Refereed “Post-Print” Accepted, Certified, Published by Journal New impact cycles: Self-archived research impact is greater (and faster) because Researchers can access the access is maximized Post-Print if their university (and accelerated) has a subscription to the Journal New impact cycles: Por Tim Brody New research builds on existing research
  • THE GOLD ROAD To publish articles in an open-access journal whenever a suitable one exists What is an open access journal?  Copyright retained by the author  Use a funding model that does not charge readers or their institutions for access not charge subscriptions or fees for online access  Instead, they look to other sources to fund peer-review and publication (e.g., publication charges). Critical issue : being economically sustainable Open Access & Agricultural Repositories . 18th October, Limassol (Cyprus)
  • OA JOURNAL BUSINESS MODELS (1)1. Advertising to advertise on the journals web site or article pages in order to generate income to help support the journal2. Endowments to build an endowment and use the annual interest to cover its expenses3. Fund-raising to solicit donations, periodically or continuously.4. Hybrid OA journals to publish some OA articles and some non-OA articles, when the choice between the two is the authors rather than the editors.5. Institutional subsidies to subsidize an OA journal, in whole or part, directly or indirectly Open Access & Agricultural Repositories . 18th October, Limassol (Cyprus)
  • OA JOURNAL BUSINESS MODELS Source: http://oad.simmons.edu/oadwiki/OA_journal_business_models (2)6. Membership dues to use membership dues to support an OA journal, in whole or part7. Priced editions to provide OA to one edition and sell access to another edition. The OA edition should contain the full text and other information (charts, illustrations, etc.), but the priced edition may appear earlier in time or include extra features, such as print.8. Publication fees to charge a fee upon acceptance of an article for publication9. Submission fees to charge a fee for evaluating a submitted paper, whether or not the paper is later accepted10. Volunteer effort to use unpaid volunteers for some of the work in producing the journal
  • THE GREEN ROAD Open OpenAcc Acces A ess rch ‘acces s Archving is ‘acces ’ m i iving isanSelf-archiving not a s at not a‘pub s’ mater, ‘pubicati tter, l lic o an ation’mat n’ mater. tter. To self-archive is to deposit a digital document in a publicly accessible website, preferably a repository. Repositories Depositing involves a simple web interface where the depositor copies/pastes in the "metadata" (date, o A repository is a collection of digital author-name, title, journal-name, etc.) documents. and then attaches the full-text o A repository is not just a catalogue: document. it must store full text documents + It is a supplement to, not a substitute preservation + durability for Scientific publication. o Authors don’t publish in a repository! Open Access & Agricultural Repositories . 18th October, Limassol (Cyprus)
  • OPEN ARCHIVES INITIATIVE (OAI) In 1999 the OAI was launched, parallel to the Open Access Movement What is OAI?  Develops and promoted interoperability solutions that aims to facilitate the efficient dissemination of content  Provides the technical means to support the Open Access Movement What is OAI-PMH?  OAI protocol for metadata harvesting  A way for an archive to share its metadata with harvesters which will offer searches across the data of many OAI-Compliant Archives. Open Access & Agricultural Repositories . 18th October, Limassol (Cyprus)
  • TWO LEVELS OF PARTICIPATION Data provider  administer system that support the OAI protocol as a means of exposing metadata about the content.  A document repository can become a data provider Service provider  harvest using OAI-PMH requests to data providers and uses the metadata as a basis for building value-added services  Examples: OAIster or AGRIS Database What does “Open” mean?  “open” from the architectural perspective – defining and promoting machine interfaces that facilitate the availability of content from a variety of providers (FAQ - OAI, 1999) Open Access & Agricultural Repositories . 18th October, Limassol (Cyprus)
  • REGISTRIES OF DATA AND SERVICE PROVIDERS OpenDOAR  Registry of Open Access Repositories (1714) http://www.opendoar.org/ OAI registered data and service providers  OAI conforming repositories (1314) http://www.openarchives.org/Register/BrowseSites  Service providers (34) http://www.openarchives.org/service/listproviders.html CIARD Ring  Registry of Open Access Repositories in Agriculture (33) http://ring.ciard.net/ Open Access & Agricultural Repositories . 18th October, Limassol (Cyprus)
  • Source: http://www.earlham.edu/~peters/fos/timeline.htm Timeline of the Open Access Movement
  • OCTOBER 1990. TIM BERNERS-LEE WROTE FIRST WEB CLIENT ANDSERVER (RELEASED MARCH 1991). ON NOVEMBER 12, 1990,BERNERS-LEE PUBLISHED WORLDWIDEWEB: PROPOSAL FOR AHYPERTEXT PROJECT, AND ON NOVEMBER 13, 1990, HE WROTE THEFIRST WEB PAGE.MAY 17, 1991. WORLD WIDE WEB STANDARD RELEASED BY CERNAND TIM BERNERS-LEE. Open Access & Agricultural Repositories . 18th October, Limassol (Cyprus)
  • APRIL 30, 1993. CERN ANNOUNCED THAT IT WAS PUTTINGTHE BASIC WEB SOFTWARE INTO THE PUBLIC DOMAIN,RELINQUISHING ALL INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS TO IT,AND GRANTING PERMISSION FOR ALL TO "USE, DUPLICATE,MODIFY AND REDISTRIBUTE" IT WITHOUT CHARGE.NOVEMBER 1993. CERN LAUNCHED ITS PREPRINT SERVER.
  • JUNE 27, 1994. SELF-ARCHIVING FIRST PROPOSED BYSTEVAN HARNAD. PUBLISHINGSCHOLARLY JOURNALS ATTHE CROSSROADS: A SUBVERSIVE PROPOSAL FORELECTRONIC PUBLISHING
  • MARCH 1997. SCIELO (SCIENTIFIC ELECTRONIC LIBRARYONLINE) WAS LAUNCHED BY THE SÃO PAULO SCIENCEFOUNDATION (FAPESP) AND THE LATIN AMERICA ANDCARIBBEAN CENTER ON HEALTH SCIENCES INFORMATION(BIREME).MAY 12, 1997. RESEARCH PAPERS IN ECONOMICS (REPEC)LAUNCHED BY THOMAS KRICHEL.
  • 1999. THE OPEN ARCHIVES INITIATIVE (OAI) ISLAUNCHED.OCTOBER 22, 1999. SANTE FE CONVENTION ISSUED.
  • FEBRUARY 2000. PUBMED CENTRAL (FREE FULL-TEXT ARTICLES)LAUNCHED TO SUPPLEMENT PUBMED (FREE CITATIONS ANDABSTRACTS)SEPTEMBER 29, 2000. SOUTHAMPTON UNIVERSITY RELEASEDEPRINTS, ITS OAI-COMPLIANT SOFTWARE FOR EPRINT ARCHIVING.
  • JANUARY 15, 2001. WIKIPEDIA LAUNCHED BY JIMMY WALESDECEMBER 10, 2001. CITEBASE IS LAUNCHED BY TIM BRODYAND SOUTHAMPTON UNIVERSITY.
  • 2002, A DECISIVE YEAR (1) February 14, 2002. Budapest Open Access Initiative (BOAI) launched by the Open Society Institute. February 25, 2002. OAIster launched by the University of Michigan Libraries Digital Library Production Services. May 15, 2002. Creative Commons launched by Lawrence Lessig. August 1, 2002. Project RoMEO (Rights MEtadata for Open archiving) launched by JISC-FAIR.
  • 2002, A DECISIVE YEAR (2) August 15, 2002. CERN released CDSWare, its OAI-compliant open- source software for document servers. November 4, 2002. MIT released DSpace, its OAI-compliant open- source software for archiving eprints and other academic content. November 8, 2002. The Public Knowledge Project released Open Journal Systems, its open-source journal management and publishing software. December 17, 2002. The Public Library of Science received a $9 million grant from the Moore Foundation for open-access publishing and announced its first two open-access journals.
  • MAY 1, 2003. FEDORA (FLEXIBLE EXTENSIBLE DIGITAL OBJECTAND REPOSITORY ARCHITECTURE) VERSION 1.0 WAS LAUNCHEDBY THE UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA AND CORNELL UNIVERSITY.MAY 12, 2003. THE DIRECTORY OF OPEN ACCESS JOURNALSLAUNCHED BY LUND UNIVERSITY.OCTOBER 22, 2003. THE BERLIN DECLARATION ON OPEN ACCESSTO KNOWLEDGE IN THE SCIENCES AND HUMANITIES WASRELEASED BY THE MAX PLANCK SOCIETY AND EUROPEANCULTURAL HERITAGE ONLINE.
  • 2004…2006, THE PUBLISHERS MOVED June 3, 2004. Elsevier announced its new policy permitting authors to post the final editions of their full-text Elsevier articles to their personal web sites or institutional repositories. The policy was officially announced on June 3 but first publicized on May 27. July 3, 2004. Springer launched its Open Choice hybrid journal program. February 24, 2005. Blackwell Publishing launched its Online Open hybrid journal program. July 1, 2005. Oxford University Press launched its Oxford Open hybrid journal program. May 24, 2006. Elsevier launched its Sponsored-Article hybrid journal model. August 12, 2006. Cambridge University Press launched the Cambridge Open Option hybrid journal program.
  • Tools for theimplementation ofdata providers
  • FUNCTIONALITIES To capture and describe digital material using a workflow To provide an interface to deposit/upload documents in online repositories of documents To preserve documents To expose metadata via OAI-PMH  By Default: unqualified DC  But strongly recommended the use of other metadata standards Open Access & Agricultural Repositories . 18th October, Limassol (Cyprus)
  • EXAMPLE OF WORKFLOW Open Access & Agricultural Repositories . 18th October, Limassol (Cyprus)
  • Traditional catalogues Traditional catalogues Document repository software Document repository software Only metadata o Manages full text and management and one or metadata more than one link to o Easy upload of full digital documents texts by authors Runs also with limited o Large and active user computing power (in community (OS) some cases) o Strong preservation Nomanagement of policy document flow o Ready to be used Used by librarians Open Access & Agricultural Repositories . 18th October, Limassol (Cyprus)
  • Overview to copyright
  • COPYRIGHT A bundle of exclusive rights which the law gives to authors and creators to control certain activities relating to the use, dissemination and public performance of their original works Copyright protects the intellectual standing and economic rights of creators and publishers of all literary, dramatic, artistics, musical, audio-visual and electronic works, i.e. Computer programs and electronic databases Open Access & Agricultural Repositories . 18th October, Limassol (Cyprus)
  • COPYRIGHT HOLDER Copyright gives the copyright holder (usually the creator), certain exclusive rights for a period of time:  To reproduce the work  To prepare derivate works  To distribute copies for sale  To perform AV workds publicy  To display musical and artistic works publicy  To prevents othersfrom using the works without authorization Open Access & Agricultural Repositories . 18th October, Limassol (Cyprus)
  • WHO OWNS THE (Justin, 2009) COPYRIGHT? The person authoring the work generally owns the copyright In some case, the employer owns the copyright Copyright ownership may be transferred, e.g. Author to publisher Open Access & Agricultural Repositories . 18th October, Limassol (Cyprus)
  • SHERPA/ROMEO RoMEO is a searchable database of publisher policies on the self- archiving of journal articles on the web and in Open Access repositories. Each entry provides a summary of the publishers policy, including what version of an article can be deposited, where it can be deposited, and any conditions that are attached to that deposit.
  • EXAMPLE IN ROMEO : GREEN
  • EXAMPLE IN ROMEO : BLUE
  • EXAMPLE IN ROMEO:YELLOW
  • CREATIVE COMMONS Non profit corporation allowing content creators to assign their own rules for their own content Provides free licenses and other legal tools to mark creative work with the freedom the creator wants it to carry http://creativecommons.org/ Open Access & Agricultural Repositories . 18th October, Limassol (Cyprus)
  • ORIGINAL LICENCES  You let the others copy, distribute, display and perform the work and make derivative works based on it only if they give credit the way you request  You let the others copy, distribute, display, and perform the work and make derivative works based on it only for noncommercial purposes.  You let the others copy, distribute, display and perform only verbatim copies of the work, not derivative works based on it.  You let the others distribute derivative works only under a license identical to the license that governs the original work. Open Access & Agricultural Repositories . 18th October, Limassol (Cyprus)
  • COMBINATION OF LICENSES The mixture of these conditions produces sixteen possible combinations, of which eleven are valid Creative Commons licenses and five are not. Of the five invalid combinations, four include both the "nd" and "sa" clauses, which are mutually exclusive; and one includes none of the clauses. Of the eleven valid licenses, the five that lack the "by" clause have been phased out because 98% of licensors requested Attribution, though they do remain available for reference on the website. Open Access & Agricultural Repositories . 18th October, Limassol (Cyprus)
  • Source: http://creativecommons.org/about/licenses/LICENSE YOUR WORK
  • Source: http://creativecommons.org/about/licenses/LICENSE YOUR WORK
  • Thank you for your attention Imma.subirats@fao.org Open Access & Agricultural Repositories . 18th October, Limassol (Cyprus)