UndergroundRailroadEDU 310Authors:KristenLauren MarkTina Rebekah<br />
Transportation<br />
Communication<br />Quilts-Different patterns <br />represented different meanings<br />Songs- Words that were put<br /> to...
Whenever Tubman led a group of slaves to freedom, she placed herself in great danger. There was a bounty offered for her c...
Lewiston’s History Coming to Life<br />Sally Barton- Tryon<br />Josiah Tryon<br />
Interview with Josiah Tryon<br />
Interview with Sally Barton-Tryon<br />
   Where they lived.<br />They lived in Tryon’s Folly which is known for the 7 cellars.<br />Sally’s husband, Amos, built ...
Where are they now?<br />(all located in the First Presbyterian Church Cemetery in Lewiston)<br />   Sally Barton’s Tomb S...
Look very close….<br />
Do you want to know a secret???<br />
“Though some may fail,those who try on and on will succeed. Sometimes Folly leads to freedom, and the rabbit escapes from ...
It’s your time to act out the voices of so many who actually traveled to the underground railroad.<br />Let us divide up c...
How did this make you feel?<br />What would you have done differently if were Harriet Tubman?<br />What is something new t...
Standards<br />NY- New York State Standards<br />• Subject: Social Studies (1996)<br />• Learning Standard 1 : History of ...
References<br />Interviews with Tim Henderson and Eva Nickels from the Art Council in Lewiston<br />Freedom Crossing by Ma...
Lewiston Art Council<br />Interview: Josiah Tryon- Tim Henderson<br />Interview: Sally Barton- Eva Nickels<br />Pictures/ ...
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Underground pp

  1. 1. UndergroundRailroadEDU 310Authors:KristenLauren MarkTina Rebekah<br />
  2. 2.
  3. 3. Transportation<br />
  4. 4.
  5. 5.
  6. 6. Communication<br />Quilts-Different patterns <br />represented different meanings<br />Songs- Words that were put<br /> together with a tune that also had <br />a secret meaning<br />Flickering of lights<br />Different placement of household items.<br />
  7. 7. Whenever Tubman led a group of slaves to freedom, she placed herself in great danger. There was a bounty offered for her capture because she was a fugitive slave herself, and she was breaking the law in slave states by helping other slaves escape.<br /> If anyone ever wanted to change his or her mind during the journey to freedom and return, Tubman pulled out a gun and said, "You'll be free or die a slave!" Tubman knew that if anyone turned back, it would put her and the other escaping slaves in danger of discovery, capture or even death. <br />She became so well known for leading slaves to freedom that Tubman became known as the "Moses of Her People." Many slaves dreaming of freedom sang the spiritual "Go Down Moses." Slaves hoped a savior would deliver them from slavery just as Moses had delivered the Israelites from slavery. <br />Tubman made 19 trips to Maryland and helped 300 people to freedom. During these dangerous journeys she helped rescue members of her own family, including her 70-year-old parents. <br />At one point, rewards for Tubman's capture totaled $40,000. Yet, she was never captured and never failed to deliver her "passengers" to safety. As Tubman herself said, "On my Underground Railroad I [never] run my train off [the] track [and] I never [lost] a passenger."<br />Harriet Tubman<br />Shackles <br />
  8. 8. Lewiston’s History Coming to Life<br />Sally Barton- Tryon<br />Josiah Tryon<br />
  9. 9. Interview with Josiah Tryon<br />
  10. 10. Interview with Sally Barton-Tryon<br />
  11. 11. Where they lived.<br />They lived in Tryon’s Folly which is known for the 7 cellars.<br />Sally’s husband, Amos, built this house for his wife and for his shipping company. However, it was used for the runaway slaves to help them find freedom. <br />Sally Barton was scared to lose everything and harm her 11 children, but Amos and his brother Josiah had faith and felt that it was worth the risk. <br />This house is now privately owned and can only be seen from Canada or on the water. <br />
  12. 12. Where are they now?<br />(all located in the First Presbyterian Church Cemetery in Lewiston)<br /> Sally Barton’s Tomb Stone Sally’s Father Sally’s sister in law Sally’s brother <br />
  13. 13. Look very close….<br />
  14. 14. Do you want to know a secret???<br />
  15. 15. “Though some may fail,those who try on and on will succeed. Sometimes Folly leads to freedom, and the rabbit escapes from the trap”<br />
  16. 16. It’s your time to act out the voices of so many who actually traveled to the underground railroad.<br />Let us divide up characters before the scene begins!<br />http://www2.scholastic.com/browse/article.jsp?id=3751241<br />Take Five:<br />
  17. 17. How did this make you feel?<br />What would you have done differently if were Harriet Tubman?<br />What is something new that you learned after reading over this play?<br />???Questions???<br />
  18. 18. Standards<br />NY- New York State Standards<br />• Subject: Social Studies (1996)<br />• Learning Standard 1 : History of the United States and New YorkStudents will use a variety of intellectual skills to demonstrate their understanding of major ideas, eras, themes, developments, and turning points in the history of the United States and New York.<br />• Level : Elementary<br />• Key Idea : Study about the major social, political, economic, cultural, and religious developments in New York State and United States history involves learning about the important roles and contributions of individuals and groups.listen to and participate in classroom debates and discussions of important events and people in U. S. history and New York history, and examine more than one viewpoint on some events and peoplediscuss heroes, why some people are heroes, and why some individuals might be heroes to certain groups and not to othersconduct a historical case study about an important environmental concern affecting their city’s or neighborhood’s water supply, housing accommodations, or transportation system, and examine competing views on the issuesinvestigate the importance of scientific and technological inventions such as the compass, steam engine, internal combustion engine, and computer chip.<br /> Performance Indicator : Classify information by type of activity: social, political, economic, technological, scientific, cultural, or religious<br />• Learning Standard 3 : GeographyStudents will use a variety of intellectual skills to demonstrate their understanding of the geography of the interdependent world in which we live—local, national, and global—including the distribution of people, places, and environments over the Earth’s surface.<br />• Level : Elementary<br />• Key Idea : Geography can be divided into six essential elements which can be used to analyze important historic, geographic, economic, and environmental questions and issues. These six elements include: the world in spatial terms, places and regions, physical settings (including natural resources), human systems, environment and society, and the use of geography. (Adapted from The National Geography Standards, 1994: Geography for Life)s draw simple maps of their communities or regions showing the major landmarks, industries, residential areas, business districts, transportation networks, health and educational facilities, and recreation areas s examine different kinds of maps to identify and define their components, including key, title, legend, cardinal and intermediate directions, scale, and grid s use cardboard, wood, clay, or other materials to make a model of their community or region showing their physical characteristics (Taken from National Geography Standards, 1994)s read about children living in other cultures to learn about their customs, beliefs, and traditions; natural resource use; food; shelter; socialization and schooling; and other important components of culture s draw maps and pictures showing how people make use of and modify their physical environments (e.g., land use for agriculture, mining, residential developments, transportation networks, recreation).<br /> Performance Indicator : Study about how people live, work, and utilize natural resources<br /> Performance Indicator : Investigate how people depend on and modify the physical environment.<br />
  19. 19. References<br />Interviews with Tim Henderson and Eva Nickels from the Art Council in Lewiston<br />Freedom Crossing by Margaret Goff Clark<br />http://www2.scholastic.com/browse/article.jsp?id=3751241<br />http://www.nationalgeographic.com/railroad/<br />http://www.castellaniartmuseum.org/ (visiting the CAT)<br />http://historiclewiston.org/freedomcrossing.html<br />http://www.historiclewiston.org/pictures.html<br />http://www1.phillyburbs.com/undergroundrailroad/signals.shtml<br />http://www.osblackhistory.com/quilts.php<br />
  20. 20. Lewiston Art Council<br />Interview: Josiah Tryon- Tim Henderson<br />Interview: Sally Barton- Eva Nickels<br />Pictures/ Video from Castellani Art Museum at NU<br />Photography by Lauren Falsetti<br />Credits:<br />
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