Chapter 9 Mac OS X on the Desktop McGraw-Hill
Learning Outcomes <ul><li>Describe Mac OS X features </li></ul><ul><li>Install Mac OS X </li></ul><ul><li>Manage Mac OS X ...
Make a Mac OS X desktop suit your tastes and needs
Mac OS X Overview <ul><li>A Brief History </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Apple founded April 1, 1976 by Steven Wozniak and Steven J...
Mac OS X Overview <ul><li>A Brief History  (cont.) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>1983: Apple introduced the first GUI computer  fo...
Apple  MacBook and iMac
Table 9-1  Release  Dates of Major OS X Versions
Mac OS X Overview <ul><li>Mac OS X Features </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Built-in Multimedia Hardware and Software  in the Mac OS...
Mac OS X Overview <ul><li>Mac OS X Features </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Mac OS X Snow Leopard Enhancements </li></ul></ul><ul><u...
Mac OS X Overview <ul><li>Mac OS X Features  (cont.) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Mac OS X Snow Leopard Desktop </li></ul></ul><u...
Figure 9-1  Key features of the default Mac OS X Snow Leopard desktop
The Dock on the right side of the screen
Mac OS X Overview <ul><li>Mac OS X Features  (cont.) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Mac OS X Snow Leopard Desktop  (cont.) </li></u...
Figure 9-2  A cluttered desktop
Figure 9-3  Exposé in action
Installing Mac OS X <ul><li>Mac OS X Setup Assistant </li></ul><ul><ul><li>On new Mac Setup Assistant leads user  through ...
Mac OS version information from the Apple menu
Figure 9-4  The More info button provides an extensive list of installed hardware and software
Figure 9-5  The menu from the Mac OS X installation DVD
Figure 9-6  From here the Mac OS X Setup Assistant will guide you through the upgrade
Table 9-2  Minimum Hardware Requirements for OS X
Step-by-Step 9.01 Installing Mac OS X Installing Mac OS X
Installing Mac OS X <ul><li>Post-Installation Tasks </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Software Update </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>U...
Figure 9-7  If you have an Internet connection, this message will appear soon after you complete a new installation
Figure 9-8  Open Software Update from the Apple Menu
Managing Mac OS X on the Desktop <ul><li>Finder </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Finder menu: Finder, File, Edit, View, Go,  Window, ...
Finder window with Applications folder open
Managing Mac OS X on the Desktop <ul><li>Apple Menu </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Click Apple icon on left of menu bar </li></ul><...
Figure 9-9  The OS X Apple menu
Managing Mac OS X on the Desktop <ul><li>Changing System Preferences </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Open from Apple menu or Dock </...
Figure 9-10  The content of System Preferences varies by system configuration
Managing Mac OS X on the Desktop <ul><li>Changing System Preferences </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Personal Preference </li></ul><...
Appearance preferences
The Desktop Preferences
The Dock preferences
Use the Exposé pane to assign keys or mouse buttons to actions that will quickly reveal all open windows
Figure 9-11  Select a space
Figure 9-12  Yet another way to move among the spaces
Figure 9-13  General pane on Security preferences
Figure 9-14  An example of Spotlight’s live search results after entering only “ch”
Managing Mac OS X on the Desktop <ul><li>Changing System Preferences </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Hardware </li></ul></ul><ul><ul...
The Energy Saver pane requires credentials to make changes
Mouse preferences for the wireless Magic Mouse
Managing Mac OS X on the Desktop <ul><li>Changing System Preferences </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Internet & Wireless </li></ul><...
The Network preferences pane
Figure 9-15  The Bluetooth preferences pane shows discovered Bluetooth devices
Managing Mac OS X on the Desktop <ul><li>Changing System Preferences  (cont.) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>System </li></ul></ul>...
Software Update pane
The Universal Access preferences pane
Managing Mac OS X on the Desktop <ul><li>Changing System Preferences  (cont.) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Other </li></ul></ul><...
Managing Mac OS X on the Desktop <ul><li>Adding Objects to the Dock </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Drag object on to add (file, fol...
Managing Mac OS X on the Desktop <ul><li>Terminal Windows in Mac OS X </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Finder | Applications | Utilit...
Figure 9-16  A Terminal window showing the result of running two commands
Managing Mac OS X on the Desktop <ul><li>Managing Files in Mac OS X </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Finder Views </li></ul></ul><ul>...
Figure 9-17  A Finder window in Cover Flow view
Managing Mac OS X on the Desktop <ul><li>Managing Files in Mac OS X  (cont.) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Copying, Pasting, and D...
Copying a file
Managing Mac OS X on the Desktop <ul><li>Managing Files in Mac OS X  (cont.) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Moving and Renaming Fil...
Step-by-Step 9.02 Creating a New Folder  to Organize Files Managing Mac OS X on the Desktop
Managing Mac OS X on the Desktop <ul><li>Printing in Mac OS X </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Almost every OS X app uses Print menu ...
Managing Mac OS X on the Desktop <ul><li>Printing in Mac OS X  (cont.) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Installing a Printer </li></u...
Figure 9-18  The Add Printer pop-up menu in the Print dialog box
The Page Setup dialog box
Managing Mac OS X on the Desktop <ul><li>Printing in Mac OS X  (cont.) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Setting Printing Options </li...
Managing Mac OS X on the Desktop <ul><li>Printing in Mac OS X  (cont.) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Where to Find the Print Queue...
Managing Local Security in Mac OS X <ul><li>Mac OS X has many security features, but you need to know steps to maintain th...
Figure 9-19  Advice from Apple
Managing Local Security in Mac OS X <ul><li>Securing an Internet Connection </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Firewall </li></ul></ul>...
Figure 9-20  Firewall turned on
Figure 9-21  This setting is necessary if you are using any sharing services on your Mac.
Managing Local Security in Mac OS X <ul><li>Antivirus and Antispyware </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Install antivirus and antispyw...
Managing Local Security in Mac OS X <ul><li>FileVault </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Encrypts the user’s Home folder </li></ul></ul...
Figure 9-22  The Security preferences pane with FileVault settings
Managing Local Security in Mac OS X <ul><li>Master Password </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Unlocks any account on the computer </li...
Managing Local Security in Mac OS X <ul><li>Secure Virtual Memory </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Encrypts swap file </li></ul></ul>...
Managing Local Security in Mac OS X <ul><li>Securing System Preferences Panes </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Certain panes are secu...
 
Managing Local Security in Mac OS X <ul><li>Keychain </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Part of a credentials management system </li></...
Managing Local Security in Mac OS X <ul><li>Keychain  (cont.) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Two default keychains belong to the OS...
Managing Local Security in Mac OS X <ul><li>Keychain  (cont.) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Create additional keychains for varyin...
Managing Local Security in Mac OS X <ul><li>Managing Local User Accounts </li></ul><ul><ul><li>OS X supports multiple loca...
Figure 9-23  A multiuser login prompt
Managing Local Security in Mac OS X <ul><li>Managing Local User Accounts  (cont.) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Types of Users and...
Figure 9-24  The Accounts preferences pane
Managing Local Security in Mac OS X <ul><li>Managing Local User Accounts  (cont.) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Types of Users and...
Managing Local Security in Mac OS X <ul><li>Managing Local User Accounts  (cont.) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Types of Users and...
Managing Local Security in Mac OS X <ul><li>Managing Local User Accounts  (cont.) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Types of Users and...
Managing Local Security in Mac OS X <ul><li>Managing Local User Accounts  (cont.) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Types of Users and...
Step-by-Step 9.03 Adding a New User Managing Local Security in Mac OS X
Troubleshooting Common Mac OS Problems <ul><li>Where to Find Help </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Help with the OS </li></ul></ul><u...
OS X Mac Help window with the Spotlight Search box on the top right
Troubleshooting Common Mac OS Problems <ul><li>Where to Find Help </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Help menu within Applications </li...
Figure 9-25  The Microsoft Word for Windows Help utility
Troubleshooting Common Mac OS Problems <ul><li>When to Quit </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Problem with open application freezing <...
An application’s Quit option
Select the application from the Force Quit Applications box
Select the application from the Force Quit Applications box
Troubleshooting Common Mac OS Problems <ul><li>Failure to Quit </li></ul><ul><ul><li>OS X won’t shutdown because an  appli...
Troubleshooting Common Mac OS Problems <ul><li>Forgotten Password </li></ul><ul><ul><li>If you forget the password, use th...
Troubleshooting Common Mac OS Problems <ul><li>Disappearing Sidebar Item </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Open Finder Preferences </l...
Control what appears in the Sidebar
Troubleshooting Common Mac OS Problems <ul><li>Useful System Utilities </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Disk Utility </li></ul></ul><...
Disk Utility window
Network preferences pane
Chapter 9 Summary <ul><li>Mac OS X Overview </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Apple Computer, now officially Apple Inc.,  began April ...
Chapter 9 Summary <ul><li>Mac OS X Overview  (cont.) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Apple’s UNIX core, known as Darwin, is a  produ...
Chapter 9 Summary <ul><li>Installing and configuring Mac OS X </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Mac OS X installations are on propriet...
Chapter 9 Summary <ul><li>Installing and configuring Mac OS X  (cont.) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Hardware requirements have no...
Chapter 9 Summary <ul><li>Managing Mac OS X on the Desktop </li></ul><ul><ul><li>In OS X, what were called Control Panels ...
Chapter 9 Summary <ul><li>Managing Mac OS X on the Desktop  (cont.) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>System Preferences is the Mac OS...
Chapter 9 Summary <ul><li>Managing Mac OS X on the Desktop  (cont.) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Most printers install automatica...
Chapter 9 Summary <ul><li>Managing Local Security in Mac OS X </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Ensure that you enable the OS X Firewa...
Chapter 9 Summary <ul><li>Managing Local Security in Mac OS X  (cont.) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Turn on Secure Virtual Memory...
Chapter 9 Summary <ul><li>Managing Local Security in Mac OS X  (cont.) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Mac OS X supports multiple lo...
Chapter 9 Summary <ul><li>Managing Local Security in Mac OS X  (cont.) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The administrator account typ...
Chapter 9 Summary <ul><li>Troubleshooting Common Mac OS Problems </li></ul><ul><ul><li>When you need help with Mac OS X, f...
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Survey of Operating Systems Ch 09

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  • This is a good place to remind students of the tight integration of Apple’s hardware and OS development, which means that major changes in one tend to drive changes in the other. However, in this text students should focus their attention on the OS itself with consideration of the hardware secondary. Ask if students understand the difference between a system that offered color graphics, and a system that supported a GUI. A few “old timers” may recall the Apple II, but more may recall models of the IBM PC in the 1980s that supported color graphics. The OS was still DOS with its command-line interface, but you could produce color, even at the command line, but mostly within applications that created bitmaps of color. This is just not the same as a GUI in which there are discrete graphical objects. You also can have a GUI without color, which was true of the early Apple Macs.
  • Ask students to consider what advantages are inherent in having the same manufacturer produce both the computer system and the OS. Can the students find examples from previous chapters where this close relationship would have been beneficial? If necessary, ask them to consider issues like device drivers and hardware compatibility lists.
  • Oops! The missing version is Mac OS X 10.1, Puma, was released in September or 2001
  • Macs are loaded with hardware features and the software is either free or very inexpensive. There are plenty of titles from other software publishers, and many of those are inexpensive. Compare the price of Microsoft Office for the Mac versus the editions for PCs.
  • Ask the students to note that the fact that Apple makes both the computers and the OS does not eliminate the need to consider hardware requirements for the OS, but it does eliminate hardware compatibility . Ask them to consider and discuss why this is so.
  • Oops! The missing version. Mac OS X 10.1 Puma, was released in September or 2001.
  • Step-by-Step 9.01 Installing Mac OS X. In this exercise students will either upgrade an Apple computer to a newer version of Mac OS X or they will do a clean installation into a virtual machine. Make sure that you have tested the exercise on a lab computer, making any preparations necessary. For instance, if the students will install into a VM, ensure that they have all they need to do this. If they have not already done this, you could have them follow the instructions in Chapter 3 for downloading and installing VirtualBox on their Macs and creating a virtual machine for the Mac OS X installation.
  • Before beginning this section, remind students to be on the lookout for elements of the Mac OS that are similar to elements of OSs they’ve encountered previously. Ask them to consider why the OSs share these similarities.
  • The Other preferences category it does not always appear.
  • Step-by-Step 9.02 Creating a New Folder to Organize Files. In this exercise students will practice some of the file management tasks they learned in this section.
  • Have the students do the Try This on page 347 to see Apple’s most current recommendation. Then the Try This on page 348 has them search for new information on viruses that target Macs.
  • Point out that the statement about Windows in the first sentence under the Antivirus and Antispyware title is incorrect. Windows User Account Control (UAC), a Windows feature since Windows Vista, guards against software installing without consent.
  • Because this is a survey course, we omit many features and details, such as Secure Empty Trash. Consider explaining the Secure Empty Trash command, available from the Finder menu. Begin by asking students if they believe deleted data is recoverable. In spite of what they believe, deleted data is recoverable if it is deleted in the normal fashion on a Mac or Windows computer. That is because the file system simply marks the space the deleted file occupies as “available” but does not truly overwrite the data until it is needed to store another file. Even then, someone using sophisticated means can often recover overwritten files. Then Apple added Secure Empty Trash command for when you really need to securely delete items in the Trash. This option uses an algorithm that overwrites the deleted data so that it cannot be recovered. Caution them that if they select Secure Empty Trash it may take several minutes if there are many items and/or they take up a great deal of disk space. Also warn them that they will not be able to retrieve any of the data.
  • Demonstrate creating a new keychain. Open the Keychain Access folder. Show the users the three default keychains: login, System, and System Roots. Then click the plus (+) button at the bottom of the folder and fill in the pop-up box to create a new keychain.
  • Step-by-Step 9.03 Adding a New User. In this exercise students will add a standard user account into Mac OS X. This will be a standard account.
  • Consider demonstrating resetting a password with the OS X installation DVD. It is just a tad more difficult than described, although still a security hole for an individual Mac. First, you need to shut down the computer and restart it while holding the C key. Then, select a language. When the Mac OS X Installer opens, select Utilities from the menu (at top of screen). Select Reset Password from the Utilities menu. In the Reset Password dialog select the volume containing the user account. Select the user account (if more than one), Enter a new password (twice) and a hint. Click Save. Quit Mac OS X Installer Select Restart in the “Are you sure…” drop down box. After it restarts log in with the new password Remove DVD and put it in a safe place.
  • Survey of Operating Systems Ch 09

    1. 1. Chapter 9 Mac OS X on the Desktop McGraw-Hill
    2. 2. Learning Outcomes <ul><li>Describe Mac OS X features </li></ul><ul><li>Install Mac OS X </li></ul><ul><li>Manage Mac OS X on the desktop </li></ul><ul><li>Manage local security in Mac OS X </li></ul><ul><li>Troubleshoot common Mac OS X problems </li></ul>
    3. 3. Make a Mac OS X desktop suit your tastes and needs
    4. 4. Mac OS X Overview <ul><li>A Brief History </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Apple founded April 1, 1976 by Steven Wozniak and Steven Jobs in Los Altos, California </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>First product: Apple I </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>1977: Apple II </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>The first personal computer to come in a plastic case </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Supported color graphics, but no GUI </li></ul></ul></ul>
    5. 5. Mac OS X Overview <ul><li>A Brief History (cont.) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>1983: Apple introduced the first GUI computer for the consumer market, the Lisa. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>1984: Apple launched the Macintosh 128k </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>First affordable GUI-based personal computer </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Introduced Mac OS </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>1999: Mac OS X Server 1.0 Based on open- source UNIX, Darwin </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>2000: announced Mac OS X 10.0 desktop OS, available at retail in 2001 </li></ul></ul>
    6. 6. Apple MacBook and iMac
    7. 7. Table 9-1 Release Dates of Major OS X Versions
    8. 8. Mac OS X Overview <ul><li>Mac OS X Features </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Built-in Multimedia Hardware and Software in the Mac OS </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Hardware and OS from Apple </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Standard hardware and software for a wide variety of tasks </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ease of Use of the Mac OS </li></ul></ul>
    9. 9. Mac OS X Overview <ul><li>Mac OS X Features </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Mac OS X Snow Leopard Enhancements </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Boot Camp improved </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Finder rewritten to work with new features </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Safari 4 Internet browser introduced with Snow Leopard (upgraded to version 5 since) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Improved support for Time Machine (backup service) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Enhanced user interface features </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>OS code faster and more stable </li></ul></ul></ul>
    10. 10. Mac OS X Overview <ul><li>Mac OS X Features (cont.) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Mac OS X Snow Leopard Desktop </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Finder for file management </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Dock for quickly loading apps and switching between open apps </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Resembles floating bar or shelf </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Position at bottom or sides </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Drag and drop programs on and off </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>
    11. 11. Figure 9-1 Key features of the default Mac OS X Snow Leopard desktop
    12. 12. The Dock on the right side of the screen
    13. 13. Mac OS X Overview <ul><li>Mac OS X Features (cont.) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Mac OS X Snow Leopard Desktop (cont.) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Exposé </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Select an open app from an array of miniature windows </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>F3 to use Exposé </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Click to select window </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Use mouse or arrow keys to navigate among Exposé windows </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Snow Leopard Exposé has proportional windows </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>
    14. 14. Figure 9-2 A cluttered desktop
    15. 15. Figure 9-3 Exposé in action
    16. 16. Installing Mac OS X <ul><li>Mac OS X Setup Assistant </li></ul><ul><ul><li>On new Mac Setup Assistant leads user through configuring user preferences </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Preparing to Install Mac OS X </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Check the Version before Upgrading </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Hardware Requirements </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Intel Macs only </li></ul></ul></ul>
    17. 17. Mac OS version information from the Apple menu
    18. 18. Figure 9-4 The More info button provides an extensive list of installed hardware and software
    19. 19. Figure 9-5 The menu from the Mac OS X installation DVD
    20. 20. Figure 9-6 From here the Mac OS X Setup Assistant will guide you through the upgrade
    21. 21. Table 9-2 Minimum Hardware Requirements for OS X
    22. 22. Step-by-Step 9.01 Installing Mac OS X Installing Mac OS X
    23. 23. Installing Mac OS X <ul><li>Post-Installation Tasks </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Software Update </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Updates Mac OS X and other installed software </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Click Show Details button for list of all updates </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Install and Restart </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Install Security Software </li></ul></ul>
    24. 24. Figure 9-7 If you have an Internet connection, this message will appear soon after you complete a new installation
    25. 25. Figure 9-8 Open Software Update from the Apple Menu
    26. 26. Managing Mac OS X on the Desktop <ul><li>Finder </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Finder menu: Finder, File, Edit, View, Go, Window, Help </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Customizing desktop, installing and removing applications, adding printers </li></ul></ul>
    27. 27. Finder window with Applications folder open
    28. 28. Managing Mac OS X on the Desktop <ul><li>Apple Menu </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Click Apple icon on left of menu bar </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Drop-down menu </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>About This Mac  Force Quit </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Software Update  Sleep </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Mac OS X Software/App Store  Restart </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>System Preferences  Shut Down </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Dock  Log out User </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Recent Items </li></ul></ul></ul>
    29. 29. Figure 9-9 The OS X Apple menu
    30. 30. Managing Mac OS X on the Desktop <ul><li>Changing System Preferences </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Open from Apple menu or Dock </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Personal </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Hardware </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Internet & Wireless </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>System </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Other </li></ul></ul></ul>
    31. 31. Figure 9-10 The content of System Preferences varies by system configuration
    32. 32. Managing Mac OS X on the Desktop <ul><li>Changing System Preferences </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Personal Preference </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Appearance </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Desktop & Screen Saver </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Dock </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Exposé & Spaces </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Language & Text </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Security </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Spotlight </li></ul></ul></ul>
    33. 33. Appearance preferences
    34. 34. The Desktop Preferences
    35. 35. The Dock preferences
    36. 36. Use the Exposé pane to assign keys or mouse buttons to actions that will quickly reveal all open windows
    37. 37. Figure 9-11 Select a space
    38. 38. Figure 9-12 Yet another way to move among the spaces
    39. 39. Figure 9-13 General pane on Security preferences
    40. 40. Figure 9-14 An example of Spotlight’s live search results after entering only “ch”
    41. 41. Managing Mac OS X on the Desktop <ul><li>Changing System Preferences </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Hardware </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>CDs & DVDs </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Displays </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Energy Saver </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Keyboard </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Mouse </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Trackpad </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Print & Fax </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Sound </li></ul></ul></ul>
    42. 42. The Energy Saver pane requires credentials to make changes
    43. 43. Mouse preferences for the wireless Magic Mouse
    44. 44. Managing Mac OS X on the Desktop <ul><li>Changing System Preferences </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Internet & Wireless </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>MobileMe </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Network </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Bluetooth </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Sharing </li></ul></ul></ul>
    45. 45. The Network preferences pane
    46. 46. Figure 9-15 The Bluetooth preferences pane shows discovered Bluetooth devices
    47. 47. Managing Mac OS X on the Desktop <ul><li>Changing System Preferences (cont.) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>System </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Users/Accounts </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Date & Time </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Parental Controls </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Software Update </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Speech </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Startup Disk </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Time Machine </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Universal Access </li></ul></ul></ul>
    48. 48. Software Update pane
    49. 49. The Universal Access preferences pane
    50. 50. Managing Mac OS X on the Desktop <ul><li>Changing System Preferences (cont.) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Other </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Appears when new devices are added that are not configured by other preferences panes </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Example: adding a Wacom Tablet resulted in an icon for this new device in the Other row </li></ul></ul></ul>
    51. 51. Managing Mac OS X on the Desktop <ul><li>Adding Objects to the Dock </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Drag object on to add (file, folder, app, Internet bookmark, etc.) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Drag off to remove </li></ul></ul>
    52. 52. Managing Mac OS X on the Desktop <ul><li>Terminal Windows in Mac OS X </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Finder | Applications | Utilities | TerminalBASH shell like </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>BASH shell </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Run UNIX/Linux commands </li></ul></ul>
    53. 53. Figure 9-16 A Terminal window showing the result of running two commands
    54. 54. Managing Mac OS X on the Desktop <ul><li>Managing Files in Mac OS X </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Finder Views </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Icon: click icon once to select, twice to open </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>List: displays indented outline format </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Column: Contents of selected object shown in column to right </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Cover Flow: A pane across the top of folder shows small images of each object </li></ul></ul></ul>
    55. 55. Figure 9-17 A Finder window in Cover Flow view
    56. 56. Managing Mac OS X on the Desktop <ul><li>Managing Files in Mac OS X (cont.) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Copying, Pasting, and Deleting Files and Folders </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Use Edit menu items or </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Use shortcut keys </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Copy: COMMAND-C </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Cut: COMMAND-X </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Paste (first copy or cut): COMMAND-V </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Delete: COMMAND- DELETE </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>
    57. 57. Copying a file
    58. 58. Managing Mac OS X on the Desktop <ul><li>Managing Files in Mac OS X (cont.) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Moving and Renaming Files and Folders in Finder </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Move: drag and drop </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Two methods to rename a file or folder </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Click item, pause, click again, type name </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Right-click file or folder, choose File | Get Info (or press COMMAND-I), select Name and Extension and replace with new name and/or extension </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>
    59. 59. Step-by-Step 9.02 Creating a New Folder to Organize Files Managing Mac OS X on the Desktop
    60. 60. Managing Mac OS X on the Desktop <ul><li>Printing in Mac OS X </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Almost every OS X app uses Print menu </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Create a PDF document from Print menu </li></ul></ul>
    61. 61. Managing Mac OS X on the Desktop <ul><li>Printing in Mac OS X (cont.) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Installing a Printer </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Connect printer, power up </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>OS X searches for driver </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Verify with Print command from any application </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>If not installed, select Add Printer </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Print Center icon displays on Dock during printing </li></ul></ul></ul>
    62. 62. Figure 9-18 The Add Printer pop-up menu in the Print dialog box
    63. 63. The Page Setup dialog box
    64. 64. Managing Mac OS X on the Desktop <ul><li>Printing in Mac OS X (cont.) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Setting Printing Options </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Print dialog box </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Select printer </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Options specific to the printer model </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Page setup button to access page settings </li></ul></ul></ul>
    65. 65. Managing Mac OS X on the Desktop <ul><li>Printing in Mac OS X (cont.) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Where to Find the Print Queue </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Open Print Center icon during printing, or </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Open printer icon from Print and Fax pane and click Open Print Queue button </li></ul></ul></ul>
    66. 66. Managing Local Security in Mac OS X <ul><li>Mac OS X has many security features, but you need to know steps to maintain this security </li></ul>
    67. 67. Figure 9-19 Advice from Apple
    68. 68. Managing Local Security in Mac OS X <ul><li>Securing an Internet Connection </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Firewall </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>On by default in recent versions of OS X </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Manage through System Preferences Security pane </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Turn on and click Advanced to configure settings </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Block all incoming connections if you are not sharing files, printers, or screens and not using iChat Bonjour or iTunes music sharing </li></ul></ul></ul>
    69. 69. Figure 9-20 Firewall turned on
    70. 70. Figure 9-21 This setting is necessary if you are using any sharing services on your Mac.
    71. 71. Managing Local Security in Mac OS X <ul><li>Antivirus and Antispyware </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Install antivirus and antispyware software </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Commercial and free versions available for Mac OS X </li></ul></ul>
    72. 72. Managing Local Security in Mac OS X <ul><li>FileVault </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Encrypts the user’s Home folder </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Turn on, and files are accessible only while user is logged on </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Administrator can turn on for a user, or user can turn on using the Security preferences pane </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>An administrator must set a Master Password </li></ul></ul>
    73. 73. Figure 9-22 The Security preferences pane with FileVault settings
    74. 74. Managing Local Security in Mac OS X <ul><li>Master Password </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Unlocks any account on the computer </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Unlocks any FileVault-compressed Home folder on the computer </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Used when user forgets their own password </li></ul></ul>
    75. 75. Managing Local Security in Mac OS X <ul><li>Secure Virtual Memory </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Encrypts swap file </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Use if you work with data that must be protected </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Downside: a slight delay when switching programs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Enable on the General page of the Security preferences pane </li></ul></ul>
    76. 76. Managing Local Security in Mac OS X <ul><li>Securing System Preferences Panes </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Certain panes are secured </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Lock on lower left of pane </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>By default, unlocking/locking one pane affects all </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Set a preference to require a password to unlock each System Preferences pane on the General tab of Security preferences pane </li></ul></ul>
    77. 78. Managing Local Security in Mac OS X <ul><li>Keychain </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Part of a credentials management system </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Password to the keychain gives the user access to all the passwords on that keychain </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Each keychain is a secure database of a user’s passwords </li></ul></ul>
    78. 79. Managing Local Security in Mac OS X <ul><li>Keychain (cont.) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Two default keychains belong to the OS </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>System </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>System Roots </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Login keychain created for each user at first login </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>User’s account password is master password for this keychain </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Credentials you supply for various functions (e-mail, Web sites, etc.) are added to the keychain </li></ul></ul></ul>
    79. 80. Managing Local Security in Mac OS X <ul><li>Keychain (cont.) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Create additional keychains for varying security levels </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Create a key chain for online banking that includes logging out if idle time exceeds a threshold </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Create a keychain without restrictions for low-security activity, such as entertainment </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Finder | Applications | Utilities | Keychain Access </li></ul></ul>
    80. 81. Managing Local Security in Mac OS X <ul><li>Managing Local User Accounts </li></ul><ul><ul><li>OS X supports multiple local user accounts </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Each account restricted to the home folder and preferences are preserved </li></ul></ul>
    81. 82. Figure 9-23 A multiuser login prompt
    82. 83. Managing Local Security in Mac OS X <ul><li>Managing Local User Accounts (cont.) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Types of Users and Privileges </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Administrator Account (admin) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>For advanced users and person who will administer computer </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Required to change system preference settings and install software in the main application and library folders </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Required to create, modify, and delete user accounts </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>First account created is this type </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>
    83. 84. Figure 9-24 The Accounts preferences pane
    84. 85. Managing Local Security in Mac OS X <ul><li>Managing Local User Accounts (cont.) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Types of Users and Privileges (cont.) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Standard Account </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>For ordinary users </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>File access is limited to only the user’s Home folder and the shared folder (/users/shared/) </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Access to higher-level system preferences denied </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>
    85. 86. Managing Local Security in Mac OS X <ul><li>Managing Local User Accounts (cont.) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Types of Users and Privileges (cont.) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Root Account </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Exists, but is disabled by default </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Has complete control over all folders and files </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Is seldom needed </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>If needed, use Terminal windows and the sudo command to temporarily borrow root privileges </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>
    86. 87. Managing Local Security in Mac OS X <ul><li>Managing Local User Accounts (cont.) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Types of Users and Privileges (cont.) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Root Account (cont.) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>If you enable root account </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Give it a strong password </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Only log on as root for very advanced tasks </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul>
    87. 88. Managing Local Security in Mac OS X <ul><li>Managing Local User Accounts (cont.) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Types of Users and Privileges (cont.) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Automatic Login </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Logs you in without requiring password </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Creating User Accounts </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Account created during installation is an administrator </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>After installation you can created additional user accounts </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>
    88. 89. Step-by-Step 9.03 Adding a New User Managing Local Security in Mac OS X
    89. 90. Troubleshooting Common Mac OS Problems <ul><li>Where to Find Help </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Help with the OS </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Access Mac Help from the Finder’s Help menu </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Visit Apple’s support center at www.info.apple.com/support </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>AppleCare service and support ($$) www.apple.com/support/products/ </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>User groups: www.apple.com/usergroups/ </li></ul></ul></ul>
    90. 91. OS X Mac Help window with the Spotlight Search box on the top right
    91. 92. Troubleshooting Common Mac OS Problems <ul><li>Where to Find Help </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Help menu within Applications </li></ul></ul>
    92. 93. Figure 9-25 The Microsoft Word for Windows Help utility
    93. 94. Troubleshooting Common Mac OS Problems <ul><li>When to Quit </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Problem with open application freezing </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Click the application’s name in the menu bar and select Quit Application </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>If application remains open select Force Quit from the Apple menu </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Opens the Force Quit Applications box </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Select the application and click Force Quit </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Then relaunch application </li></ul></ul>
    94. 95. An application’s Quit option
    95. 96. Select the application from the Force Quit Applications box
    96. 97. Select the application from the Force Quit Applications box
    97. 98. Troubleshooting Common Mac OS Problems <ul><li>Failure to Quit </li></ul><ul><ul><li>OS X won’t shutdown because an application failed to quit </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Use Force Quit </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>If Force Quit does not work, press and hold power button for several seconds until the computer shuts down </li></ul></ul>
    98. 99. Troubleshooting Common Mac OS Problems <ul><li>Forgotten Password </li></ul><ul><ul><li>If you forget the password, use the OS X disc </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Insert disc and restart, pressing the C key </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>From Install screen choose Utilities | Reset Password </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Select location of System folder </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Select the name of your account </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Enter new password twice </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Keep disc in a safe place, as this is a security problem </li></ul></ul></ul>
    99. 100. Troubleshooting Common Mac OS Problems <ul><li>Disappearing Sidebar Item </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Open Finder Preferences </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Place a check mark next to item </li></ul></ul>
    100. 101. Control what appears in the Sidebar
    101. 102. Troubleshooting Common Mac OS Problems <ul><li>Useful System Utilities </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Disk Utility </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Finder | Applications | Utilities | Disk Utility </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Summary and usage statistics for all volumes </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Disk First Aid </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Network Preferences </li></ul></ul>
    102. 103. Disk Utility window
    103. 104. Network preferences pane
    104. 105. Chapter 9 Summary <ul><li>Mac OS X Overview </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Apple Computer, now officially Apple Inc., began April 1, 1976,with the Apple I. The company introduced the Apple II one year later. In 1983 the Lisa was introduced, the first production computer with a GUI. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Apple introduced the Macintosh in 1984, the first affordable personal computer with a color GUI. </li></ul></ul>
    105. 106. Chapter 9 Summary <ul><li>Mac OS X Overview (cont.) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Apple’s UNIX core, known as Darwin, is a product of the open source development community, with all the advantages that brings. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Apple has introduced seven (book says “six” in the review, but seven in the text) major versions, announced an eighth, and had many interim minor versions of OS X. The most recently announced major version is Lion, projected to ship in the second quarter of 2011. </li></ul></ul>
    106. 107. Chapter 9 Summary <ul><li>Installing and configuring Mac OS X </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Mac OS X installations are on proprietary Mac hardware, which normally comes with the OS preinstalled. Therefore, as a user, most people complete the installation with the help of the Mac OS X Setup Assistant. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Before upgrading, check the version of the installed Mac OS. </li></ul></ul>
    107. 108. Chapter 9 Summary <ul><li>Installing and configuring Mac OS X (cont.) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Hardware requirements have not increased between Mac OS X Leopard (10.5) and Mac OS X Snow Leopard (10.6). </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The most important post-installation task is bringing the Mac OS X installation up-to-date with the latest security and functionality updates. This will occur automatically, or you can initiate it through the GUI. </li></ul></ul>
    108. 109. Chapter 9 Summary <ul><li>Managing Mac OS X on the Desktop </li></ul><ul><ul><li>In OS X, what were called Control Panels in OS 9 are now described as System Preferences. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The Finder in OS X is the GUI face of OS X to the user. It offers a variety of file management tools. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The Apple menu opens when you click the Apple icon in the upper left of the OS X window. Use this menu to shut down, restart, or log out, and a few other tasks. </li></ul></ul>
    109. 110. Chapter 9 Summary <ul><li>Managing Mac OS X on the Desktop (cont.) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>System Preferences is the Mac OS X equivalent of the Windows Control Panel. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Drag icons on and off the Dock and configure it to be on the left side, right side, or bottom of the screen. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Open Applications | Utilities and select Terminal to open a window with the $ prompt where you can enter UNIX commands. </li></ul></ul>
    110. 111. Chapter 9 Summary <ul><li>Managing Mac OS X on the Desktop (cont.) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Most printers install automatically, appearing in any applications Print menu. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>If a printer does not automatically install, use the Print box and click Add Printer and it will attempt to detect the printer. </li></ul></ul>
    111. 112. Chapter 9 Summary <ul><li>Managing Local Security in Mac OS X </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Ensure that you enable the OS X Firewall. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>While Mac OS X includes many security features, even Apple recommends that you install antivirus software. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>If you have important and sensitive information on your Mac, ensure that you securely encrypt your Home folder with FileVault. Additionally, use a strong password, and never leave your computer unattended without logging out. </li></ul></ul>
    112. 113. Chapter 9 Summary <ul><li>Managing Local Security in Mac OS X (cont.) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Turn on Secure Virtual Memory for added security. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The keychain is a secure database of a user’s passwords. By default, Mac OS X creates a keychain for you the first time you log in, using your account password as a master password for the keychain. </li></ul></ul>
    113. 114. Chapter 9 Summary <ul><li>Managing Local Security in Mac OS X (cont.) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Mac OS X supports multiple local user accounts. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The first user account in the Mac OS X is automatically designated an administrator. If you forget the user name or password for this account, you can use the OS X installation CD to reset the password. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The types of user accounts in OS X are administrator, standard account, and root. </li></ul></ul>
    114. 115. Chapter 9 Summary <ul><li>Managing Local Security in Mac OS X (cont.) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The administrator account type can create new accounts, change all system preference settings, and install software in the main application and library folders. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The standard user account type can only access files in the user’s home folder and the shared folder (/Users/Shared/). </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The root account has complete control over all folders and files on the Mac. This account is disabled by default. </li></ul></ul>
    115. 116. Chapter 9 Summary <ul><li>Troubleshooting Common Mac OS Problems </li></ul><ul><ul><li>When you need help with Mac OS X, first search through Mac Help or the Help utility for an application if you have narrowed the problem to one application. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>If an application freezes, press Command-Option-Esc to force it to quit. OS X handles this extreme measure very well. </li></ul></ul>

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