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Survey of Operating Systems Ch 07
Survey of Operating Systems Ch 07
Survey of Operating Systems Ch 07
Survey of Operating Systems Ch 07
Survey of Operating Systems Ch 07
Survey of Operating Systems Ch 07
Survey of Operating Systems Ch 07
Survey of Operating Systems Ch 07
Survey of Operating Systems Ch 07
Survey of Operating Systems Ch 07
Survey of Operating Systems Ch 07
Survey of Operating Systems Ch 07
Survey of Operating Systems Ch 07
Survey of Operating Systems Ch 07
Survey of Operating Systems Ch 07
Survey of Operating Systems Ch 07
Survey of Operating Systems Ch 07
Survey of Operating Systems Ch 07
Survey of Operating Systems Ch 07
Survey of Operating Systems Ch 07
Survey of Operating Systems Ch 07
Survey of Operating Systems Ch 07
Survey of Operating Systems Ch 07
Survey of Operating Systems Ch 07
Survey of Operating Systems Ch 07
Survey of Operating Systems Ch 07
Survey of Operating Systems Ch 07
Survey of Operating Systems Ch 07
Survey of Operating Systems Ch 07
Survey of Operating Systems Ch 07
Survey of Operating Systems Ch 07
Survey of Operating Systems Ch 07
Survey of Operating Systems Ch 07
Survey of Operating Systems Ch 07
Survey of Operating Systems Ch 07
Survey of Operating Systems Ch 07
Survey of Operating Systems Ch 07
Survey of Operating Systems Ch 07
Survey of Operating Systems Ch 07
Survey of Operating Systems Ch 07
Survey of Operating Systems Ch 07
Survey of Operating Systems Ch 07
Survey of Operating Systems Ch 07
Survey of Operating Systems Ch 07
Survey of Operating Systems Ch 07
Survey of Operating Systems Ch 07
Survey of Operating Systems Ch 07
Survey of Operating Systems Ch 07
Survey of Operating Systems Ch 07
Survey of Operating Systems Ch 07
Survey of Operating Systems Ch 07
Survey of Operating Systems Ch 07
Survey of Operating Systems Ch 07
Survey of Operating Systems Ch 07
Survey of Operating Systems Ch 07
Survey of Operating Systems Ch 07
Survey of Operating Systems Ch 07
Survey of Operating Systems Ch 07
Survey of Operating Systems Ch 07
Survey of Operating Systems Ch 07
Survey of Operating Systems Ch 07
Survey of Operating Systems Ch 07
Survey of Operating Systems Ch 07
Survey of Operating Systems Ch 07
Survey of Operating Systems Ch 07
Survey of Operating Systems Ch 07
Survey of Operating Systems Ch 07
Survey of Operating Systems Ch 07
Survey of Operating Systems Ch 07
Survey of Operating Systems Ch 07
Survey of Operating Systems Ch 07
Survey of Operating Systems Ch 07
Survey of Operating Systems Ch 07
Survey of Operating Systems Ch 07
Survey of Operating Systems Ch 07
Survey of Operating Systems Ch 07
Survey of Operating Systems Ch 07
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Survey of Operating Systems Ch 07

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  • Start out the lecture with Windows Explorer open and be prepared to locate the registry files as you discuss them. Then, a Try This activity involves running Registry Editor in order to view the registry structure. he objective of this section is to give the students an understanding of the function of the registry, its pieces and parts, and the location of registry hive files. e don’t encourage them to actually modify the registry, but to understand that many things they do day-to-day modify the registry. Step-by-Step 7.01 guides them through using System Restore to create a restore point, an indirect way to back up the entire registry and more. This section concludes with a brief description of how to backup just a portion of the registry using Registry Editor.
  • Open REGEDIT during this part of the lecture, and instruct the students to follow the instructions in the Try This on page 245 to open this program and view the registry structure. Then demonstrate the hierarchical structure of the registry and point out the key points. This section has several key terms. Be sure to use the text and the REGEDIT program to differentiate among these registry components.
  • Step-by-Step 7.01 guides the students through using System Restore to create a restore point, an indirect way to back up the entire registry and more.
  • Explain that at every startup the Windows OS is "rebuilt" from the ground up through six phases. Then continue with the description of these phases. Also, point out that Beginning with Windows Vista, the Windows files involved in the Windows startup changed, and that the text describes the differences.
  • Point out that the Windows Vista/Windows 7 BOOTMGR and WINLOAD.EXE files together replace the functions of the old NTLDR file. These newer versions of Windows do not need NTLDR, BOOT.INI, and NTDETECT.COM, but BOOT.INI and NTDETECT.COM will be present on a computer that multi-boots between an old OS and Windows Vista or newer.
  • Emphasize that much happens during the logon phase in addition to logon
  • This example is not in the book.
  • Step-by-Step 7.02 Modifying System Startup for Windows 7. Point out that, as with previous versions of Windows, you can modify some startup settings through the GUI, which this exercise demonstrates. Beginning in Step 4, they will also run BCDEDIT to see the contents of BCD, including the change made through Startup and Recovery.
  • Allow the students the few minutes required to complete the Try This on page 257. If this is not possible, demonstrate it for them.
  • Windows 7 new Device Stage features provides a “home page” for each device in Devices and Printers.
  • Step-by-Step 7.03 Getting to Know Device Manager. This exercise has you first create a desktop shortcut to Device Manager. Those using Windows 7 can add an extra step between Steps 2 and 3 and pin Device Manager to the taskbar by simply dragging the new shortcut there. Then delete the desktop shortcut. If you are “lucky,” Device Manager will create a teaching moment by revealing a problem with a device. Be prepared for such a moment by testing this exercise on the lab computers before class and determining a course of action so that you can demonstrate how to solve any discovered problem. Try to hold off on solving the problem until you move into the Troubleshooting section.
  • The System Recovery Options screen (accessed from Repair Your Computer) is shown in Figure 6-11 on Page 203 in Chapter 6.
  • Safe Mode (plain): If Windows will not start normally, but starts up in Safe Mode, see note below under Safe Mode with Networking to determine if the problem is related to a network component (usually the network adapter card). Then use Device Manager (in Safe Mode) to try to determine the problem. Safe Mode with Networking: If Windows will not start normally, but starts up in Safe Mode, then restart and select Safe Mode with Networking. If it will not start in Safe Mode with Networking after previously starting in Safe Mode, the problem is related to a network component (usually the network adapter). If the problem appears immediately after installing a new adapter driver, uninstall it and find a new driver. If it appears after an upgrade of the driver, open Device Manager in Safe Mode and roll back the driver. Safe Mode with Command Prompt: If Windows will not start normally, and will not start at all in Safe Mode, then restart and select Safe Mode with Command Prompt.
  • Step-by-Step 7.04 Using Windows in Safe Mode: This exercise gives the students experience restarting Windows in Safe Mode, and has them browse through Windows Help and Support, which displays by default in Safe Mode in Windows 7. This shows them the recovery tools they can easily access while in Safe Mode.
  • Open MSCONFIG, following the Try This on page 270, and give the students a tour of the myriad settings they can modify. This is a great “what-if” tool for testing various scenarios when troubleshooting. Show them how you can also use this tool to select Safe Mode (by another name). If time permits, demonstrate using this to modify startup and restart your system. Then, again time-permitting, have the students do this on their own, as described in the Project at the end of this Chapter’s Instructor Manual.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Chapter 7 Under the Windows Desktop McGraw-Hill
    • 2. Learning Outcomes
      • Define the role of the registry in Windows, and back up and modify the registry when needed
      • Describe the Windows startup process
      • Install and manage device drivers
      • Troubleshoot common Windows problems
    • 3. Understanding the Registry
      • The Registry Defined
        • Database of configuration settings for
          • Device drivers
          • Services
          • Installed application programs
          • Operating system components
          • User Preferences
    • 4. Understanding the Registry
      • Automatic Registry Changes when:
        • Windows starts up or shuts down
        • Windows Setup runs
        • Changes are mode through a Control Panel applet
        • A new device is installed
        • Any changes are made to the Windows configuration
        • Any changes are made to a user’s preferences
        • An application is installed or modified
        • Changes are made to application user preferences
    • 5. Adding a new device creates changes in the registry
    • 6. Understanding the Registry (cont.)
      • Registry Files (hives)
        • DEFAULT
        • NTUSER.DAT
        • SAM
        • SECURITY
        • SOFTWARE
        • SYSTEM
    • 7. Understanding the Registry (cont.)
      • Registry file locations
        • C:WINDOWSSYSTEM32CONFIG
          • All but NTUSER.DAT
    • 8. Figure 7-1 This view of the CONFIG folder shows registry files
    • 9. Understanding the Registry (cont.)
      • Registry File Descriptions
        • SYSTEM
          • What to load at startup
          • Order of loading at startup
          • Settings for drivers, services, OS components
        • SOFTWARE
          • Settings for installed software
          • Other configuration information
        • SECURITY
          • Security policies
    • 10. Understanding the Registry (cont.)
      • Registry File Descriptions
        • SAM
          • Security Accounts Manager
          • Local security accounts database
        • DEFAULT
          • User profile settings
          • Used when no user is logged on
          • Logon screen
    • 11. Understanding the Registry (cont.)
      • Registry File Descriptions
        • NTUSER.DATA
          • User profile for a single user
          • Application preferences, screen colors, and more
          • After a user logs on, that user’s NTUSER.DAT is loaded
          • Saved in top-level personal folder for the user
          • Hidden file
    • 12. Figure 7-2 The default user profile used until a user logs on
    • 13. Table 7-1 Locations of the Hives within the Registry
    • 14. Understanding the Registry (cont.)
      • Viewing and Editing the Registry
        • View and edit the registry with REGEDIT.EXE
        • Navigation similar to Windows Explorer
        • Key: a folder containing settings and other keys
        • Root keys: five keys at the top of the hierarchy
        • Value entry: settings within a key
        • Data type: format of a value entry
    • 15. Figure 7-3 The registry root keys
    • 16. Figure 7-4 Registry components
    • 17. Table 7-2 Contents of Registry Root Keys
    • 18. Table 7-3 Windows Registry Data Types (The Short List)
    • 19. Understanding the Registry (cont.)
      • Backing up the Registry
        • Create a Restore Point
          • Backs up the registry and the entire OS
        • Use REDEGIT to back up all or a portion
          • Use Export Registry File option
          • Double-click on the .REG file to restore
    • 20. Step-by-Step 7.01 Creating a Restore Point in System Restore Understanding the Registry
    • 21. Back up a registry key and all its subkeys and values
    • 22. The Windows Startup Process
      • Phases of the Startup Process
        • Power-on Self-test
        • Initial Startup
        • Boot Loader
          • Windows XP Boot Loader Phase
            • NTLDR reads BOOT.INI
          • Windows Vista and Windows 7 Boot Loader Phase
            • BOOTMGR (boot loader) reads BCD
            • WINLOAD.EXE is OS loader
        • Detect and Configure Hardware
    • 23. The Windows Startup Process
      • Phases of the Startup Process (cont.)
        • Kernel Loading
          • NTOSKRNL.EXE loads into memory
          • Hardware abstraction layer (HAL) loads
          • System portion of the registry loads
          • Drivers required at startup load
          • Kernel initializes services and drivers and loads other code
          • Kernel switches Windows to GUI mode
          • CSRSS.EXE user-mode code starts
          • PAGEFILE.SYS created and WINLOGON.EXE started
    • 24. This Windows 7 screen displays during kernel loading
    • 25. The Windows Startup Process
      • Phases of the Startup Process (cont.)
        • Logon
          • User Logon
          • Program Startup
          • Plug and Play Detection
    • 26. Figure 7-5 Log on to Windows 7
    • 27. The Windows Startup Process
      • Modifying System Startup
        • Modifying System Startup for Windows XP
          • BOOT.INI must be modified directly or indirectly
          • System Properties | Advanced | Startup and Recovery
    • 28. Figure 7-6 The Advanced System Settings in Windows XP
    • 29. The Windows Startup Process
      • BOOT.INI for a Dual-boot System
              • [boot loader]
              • timeout=30
              • default=multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)WINDOWS
              • [operating systems]
              • multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)WINDOWS=”Windows XP
              • Professional”/fastdetect
              • multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(2)WINNT=”Windows 2000
              • Professional”/fastdetect
    • 30. The Windows Startup Process
      • Simple BOOT.INI
              • [boot loader]
              • timeout=30
              • default=multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)WINDOWS
              • [operating systems]
              • multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)WINDOWS=”Windows XP
              • Professional”/fastdetect
    • 31. The Windows Startup Process
      • Modifying System Startup for Windows Vista and Windows 7
        • Boot configuration database (BCD) is a hidden part of the registry
          • C:BOOTBCD
          • Contains
            • Locale information
            • Location of the boot disk
            • Location of the Windows files
            • Other startup information
    • 32. The Windows Startup Process
      • Modifying System Startup for Windows Vista and Windows 7
        • Directly edit BDC using BCDEDIT
        • Modify in Startup and Recovery dialog
    • 33. Step-by-Step 7.02 Modifying System Startup for Windows 7 Understanding the Registry
    • 34. Installing and Managing Device Drivers
      • Finding Device Drivers
        • In addition to drivers that are available on the Windows distribution CD, you can find more current drivers:
          • On the disc that came with the device
          • On the Web site of the manufacturer of the device
    • 35. Figure 7-7 A list of drivers for a device
    • 36. Installing and Managing Device Drivers
      • Installing Device Drivers
        • Windows comes with a huge cache of device drivers
        • Windows and virtually all devices for PCs are plug and play
        • Some devices require that you install the driver before connecting the device
        • Always read the instructions
    • 37. Installing and Managing Device Drivers
      • Installing Device Drivers (cont.)
        • Permissions
          • Administrator privileges to install
            • An administrator must log on for Windows XP
            • Respond to UAC prompts in Windows Vista and Windows 7
    • 38. Installing and Managing Device Drivers
      • Installing Device Drivers (cont.)
        • Signed versus Unsigned Device Drivers
          • Code signing an encrypted digital signature in the file
          • Driver signing is code signing of device driers
    • 39. Installing and Managing Device Drivers
      • Managing Installed Devices
        • Disconnecting Devices
          • Does not uninstall driver
          • Use Safely Remove Hardware for storage devices
      The Windows XP Safely Remove Hardware icon
    • 40. Figure 7-9 Safely Remove Hardware dialog box
    • 41. Figure 7-10 Select Safely Remove Hardware from the hidden icons
    • 42. Figure 7-11 Select the device you wish to disconnect
    • 43. Figure 7-12 Now it is safe to disconnect the hardware
    • 44. Installing and Managing Device Drivers
      • Managing Installed Devices (cont.)
        • Devices and Printers
        • Overview of most obvious devices
        • Access to tools for each device
    • 45. Figure 7-13 The Devices and Printers page
    • 46. Figure 7-14 The Device Stage page for a printer
    • 47. Installing and Managing Device Drivers
      • Managing Installed Devices (cont.)
        • Using Device Manager to Manage Device Drivers
          • View and change device properties
          • Update device drivers
          • Configure Device settings
          • Uninstall devices
          • Roll back driver update
    • 48. Step-by-Step 7.03 Getting to Know Device Manager Understanding the Registry
    • 49. Troubleshooting Windows Problems
      • Troubleshooting with Modified Startups
        • The Advanced Boot Options Menu
          • Repair Your Computer (Windows 7 Only)
          • Startup Repair
          • System Restore
          • System Image Recovery
          • Windows Memory Diagnostic
          • Command Prompt
        • Safe Mode (three variants)
    • 50. Figure 7-15 The Windows Advanced Options Menu for Windows XP
    • 51. Figure 7-16 The Windows Vista Advanced Boot Options Menu
    • 52. Figure 7-17 The Windows 7 Advanced Boot Options Menu
    • 53. Troubleshooting Windows Problems
      • Troubleshooting with Modified Startups
        • The Advanced Boot Options Menu (cont.)
          • Safe Mode (three variants) (cont.)
            • Safe Mode — loads only basic, non-vendor-specific drivers
            • Safe Mode with Networking — like Safe Mode, but with network support
            • Safe Mode with Command Prompt — Safe Mode with only a command prompt as a user interface
          • Enable Boot Logging
    • 54. Troubleshooting Windows Problems
      • Troubleshooting with Modified Startups
        • The Advanced Boot Options Menu (cont.)
          • Enable Low-Resolution Video
          • Last Known Good Configuration
          • Directory Services Restore Mode
          • Debugging Mode — very advanced (may be obsolete)
          • Disable Automatic Restart on System Failure
          • Disable Driver Signature Enforcement
          • Start Windows Normally
          • Reboot (Windows XP only)
          • Return to OS Choices Menu (Multi-Boot Only)
    • 55. Step-by-Step 7.04 Using Windows in Safe Mode Troubleshooting Windows Problems
    • 56. Troubleshooting Windows Problems
      • Troubleshooting with Modified Startups (cont.)
        • Troubleshooting with System Configuration Utility (MSCONFIG)
          • Executable name: MSCONFIG
          • GUI tool
          • Temporarily modifies system startup for testing scenarios
    • 57. Figure 7-18 System Configuration (MSCONFIG) lets you test startup scenarios
    • 58. Troubleshooting Windows Problems
      • Troubleshooting Device Problems
        • Device manager shows a yellow exclamation mark next to a device with a problem
        • Problems include hardware, driver, or the ability of the OS to automatically configure it
        • For more information double-click the device icon to open Properties
        • The Device Status box may recommend an action, such as updating
        • Check out Driver page for a device
    • 59. Figure 7-19 A problem with a device
    • 60. Figure 7-20 The Device status box will describe the problem and recommend action to solve it
    • 61. Figure 7-21 After installing the device driver, Windows places the device under the Network Infrastructure Device category
    • 62. Figure 7-22 The Roll Back Driver button is active only after a driver update
    • 63. Chapter 7 Summary
      • LO 7.1 Understanding the Registry
        • The registry is a database of all configuration settings in Windows. Avoid directly editing the registry, because you can cause severe damage. The Control Panel applets provide a safe way to edit the registry.
    • 64. Chapter 7 Summary
      • LO 7.1 Understanding the Registry (cont.)
        • Windows creates the registry during setup and modifies it any time a setup or installation program runs after that, and during startup and shutdown. Windows also modifies it anytime it installs a device driver and whenever it configures any application, Windows component, or device.
    • 65. Chapter 7 Summary
      • LO 7.1 Understanding the Registry (cont.)
        • Most of the registry is in several files, called hives. They include SYSTEM, SOFTWARE, SECURITY, SAM, DEFAULT, and NTUSER.DAT. These are the permanent portions of the registry.
        • You view the registry in a hierarchical folder structure in Registry Editor.
    • 66. Chapter 7 Summary
      • LO 7.1 Understanding the Registry (cont.)
        • A key is a folder object that can contain one or more sets of settings as well as other keys.
        • There are five top-level keys, or root keys.
        • A key that exists within another key is called a subkey.
        • Settings within a key are value entries. Each value entry has a name, type, and data.
    • 67. Chapter 7 Summary
      • LO 7.2 The Windows Startup Process
        • The phases of the Windows startup process are: Power-on self-test (POST), Initial startup, Boot loader, Detect and configure hardware, Kernel loading, and Logon.
    • 68. Chapter 7 Summary
      • LO 7.2 The Windows Startup Process (cont.)
        • If necessary, modify system startup using the Startup and recovery page in System Properties. You can also modify the BOOT.INI (Windows XP) and BCD (Windows Vista/ Windows 7) files directly to modify startup, but only very advanced techs should do this.
    • 69. Chapter 7 Summary
      • LO 7.3 Installing and Managing Device Drivers
        • A device driver is program code, created by the device manufacturer, that allows an OS to control a physical device. Look for device drivers on the disk or CD that comes with a device or at the Web site of the manufacturer.
    • 70. Chapter 7 Summary
      • LO 7.3 Installing and Managing Device Drivers
        • You need Administrator privileges to install any device driver in Windows.
        • Once a device is installed, a standard user may disconnect and reconnect the device without restriction—the driver will not be uninstalled.
    • 71. Chapter 7 Summary
      • LO 7.3 Installing and Managing Device Drivers
        • Code signing exists to avoid problems caused by badly written code. It involves a digital signature, provided by Microsoft as a seal of approval of program code.
    • 72. Chapter 7 Summary
      • LO 7.3 Installing and Managing Device Drivers
        • Always read the manufacturer’s documentation, and follow the instructions before attempting to install a device driver, whether it is plug-and-play or not.
    • 73. Chapter 7 Summary
      • LO 7.3 Installing and Managing Device Drivers
        • When an administrator installs or connects a plug-and-play device to a Windows computer, the computer will automatically detect the device, and install and configure the driver with little or no interaction from the user, except to provide the device driver disk if requested.
    • 74. Chapter 7 Summary
      • LO 7.3 Installing and Managing Device Drivers
        • Plug-and-play devices connected to USB or IEEE 1394 (FireWire) can be disconnected without restarting Windows, but you should use the Safely Remove Hardware applet before disconnecting.
        • Device manager is the Windows tool for managing and troubleshooting device problems.
    • 75. Chapter 7 Summary
      • LO 7.4 Troubleshooting Windows Problems
        • Windows offers a variety of startup options, and some are well suited for troubleshooting. These include the Advanced Boot Options menu and the System Configuration utility. Both allow you to select from several options for restarting Windows.
    • 76. Chapter 7 Summary
      • LO 7.4 Troubleshooting Windows Problems
        • Device Manager is the primary tool for troubleshooting device problems. A yellow exclamation mark on a device in Device manager indicates a problem. Open the properties dialog box to see an explanation.
    • 77. Chapter 7 Summary
      • LO 7.4 Troubleshooting Windows Problems
        • Use Device Manager to uninstall, update, and remove device drivers. You can also use it to disable a device without removing the driver.

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