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Survey of Operating Systems Ch 03
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  • Discussion Point: In some ways, a thin client seems to be just a newer version of a dumb terminal. However, there is a significant difference—local processing capability. A dumb terminal had no native processing power, while a thin client is a PC, which by definition has local processing power.
  • Discussion Point: In some ways, a thin client seems to be just a newer version of a dumb terminal. However, there is a significant difference—local processing capability. A dumb terminal had no native processing power, while a thin client is a PC, which by definition has local processing power.
  • A Windows XP host must have Service Pack 3
  • The processor models are out-dated, and should only be seen as minimums.
  • Point out that Microsoft recommends Windows XP Mode and Windows Virtual PC for small and midsize business. For larger businesses, MS recommends the Microsoft Enterprise Desktop Virtualization (MED-V), server-based desktop virtualization.
  • Point out that a “free trial” is a limit-time trial, and that the software will not work after the trial period (often 30 days) unless the user pays a fee.
  • Suggest that students print the Installation and Setup Guide the first time they run Boot Camp Assistant. They can choose to print it to a PDF. Also, point out that Boot Camp Assistant takes the existing single partition and repartitions it into two partitions.
  • Suggest that students print the Installation and Setup Guide the first time they run Boot Camp Assistant. They can choose to print it to a PDF. Also, point out that Boot Camp Assistant takes the existing single partition and repartitions it into two partitions.
  • In this exercise students will install VirtualBox from the disk image they downloaded in the Try This! on page 95. Then they will configure a virtual machine for Windows 7. You may want to hold off on having them install the OS until Step-by-Step 6.02 in Chapter 6.
  • Explain that all hypervisors have software for added support for popular guest OSs, and that they should always install this software after installing the guest OS. Reminders will display in the guest OS.

Transcript

  • 1. Chapter 3 Desktop Virtualization McGraw-Hill
  • 2. Learning Objectives
    • Explain the evolution of desktop virtualiza-tion and understand the common features of today’s desktop virtualization products
    • Select and implement a desktop virtualiza- tion option on a Windows Vista or Windows 7 desktop
    • Describe desktop virtualization options for a Mac OS X desktop
  • 3. Virtualization Overview
    • Ubiquity of Virtualization
      • Virtualization
      • Virtual world
      • Storage virtualization
      • Network virtualization
      • Server virtualization
      • Desktop virtualization
      • Virtual machine
      • Application virtualization
  • 4. Figure 3-1 VMware's Virtual Pavilion showing Jane’s avatar (JazzyYoda) walking into an exhibitor’s virtual booth.
  • 5. Virtualization Overview
    • Your (Great?) Grandfather’s Virtual Machine
      • Dumb terminal
      • Terminal services
      • Terminal client
  • 6. A 1970s-era computer terminal
    • Source: Chilton Computing/Atlas Computing Division/Rutherford Library.
  • 7. Virtualization Overview
    • Today’s Virtual Desktops
      • Server-based virtual desktop
        • Thin client connects to a server
        • Client works in the server-hosted environment
        • Most of processing done at server
        • Virtual desktop infrastructure (VDI)
  • 8. Virtualization Overview
    • Today’s Virtual Desktops (cont.)
      • Desktop-based Desktops
        • Virtual desktop on local computer
        • User can switch between host OS and guest OS
        • Processing done locally
  • 9. Virtualization Overview
    • Hypervisor/Virtual Machine Monitor (VMM)
      • Type I
        • Bare-metal hypervisor
        • Runs directly on a computer without a host OS
        • First appeared on servers
      • Type II
        • Requires a host OS
  • 10. Figure 3-2 A Windows 7 virtual machine running in OS X on an Apple computer
  • 11. Virtualization Overview
    • Tasks for creating a virtual machine
      • Prepare the computer
      • Install the hypervisor
      • Install a virtual machine
      • Install the guest OS
      • Install guest utilities and secure guest OS
      • Locate and practice with host key
  • 12. Figure 3-3 Installing a hypervisor
  • 13. Virtualization Overview
    • Major Hypervisor Sources
      • Citrix
      • VMware
      • Parallels
      • Microsoft
      • Oracle
  • 14. Desktop VMs on Windows Desktops
    • Microsoft Virtual PC 2007
      • Requirements
        • Host OS
          • Windows Vista Business, Enterprise, Ultimate
          • Windows Server 2003, Standard 32-bit and 64-bit
          • Windows XP Professional 32-bit and 64-bit
          • Windows XP Tablet PC
  • 15. Desktop VMs on Windows Desktops
    • Microsoft Virtual PC 2007 (cont.)
      • Recommended
        • Host Hardware
          • X64 or x86-based computer with 1 GHz processor with L2 cache
          • Processor: AMD Athlon or Duron, Intel Celeron, Intel Pentium II, Intel Pentium III, Intel Pentium 4, Intel Core Duo, or Intel Core2 Duo
  • 16. Step-by-Step 3.01 Installing Microsoft Virtual PC 2007 Desktop VMs on Windows Desktops
  • 17. Desktop VMs on Windows Desktops
    • Microsoft Virtual PC 2007 (cont.)
      • Creating a Virtual Machine in Virtual PC
        • Start Virtual PC 2007 from Start | All Programs
        • New Virtual Machine Wizard
          • Create a customized VM
          • Create a VM with the defaults for the client
          • Add a pre-existing VM
          • Start VM with distribution disc in drive
  • 18. Figure 3-4 Select the correct option
  • 19. Figure 3-5 Enter a name for the virtual machine
  • 20. Figure 3-6 Select from the list of supported OSs
  • 21. Figure 3-7 Select from the list of supported OSs
  • 22. Desktop VMs on Windows Desktops
    • Windows XP Mode and Windows Virtual PC
      • Windows XP Mode for Windows 7
        • Windows Virtual PC with Windows XP preinstalled
        • Use to run legacy applications
  • 23. Desktop VMs on Windows Desktops
    • Windows Virtual PC for Windows 7
      • Guest OSs
        • Windows Vista
        • Windows 2000
        • Linux
      • Requires hardware-assisted virtualization
        • Use the Hardware-Assisted Virtualization Detection Tool
  • 24. The Virtual PC download page
  • 25. Figure 3-8 This computer cannot run Windows Virtual PC
  • 26. Desktop VMs on Windows Desktops
    • VMware Player
      • VMware has produced VM software for 10 years+
      • VMware Player is a desktop hypervisor
        • Available as a free trial
        • Three versions
          • 32-bit/64-bit for Windows hosts
          • 32-bit for Linux hosts
          • 64-bit for Linux hosts
  • 27. Figure 3-9 Download the trial version of VMware to test it before deciding to buy it
  • 28. Desktop VMs on Windows Desktops
    • Oracle VirtualBox
      • Host OSs
        • Windows
        • Linux
        • Mac OS X
      • Client OSs
        • Windows
        • Linux
        • DOS
      • Does not require virtualization hardware
  • 29. Desktop VMs on Mac OS X
    • Apple Boot Camp
      • Not really a virtualization option
      • Multi-boot between Mac OSX and Windows
      • Requirements
        • Intel-based Mac
        • Mac OS X 10.6 or later strongly recommended
        • Keyboard and point device
        • Built-in optical disk drive or compatible external drive
        • Mac OS X installation disc
  • 30. Desktop VMs on Mac OS X
    • Apple Boot Camp (cont.)
      • Requirements
        • Intel-based Mac
        • Mac OS X 10.6 or later strongly recommended
        • Keyboard and point device
        • Built-in optical disk drive or compatible external drive
        • Mac OS X installation disc
      • Client OSs
        • Windows XP Home or Professional Edition with SP 2
        • Windows Vista or Windows 7 Home Premium, Professional, or Ultimate
  • 31. Desktop VMs on Mac OS X
    • Apple Boot Camp (cont.)
      • Boot Camp comes with Mac OS X
      • Run Boot Camp Assistant
        • From Applications | Utilities folder
        • Creates a new partition for the Windows OS
  • 32. Figure 3-10 Print the Installation and Setup Guide before proceeding
  • 33. Figure 3-11 Partitioning the hard drive
  • 34. The Boot Camp partition appears with other drives under Devices in the Finder
  • 35. Desktop VMs on Mac OS X
    • Oracle Virtual Box
      • Guests
        • Windows
        • Linux
        • DOS
      • Hardware virtualization not required
      • Download disk image file
      • Install VirtualBox from the disk image
  • 36. Figure 3-12 Downloading VirtualBox
  • 37. Step-by-Step 3.02 Installing Oracle VirtualBox
  • 38. Desktop VMs on Mac OS X
    • Oracle Virtual Box (Continued)
      • Install Guest Additions after installing OS
        • Improves client OS appearance
        • Enables improved drivers for other hardware
  • 39. Figure 3-13 Install the VirtualBox Guest Additions after installing the guest OS
  • 40. Figure 3-14 VirtualBox with several virtual machines
  • 41. Chapter 3 Summary
    • LO 3.1 Virtualization
      • There are many types of virtualization today, such as virtual worlds, storage virtualization, network virtualization, server virtualization, and desktop virtualization—the subject of this chapter.
  • 42. Chapter 3 Summary
      • Virtualization had its roots in the dumb terminal mainframe systems of the 1960s and the terminal service-terminal client systems of the 1990s
      • Today’s virtual desktops can be hosted on network servers or on PCs.
      • A hypervisor, or virtual machine monitor (VMM), is the software that emulates the necessary hardware on which an operating system runs.
  • 43. Chapter 3 Summary
      • A Type I hypervisor (a “bare-metal hypervisor”) runs directly on a computer without an underlying host operating system.
      • A Type II hypervisor requires a host operating system.
      • The major sources of hypervisors are Citrix, VMware, Parallels, Microsoft, and Oracle.
  • 44. Chapter 3 Summary
    • LO 3.2 Desktop VMs on Windows Desktops
      • There are both commercial and free Type II hypervisors for running Linux, DOS, or Windows on a Windows desktop computer.
      • Microsoft Virtual PC 2007 is free and will run on any computer running Windows XP or newer versions of Windows, and it supports Windows, Linux, and DOS guests without requiring hardware-assisted virtualization.
  • 45. Chapter 3 Summary
      • Windows XP Mode is a free hypervisor that installs on a Windows 7 host with a Windows XP guest preinstalled. It does not require hardware-assisted virtualization.
      • The free Windows Virtual PC requires both Windows 7 and hardware-assisted virtualization. Use the Hardware-Assisted Virtualization Detection Tool to test your computer before you download one of these solutions.
  • 46. Chapter 3 Summary
      • VMware has several commercial hypervisor products. Download and install the trial version of VMware player to temporarily test this product before buying it.
      • Oracle VirtualBox is free and runs on several hosts including versions of Windows, Linux, and Mac OS X. It will run on hardware that does not support virtualization.
  • 47. Chapter 3 Summary
    • LO 3.2 Desktop VMs on Mac OS X
      • You have several choices for hypervisors for Mac OS X that will run versions of Windows and Linux.
      • Apple Boot Camp is not actually a hypervisor so much as a dual boot option that allows you to dual-boot between Mac OS X and Windows. This gives each OS full use of the hardware, but only one can be loaded at a time.
  • 48. Chapter 3 Summary
      • Oracle VirtualBox is a free hypervisor and will run versions of Windows, Linux, and DOS on hardware that does not support virtualization.
      • Parallels is a commercial hypervisor product for Apple and other hosts, mentioned, but not detailed in this chapter.