Handbook of Informatics for Nurses & Healthcare Professionals                                          Fifth Edition      ...
Learning Outcomes1. Understand the continuity life cycle.2. Provide the reasons why continuity   planning is important.3. ...
Learning Outcomes (cont’d)5. Outline the steps of the continuity   planning process.6. Review the advantages associated   ...
Learning Outcomes (cont’d)8. Discuss how information obtained from   a mock or an actual disaster can be   used to improve...
Continuity Planning• Process of ensuring uninterrupted  operation of critical services regardless  of any event that may o...
Continuity Plan• Critical part of risk management  strategy• Can ensure institutional survival• Development is the most di...
Disaster• Occurrence that disrupts or disables  necessary functions and has the  potential to destroy an organization by  ...
Comprehensive Plan•   The   emergency plan•   The   backup plan•   The   recovery plan•   The   test plan•   The   mainten...
Steps of the Continuity       Planning Process• Business impact assessment or analysis  (BIA)• Planning• Implementation of...
FIGURE 22–1   BCP life cycle stages              Handbook of Informatics for Nurses & Healthcare Professionals, Fifth Edit...
Business Impact Assessment or        Analysis (BIA)• Determine critical functions of the  organization and information vit...
Information That Supports       the Organization• Vendor contracts                                        • Building bluep...
Planning Process• Secure top management support and  commitment• Select the planning committee• Risk assessment• Establish...
Plan Components• Vital record                                            • Floor plans for  inventory                     ...
Plan Components• Insurance                                              • Alternative plans to  documents                 ...
Continuity Strategies• Implementation of policies and  procedures• Contracts with vendors and service  providers needed to...
Evaluation• Review for weak spots• Review for currency with changes• Done with test of plan  – Schedule during off-peak ti...
Continuity Planning Advantages• Protects against                                        • Provides for  interrupted       ...
Continuity Planning Advantages• Expedites reporting                                     • Ensures regulatory  of diagnosti...
Threats to Business Operation and    Information Systems (IS) • Environmental                                           • ...
Continuity and Recovery Options• Guide the selection of computer  services, hardware, and software• Hardware redundancy—fi...
Data Backup• Goal: Continuous delivery of services• Options for zero downtime are  expensive• Common anti-disaster protect...
Manual vs. Automated         Alternatives• Implications for delivery of care, record  management, and employee training• C...
Downtime or Backup Procedures• Different means to accomplish a  common task than what is ordinarily  used such as paper re...
Restoration• Stored materials reloaded onto system  from outside sites• Information may be restored from  remote sites• Ho...
Salvage• May be necessary to attempt to  retrieve information from damaged  equipment and storage media  – Stabilize site ...
Recovery Costs• Lost consumer confidence and profits• Temporary services, space, equipment,  utilities, personnel• Shippin...
Planning Pitfalls• Insufficient funding• Lack of access to the plan• Failure to include all information and  devices• Fail...
Planning Pitfalls• Failure to update• Failure to test• Failure to consider the human  component     Handbook of Informatic...
Legal and Accreditation         Requirements• The Health Insurance Portability and  Accountability Act (HIPAA)• Federal In...
Future Directions• Increase need for uninterrupted service  – Competitive advantage  – Regulatory and legal requirements  ...
Future Directions• Increase need for uninterrupted service  – Required for national monitoring of    disease outbreak or a...
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ssues and Trends in HBI Ch22 pp

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  1. 1. Handbook of Informatics for Nurses & Healthcare Professionals Fifth Edition CHAPTER 22 Continuity Planning and Management (Disaster Recovery) Handbook of Informatics for Nurses & Healthcare Professionals, Fifth Edition Toni Hebda • Patricia Czar
  2. 2. Learning Outcomes1. Understand the continuity life cycle.2. Provide the reasons why continuity planning is important.3. Provide a rationale for developing a Business Continuity Plan (BCP).4. Discuss the relationship between continuity planning and disaster recovery. Handbook of Informatics for Nurses & Healthcare Professionals, Fifth Edition Toni Hebda • Patricia Czar
  3. 3. Learning Outcomes (cont’d)5. Outline the steps of the continuity planning process.6. Review the advantages associated with continuity planning.7. Identify events that can threaten business operation and information systems (IS). Handbook of Informatics for Nurses & Healthcare Professionals, Fifth Edition Toni Hebda • Patricia Czar
  4. 4. Learning Outcomes (cont’d)8. Discuss how information obtained from a mock or an actual disaster can be used to improve response and revise continuity plans.9. Discuss legal and accreditation requirements for continuity plans. Handbook of Informatics for Nurses & Healthcare Professionals, Fifth Edition Toni Hebda • Patricia Czar
  5. 5. Continuity Planning• Process of ensuring uninterrupted operation of critical services regardless of any event that may occur• Includes all critical applications, resident data, Web, database, and file servers• Also known as business continuity planning (BCP) or contingency planning Handbook of Informatics for Nurses & Healthcare Professionals, Fifth Edition Toni Hebda • Patricia Czar
  6. 6. Continuity Plan• Critical part of risk management strategy• Can ensure institutional survival• Development is the most difficult aspect of business continuity• Requires expertise from many disciplines• Building continuity into infrastructure helps to prevent many disruptions Handbook of Informatics for Nurses & Healthcare Professionals, Fifth Edition Toni Hebda • Patricia Czar
  7. 7. Disaster• Occurrence that disrupts or disables necessary functions and has the potential to destroy an organization by wiping out financial, administrative, and clinical data needed for ongoing operations• Strikes without warning—must anticipate Handbook of Informatics for Nurses & Healthcare Professionals, Fifth Edition Toni Hebda • Patricia Czar
  8. 8. Comprehensive Plan• The emergency plan• The backup plan• The recovery plan• The test plan• The maintenance plan Handbook of Informatics for Nurses & Healthcare Professionals, Fifth Edition Toni Hebda • Patricia Czar
  9. 9. Steps of the Continuity Planning Process• Business impact assessment or analysis (BIA)• Planning• Implementation of strategies for continuity• Evaluation Handbook of Informatics for Nurses & Healthcare Professionals, Fifth Edition Toni Hebda • Patricia Czar
  10. 10. FIGURE 22–1 BCP life cycle stages Handbook of Informatics for Nurses & Healthcare Professionals, Fifth Edition Toni Hebda • Patricia Czar
  11. 11. Business Impact Assessment or Analysis (BIA)• Determine critical functions of the organization and information vital to maintain these operations – Information needed for healthcare delivery – Information that supports the organization Handbook of Informatics for Nurses & Healthcare Professionals, Fifth Edition Toni Hebda • Patricia Czar
  12. 12. Information That Supports the Organization• Vendor contracts • Building blueprints• Personnel files • Regulatory• Financial or claim compliance documentation documentation• Important e-mails • Equipment• Permits manuals • Reporting data Handbook of Informatics for Nurses & Healthcare Professionals, Fifth Edition Toni Hebda • Patricia Czar
  13. 13. Planning Process• Secure top management support and commitment• Select the planning committee• Risk assessment• Establish processing and operating priorities• Data collection• Write the plan Handbook of Informatics for Nurses & Healthcare Professionals, Fifth Edition Toni Hebda • Patricia Czar
  14. 14. Plan Components• Vital record • Floor plans for inventory water, gas,• Policies and oxygen, cable and procedures power lines, and• Emergency call list exits• Key employee • Diagrams for servers and responsibilities networks, ports• Troubleshooting Handbook of Informatics for Nurses & Healthcare Professionals, Fifth Edition Toni Hebda • Patricia Czar
  15. 15. Plan Components• Insurance • Alternative plans to documents maintain services• Resources needed • Repair and for key services restoration procedures Handbook of Informatics for Nurses & Healthcare Professionals, Fifth Edition Toni Hebda • Patricia Czar
  16. 16. Continuity Strategies• Implementation of policies and procedures• Contracts with vendors and service providers needed to ensure business continuity in the event of a threat or disaster Handbook of Informatics for Nurses & Healthcare Professionals, Fifth Edition Toni Hebda • Patricia Czar
  17. 17. Evaluation• Review for weak spots• Review for currency with changes• Done with test of plan – Schedule during off-peak times – Perform semi-annually• Opportunity to train employees Handbook of Informatics for Nurses & Healthcare Professionals, Fifth Edition Toni Hebda • Patricia Czar
  18. 18. Continuity Planning Advantages• Protects against • Provides for interrupted capture of services information for• Ensures continuity regulatory and of client record and accrediting bodies care Handbook of Informatics for Nurses & Healthcare Professionals, Fifth Edition Toni Hebda • Patricia Czar
  19. 19. Continuity Planning Advantages• Expedites reporting • Ensures regulatory of diagnostic tests compliance• Captures charges, • Establishes backup billing and claims and restoration processing procedures Handbook of Informatics for Nurses & Healthcare Professionals, Fifth Edition Toni Hebda • Patricia Czar
  20. 20. Threats to Business Operation and Information Systems (IS) • Environmental • Overtaxed disasters infrastructure • Human error • Power fluctuations • Sabotage and outages • Acts of terrorism • Equipment failure and bioterrorism • Operating system • High-tech crime or application • Viruses software bugs Handbook of Informatics for Nurses & Healthcare Professionals, Fifth Edition Toni Hebda • Patricia Czar
  21. 21. Continuity and Recovery Options• Guide the selection of computer services, hardware, and software• Hardware redundancy—first line of defense – Allow operations to continue when individual components fail – May have redundancy onsite or at two separate sites Handbook of Informatics for Nurses & Healthcare Professionals, Fifth Edition Toni Hebda • Patricia Czar
  22. 22. Data Backup• Goal: Continuous delivery of services• Options for zero downtime are expensive• Common anti-disaster protection: – Automated backups – Off-site media storage – Data mirroring – Server replication – Remote data replication Handbook of Informatics for Nurses & Healthcare Professionals, Fifth Edition Toni Hebda • Patricia Czar
  23. 23. Manual vs. Automated Alternatives• Implications for delivery of care, record management, and employee training• Costs vary by length of “downtime”• Not feasible to resort to downtime procedures for very short periods of time Handbook of Informatics for Nurses & Healthcare Professionals, Fifth Edition Toni Hebda • Patricia Czar
  24. 24. Downtime or Backup Procedures• Different means to accomplish a common task than what is ordinarily used such as paper requisitions Handbook of Informatics for Nurses & Healthcare Professionals, Fifth Edition Toni Hebda • Patricia Czar
  25. 25. Restoration• Stored materials reloaded onto system from outside sites• Information may be restored from remote sites• Hot site services at other locations duplicate information systems and data Handbook of Informatics for Nurses & Healthcare Professionals, Fifth Edition Toni Hebda • Patricia Czar
  26. 26. Salvage• May be necessary to attempt to retrieve information from damaged equipment and storage media – Stabilize site – Use expert services Handbook of Informatics for Nurses & Healthcare Professionals, Fifth Edition Toni Hebda • Patricia Czar
  27. 27. Recovery Costs• Lost consumer confidence and profits• Temporary services, space, equipment, utilities, personnel• Shipping and installation costs• Post-disaster replacement of equipment and repairs• Overtime hours for staff• Reconstruction of lost data Handbook of Informatics for Nurses & Healthcare Professionals, Fifth Edition Toni Hebda • Patricia Czar
  28. 28. Planning Pitfalls• Insufficient funding• Lack of access to the plan• Failure to include all information and devices• Failure to plan for regional disasters• Failure to incorporate data growth Handbook of Informatics for Nurses & Healthcare Professionals, Fifth Edition Toni Hebda • Patricia Czar
  29. 29. Planning Pitfalls• Failure to update• Failure to test• Failure to consider the human component Handbook of Informatics for Nurses & Healthcare Professionals, Fifth Edition Toni Hebda • Patricia Czar
  30. 30. Legal and Accreditation Requirements• The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA)• Federal Information Privacy and Security Act of 2002• Pandemic and All-Hazards Preparedness Act• The Joint Commission• Sarbanes-Oxley Act Handbook of Informatics for Nurses & Healthcare Professionals, Fifth Edition Toni Hebda • Patricia Czar
  31. 31. Future Directions• Increase need for uninterrupted service – Competitive advantage – Regulatory and legal requirements – Institutional survival – Essential for safety and quality of care Handbook of Informatics for Nurses & Healthcare Professionals, Fifth Edition Toni Hebda • Patricia Czar
  32. 32. Future Directions• Increase need for uninterrupted service – Required for national monitoring of disease outbreak or activity suspicious of bioterrorism – Use post-disaster feedback to improve planning Handbook of Informatics for Nurses & Healthcare Professionals, Fifth Edition Toni Hebda • Patricia Czar

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