Issues and Trends in HBI Ch11 pp

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Issues and Trends in HBI Ch11 pp

  1. 1. Handbook of Informatics for Nurses & Healthcare Professionals Fifth Edition CHAPTER 11 Information Systems Training Handbook of Informatics for Nurses & Healthcare Professionals, Fifth Edition Toni Hebda • Patricia Czar
  2. 2. Learning Outcomes1. Describe how learning needs and objectives are determined for end users.2. List content areas required for information system training.3. Identify human factors related to information systems. Handbook of Informatics for Nurses & Healthcare Professionals, Fifth Edition Toni Hebda • Patricia Czar
  3. 3. Learning Outcomes4. Understand training strategies and blended learning as an instructional approach.5. Recognize factors that affect learning and knowledge retention.6. Select training resources that match organizational requirements. Handbook of Informatics for Nurses & Healthcare Professionals, Fifth Edition Toni Hebda • Patricia Czar
  4. 4. Learning Outcomes7. Compare training evaluation methods.8. Discuss issues associated with training, including scheduling, confidentiality, cost, technology, and training environments.9. Explain how user training can be viewed as a return on investment. Handbook of Informatics for Nurses & Healthcare Professionals, Fifth Edition Toni Hebda • Patricia Czar
  5. 5. The Significance of Training• Healthcare workers use information systems to access and document patient information.• Training plays a vital role in the adoption and integration of computer technology. Handbook of Informatics for Nurses & Healthcare Professionals, Fifth Edition Toni Hebda • Patricia Czar
  6. 6. The Training Plan• Must align with the organization’s strategic initiatives• Provides blueprint for how employees will learn new computer skills• Focuses on the development of knowledge and skills in an organized way• Designed to ensure instructional success Handbook of Informatics for Nurses & Healthcare Professionals, Fifth Edition Toni Hebda • Patricia Czar
  7. 7. Training Plan Components• Philosophy• Identification of training needs• Approach• Resources• Timetable and training schedule• Evaluation strategy Handbook of Informatics for Nurses & Healthcare Professionals, Fifth Edition Toni Hebda • Patricia Czar
  8. 8. Philosophy• Demonstrates commitment to the effort, resource allocation, budget, hours, staffing, and timing in relation to go-live date Handbook of Informatics for Nurses & Healthcare Professionals, Fifth Edition Toni Hebda • Patricia Czar
  9. 9. Training Needs Assessment• Who?• What?• When?• How?• How long?• Where?• With what? Handbook of Informatics for Nurses & Healthcare Professionals, Fifth Edition Toni Hebda • Patricia Czar
  10. 10. Approach• Follows needs assessment• Determines – Content – Instructional interventions – Delivery methods – Creation or purchase of training materials – In-house trainers vs. outsourced training Handbook of Informatics for Nurses & Healthcare Professionals, Fifth Edition Toni Hebda • Patricia Czar
  11. 11. Resources• Where will the budget for resources come from? – Salaries for trainers, support staff, replacement staff, and employees trained constitute the largest item in a training budget.• Who will coordinate training?• Who will teach? Handbook of Informatics for Nurses & Healthcare Professionals, Fifth Edition Toni Hebda • Patricia Czar
  12. 12. Timetable and Training Schedule• Coordinated with go-live date• Considerations: – Number of persons to be trained – Amount of time required to train each user group – Amount of time needed for all training – Budget requirements Handbook of Informatics for Nurses & Healthcare Professionals, Fifth Edition Toni Hebda • Patricia Czar
  13. 13. Evaluation• Proficiency testing – May be done electronically – Can provide immediate feedback – Reflects need for basic skills to perform job• Need to incorporate procedures• Must consider how remediation will be handled Handbook of Informatics for Nurses & Healthcare Professionals, Fifth Edition Toni Hebda • Patricia Czar
  14. 14. End Users• Healthcare workers who use an information system to view or document client information Handbook of Informatics for Nurses & Healthcare Professionals, Fifth Edition Toni Hebda • Patricia Czar
  15. 15. User Class• Grouped by job class responsibilities• Users who perform similar functions constitute a “class”• Classes determine applications and level of access needed as well as training content and time Handbook of Informatics for Nurses & Healthcare Professionals, Fifth Edition Toni Hebda • Patricia Czar
  16. 16. Training Class Content• Computer-related • Screen and system policies “freezes”• Access privileges • System• Human factors idiosyncrasies• Computer literacy • Electronic help• Workflow • Error messages • Error correction Handbook of Informatics for Nurses & Healthcare Professionals, Fifth Edition Toni Hebda • Patricia Czar
  17. 17. Training Class Content• Maintenance and basic troubleshooting• Downtime procedures• Retrieval of information and other functions• Realistic situations Handbook of Informatics for Nurses & Healthcare Professionals, Fifth Edition Toni Hebda • Patricia Czar
  18. 18. Training Schedule Considerations• Length of training day• Off-shift and weekend classes• Overtime vs. part of regular work hours• Training before or after work shifts• Preparation time for classes• Convenience of training location Handbook of Informatics for Nurses & Healthcare Professionals, Fifth Edition Toni Hebda • Patricia Czar
  19. 19. Training Schedule Considerations• Hardware, software, and environment requirements need to mirror those in the work environment. Handbook of Informatics for Nurses & Healthcare Professionals, Fifth Edition Toni Hebda • Patricia Czar
  20. 20. Training Approaches• Instructor led• Technology based• On-the-job training• Blended approach• Adjunct aids Handbook of Informatics for Nurses & Healthcare Professionals, Fifth Edition Toni Hebda • Patricia Czar
  21. 21. Instructor-Led Training• Classroom techniques that engage the participants, such as active participation, group activities, hands-on exercises, and other various instructional approaches enhance attention and learning Handbook of Informatics for Nurses & Healthcare Professionals, Fifth Edition Toni Hebda • Patricia Czar
  22. 22. Technology-Based Training• Uses technology to teach technology• Computer-based training• Web-based training Handbook of Informatics for Nurses & Healthcare Professionals, Fifth Edition Toni Hebda • Patricia Czar
  23. 23. On-the-Job Training• Appropriate for short sessions• Subject to interruptions• May or may not catch all the people who need training Handbook of Informatics for Nurses & Healthcare Professionals, Fifth Edition Toni Hebda • Patricia Czar
  24. 24. Blended Training Approach• Maximizes retention• Targets different learning styles• Encourages active participation Handbook of Informatics for Nurses & Healthcare Professionals, Fifth Edition Toni Hebda • Patricia Czar
  25. 25. Training Materials• Must be well designed and reflect “real” system• Learning aids supplement training – Outlines – Charts – Diagrams• Job aids—written instructions for use in training and work settings Handbook of Informatics for Nurses & Healthcare Professionals, Fifth Edition Toni Hebda • Patricia Czar
  26. 26. Trainer Selection• Prior teaching skills and experience• Ability to interact with others• Must understand various user classes and job needs• Familiarity with different training approaches• Centralized versus departmental training Handbook of Informatics for Nurses & Healthcare Professionals, Fifth Edition Toni Hebda • Patricia Czar
  27. 27. Trainer Selection• Information services staff – Know technology but not local workflow – May lack training expertise• Hospital or staff development educators – Have training expertise Handbook of Informatics for Nurses & Healthcare Professionals, Fifth Edition Toni Hebda • Patricia Czar
  28. 28. Trainer Selection• Super users – Understand department workflow• Department supervisors – May lack training expertise – May or may not know area workflow Handbook of Informatics for Nurses & Healthcare Professionals, Fifth Edition Toni Hebda • Patricia Czar
  29. 29. Training Nonemployees• Significant numbers of office staff members and students require training and access• Must consider this population in the overall training plan Handbook of Informatics for Nurses & Healthcare Professionals, Fifth Edition Toni Hebda • Patricia Czar
  30. 30. Training Nonemployees• Must identify most efficient manner to train• Must consider implications for nonemployees who violate need-to- know access Handbook of Informatics for Nurses & Healthcare Professionals, Fifth Edition Toni Hebda • Patricia Czar
  31. 31. Trainer Selection• Information system use is no longer “nice to know”—it is now an essential job skill. Handbook of Informatics for Nurses & Healthcare Professionals, Fifth Edition Toni Hebda • Patricia Czar

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