ELEMENTS OF        ARTS1. LINES     6. SHAPE2. TEXTURE3. FORM4. SPACE5. COLOR
LINES Line is defined as a mark that spans a distance between two points (or the path of a moving point), taking any form...
EXAMPLES OF LINES HORIZONTAL LINES – parallel to the ground                      - means to be at restVERTICAL LINES – mo...
EXAMPLES OF LINES DIAGONAL LINES – lines that are leaning                    - means uncomfortable CURVED LINES – lines ...
EXAMPLES OF LINES Zigzag Lines – combination of diagonal lines               - means action, excitement, confusion
TEXTURE Surface quality of an object The texture is the quality of a surface or the way any work of art is represented. ...
KINDS OF TEXTURES TACTILE TEXTURES – real textures, you can touch                       and feel
KINDS OF TEXTURES ARTIFICIAL TEXTURES – human-made surface                        quality
KINDS OF TEXTURES Visual Textures – revoked by a photograph or picture                   depicting an object             ...
FORM Refers to an object with three dimension (  height, width and depth ) Form may be created by the forming of two or ...
EXAMPLES OF FORM       KAGANAPAN           BY         ABUEVA
EXAMPLES OF FORM     Escaping Criticism             by     Pere Borrel del Caso
SPACE Refers to the distance or area within the objects Space is the area provided for a particular purpose.Space includes...
HILLS OF NIKKO BY JOSE JOYA               THIS             PAINTING            SHOWS AN            ARTWORKS           WITH...
COLOR Derived from reflected light Color pertains to the use of hue in artwork and design. Defined as primary colors (re...
PRIMARY COLORS Primary colors are sets of colors that can be combined to make a useful range of colors. For human applica...
SECONDARY COLORS A secondary color is a color made by mixing two primary colors in a given color space.
COLOR HAS THREE PROPERTIES Hue – is the color’s name Value – is the property of color concerned with the lightness of da...
COMPLEMENTARY COLORSColors opposite to eachother on the color wheelRed and Green arecomplementary colors
MONOCHROMATIC COLOR SCHEMEHarmony of one color and its variations or different values of a single color.A color scheme u...
ANALOGOUS COLORSColors that are sideby side on the colorwheel and share ahue.
SHAPES Two – dimensional figure enclosed by a line. Shape pertains to the use of areas in two dimensional space that can...
GEOMETRIC SHAPES SQUARE, CIRCLE, TRIANGLE RECTANGLE, OVAL Precise shapes
ORGANIC SHAPES These are not regular or not even shapes
THANKSFORLISTENINGAND FOR YOURTIME!!!
Elements of arts
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Elements of arts

  1. 1. ELEMENTS OF ARTS1. LINES 6. SHAPE2. TEXTURE3. FORM4. SPACE5. COLOR
  2. 2. LINES Line is defined as a mark that spans a distance between two points (or the path of a moving point), taking any form along the way. As an art element, line pertains to the use of various marks, outlines and implied lines in artwork and design, most often used to define shape in two- dimensional work. Implied line is the path that the viewers eye takes as it follows shapes, colors, and form along a path, but may not be continuous or physically connected, such as the line created by a dancers arms, torso, and legs when performing an arabesque.
  3. 3. EXAMPLES OF LINES HORIZONTAL LINES – parallel to the ground - means to be at restVERTICAL LINES – move straight up - means dignity and strength
  4. 4. EXAMPLES OF LINES DIAGONAL LINES – lines that are leaning - means uncomfortable CURVED LINES – lines that seem to change directions. - means graceful
  5. 5. EXAMPLES OF LINES Zigzag Lines – combination of diagonal lines - means action, excitement, confusion
  6. 6. TEXTURE Surface quality of an object The texture is the quality of a surface or the way any work of art is represented. Lines and shading can be used to create different textures as well. For example, if one is portraying certain fabrics, one needs to give the feeling of the right texture so that it closely resembles what the artist is trying to convey. It can be implied or real. What you can feel with your sense of touch.
  7. 7. KINDS OF TEXTURES TACTILE TEXTURES – real textures, you can touch and feel
  8. 8. KINDS OF TEXTURES ARTIFICIAL TEXTURES – human-made surface quality
  9. 9. KINDS OF TEXTURES Visual Textures – revoked by a photograph or picture depicting an object *HILLS OF NIKKO BY JOSE JOYA THIS PAINTING SHOWS A VISUAL TEXTURE*
  10. 10. FORM Refers to an object with three dimension ( height, width and depth ) Form may be created by the forming of two or more shapes or as three-dimensional shape (cube, pyramid, sphere, cylinder, etc.). It may be enhanced by tone, texture and color. Form is considered three-dimensional showing height, width and depth. Examples of these are sculpture, theatre play and figurines.
  11. 11. EXAMPLES OF FORM KAGANAPAN BY ABUEVA
  12. 12. EXAMPLES OF FORM Escaping Criticism by Pere Borrel del Caso
  13. 13. SPACE Refers to the distance or area within the objects Space is the area provided for a particular purpose.Space includes the background, foreground andmiddle ground. Space refers to the distances or areasaround, between or within components of a piece.There are two types of space: positive and negativespace. Positive space refers to the space of a shaperepresenting the subject matter. Negative spacerefers to the space around and between the subjectmatter. Space is also defined as the distance betweenidentifiable points or planes in a work of art.
  14. 14. HILLS OF NIKKO BY JOSE JOYA THIS PAINTING SHOWS AN ARTWORKS WITH POSTIVE AND NEGATIVE SPACE
  15. 15. COLOR Derived from reflected light Color pertains to the use of hue in artwork and design. Defined as primary colors (red, yellow, blue) which cannot be mixed in pigment from other hues, secondary colors (green, orange, violet) which are directly mixed from combinations of primary colors. Further combinations of primary and secondary colors create tertiary (and more) hues. Tint and Shade are references to adding variations in Value; other tertiary colors are derived by mixing either a primary or secondary color with a neutral color.
  16. 16. PRIMARY COLORS Primary colors are sets of colors that can be combined to make a useful range of colors. For human applications, three primary colors are usually used, since human color vision is trichromatic. YELLOW RED BLUE
  17. 17. SECONDARY COLORS A secondary color is a color made by mixing two primary colors in a given color space.
  18. 18. COLOR HAS THREE PROPERTIES Hue – is the color’s name Value – is the property of color concerned with the lightness of darkness of a hue Intensity – is the brightness or dullness of a color
  19. 19. COMPLEMENTARY COLORSColors opposite to eachother on the color wheelRed and Green arecomplementary colors
  20. 20. MONOCHROMATIC COLOR SCHEMEHarmony of one color and its variations or different values of a single color.A color scheme using dark blue, medium blue, light blue are monochromatic
  21. 21. ANALOGOUS COLORSColors that are sideby side on the colorwheel and share ahue.
  22. 22. SHAPES Two – dimensional figure enclosed by a line. Shape pertains to the use of areas in two dimensional space that can be defined by edges, setting one flat specific space apart from another. Shapes can be geometric (e.g.: square, circle, triangle, hexagon, etc.) or organic (such as the shape of a puddle, blob, leaf, boomerang, etc.) Shapes are defined by other elements of art: Space, Line, Texture, Value, Color, Form.
  23. 23. GEOMETRIC SHAPES SQUARE, CIRCLE, TRIANGLE RECTANGLE, OVAL Precise shapes
  24. 24. ORGANIC SHAPES These are not regular or not even shapes
  25. 25. THANKSFORLISTENINGAND FOR YOURTIME!!!
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