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Countywide Transit Network Study: Introductory Public Meeting
 

Countywide Transit Network Study: Introductory Public Meeting

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Countywide Transit Network Study: Introductory Public Meeting

Countywide Transit Network Study: Introductory Public Meeting

Setting the Stage, Mapping your Future

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    Countywide Transit Network Study: Introductory Public Meeting Countywide Transit Network Study: Introductory Public Meeting Presentation Transcript

    • Introductory Public Meeting - Setting the stage - Mapping your futureMonday, July 16 Thursday, July 19Fairfax County Government Center Hayfield High SchoolRooms 9 and 10 Middle School Cafeteria12000 Government Center Parkway 7630 Telegraph RoadFairfax, VA 22035 Alexandria, VA 22315
    • Tonight’s meeting purpose - Present scope/schedule - Discuss goals and objectives: “Setting the Stage” - Consider preliminary network concepts: “Mapping Your Future” Tonight’s meeting format - Presentation - Open house - Facilitated conversations - Online survey - Comment cards2
    • Study purpose: Establish most effective way to serve the County’s needs to accommodate planned growth over the long term by improving public transit usage.3
    • Study objectives: • Establish a connected rapid transit system to meet demands through the year 2050 • Define transit corridor functions, station locations, modes and rights-of-way to guide subsequent comprehensive plan amendments and development review processes that protect needed right-of-way for ultimate transit network • Coordinate with other regional, state, and local jurisdictional plans • Identify policies, programs, and actions to support phased implementation and expedite delivery of priority elements in the near term4
    • Study process: • Develop functional plan for transit system • Conduct travel demand forecasting and assess implementation feasibility • Solicit input from partner agencies/jurisdictions, the public, and elected/appointed officials5
    • Study process: • Develop functional plan for transit system • Conduct travel demand forecasting and assess implementation feasibility • Solicit input from partner agencies/jurisdictions, the public, and Metrorail elected/appointed officials6
    • Study process: • Develop functional plan for transit system • Conduct travel demand forecasting and assess implementation feasibility • Solicit input from partner agencies/jurisdictions, the public, and Commuter rail elected/appointed officials7
    • Study process: • Develop functional plan for transit system • Conduct travel demand forecasting and assess implementation feasibility • Solicit input from partner agencies/jurisdictions, Metrobus the public, and Local Bus elected/appointed officials8
    • Study process: • Develop functional plan for premium transit system • Conduct travel demand forecasting and assess implementation feasibility • Solicit input from partner agencies/jurisdictions, Transit system the public, and elected/appointed officials9
    • Study schedule: • Goals and objectives (spring 2012) • Public input milestones • Goals and objectives (summer 2012) • Initial concepts (fall 2012) • Refined concepts (winter 2013) • Recommended concepts (spring 2013) • Board endorsement of study recommendations, with subsequent comprehensive plan amendments as warranted10
    • The Countywide Transit Network Study phases arescheduled to facilitate coordination with other regionaltransportation studies
    • The Countywide Transit Network Study will plan for a futurebeyond the 2040 Constrained Long Range Plan horizon District of Columbia 1. Anacostia Streetcar Project Phases I and II, 2012 2. H St. NE/Benning Rd. NE Streetcar Project, 2012, 2015 3. K St. NW Transitway, 2018 4. TIGER Grant Bus Priority Improvements (not mapped: DC, MD, VA) Maryland 5. Corridor Cities Transitway, from Shady Grove to COMSAT, 2020 6. I-270/US 15 Corridor, Shady Grove to I-70, HOV lanes, 2030 7. Purple Line, Bethesda to New Carrollton, 2020 Virginia 8. Cherryhill VRE Station and 3rd Track, 2012 9. Crystal City Busway in Arlington, and Potomac Yard Busway/ Street Car in Alexandria, 2013, 2018 10. Dulles Corridor Metrorail, 2013, 2016 11. Fairfax County Parkway HOV, widen and upgrade, 6 to 8 lanes, 2035 12. Franconia/Springfield Parkway HOV, 2020, 2025 13. I-495 High Occupancy/Toll (HOT) lanes and new bus service, 2013, 2030 14. I-66 HOV, widen to 8 lanes with interchange reconstruction at US 15, 2020 15. I-66, construct HOV ramps to access Vienna Metro Station, 2014 16. I-95/395 HOT Lanes, widen, construct 2, 3 lanes and new bus service, 2012 17. Potomac Yard Metro Station, 2017 18. US-1 bus right turn lanes, 2035 19. VA 244 Columbia Pk. Streetcar from Skyline to Pentagon City, 2016 NOTES: HOV = High-Occupancy Vehicle HOT = High-Occupancy/Toll Source: Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments
    • An interconnected transit system will help Fairfax County: Connect people and places affordably using multiple transit modes that attract choice riders Grow efficiently by promoting mixed- use development in designated centers Thrive by helping residents access places to work, play, and shop in an environmentally friendly manner13
    • 14
    • The region’s most developed activity centers have more jobs (red) than housing (blue)15
    • The region’s projected growth is both upwards and outwards16
    • Fairfax County Future Development Concept17
    • Most of the County’s growth potential lies within these established activity centers Housing units: Commercial space: Existing: 19% in centers Existing: 82% in centers Growth: 83% in centers Growth: 99% in centers Total: 36% in centers Total: 89% in centers18
    • Fairfax County’s land use policies encourage development within designated activity centers, which currently include about: • 10% of County acreage • 19% of County households • 82% of County jobs19
    • Fairfax County’s land use policies encourage development within designated activity centers, which currently include about: • 10% of County acreage • 19% of County households • 82% of County jobs Activity Density = (population+jobs)/acre Blue: (AD>4): supports local bus service Red: (AD>20) supports bus rapid transit (BRT) Purple: (AD>50) supports rail transit20
    • Fairfax County’s land use policies encourage development within designated activity centers, which by 2050 include about: • 10% of County acreage • 36% of County households • 89% of County jobs Activity Density = (population+jobs)/acre Blue: (AD>4): supports local bus service Red: (AD>20) supports bus rapid transit (BRT) Purple: (AD>50) supports rail transit21
    • Fairfax County’s land use policies encourage development within designated activity centers, which by 2050 include about: • 10% of County acreage • 36% of County households • 89% of County jobs How can the County’s EPTCs best be organized into a network to serve these centers? Activity Density = (population+jobs)/acre Blue: (AD>4): supports local bus service Red: (AD>20) supports bus rapid transit (BRT) Purple: (AD>50) supports rail transit22
    • What does transit supportive density look like? Huntington: 15 units/acre Activity Density = (population+jobs)/acre Blue: (AD>4): supports local bus service Red: (AD>20) supports bus rapid transit (BRT) Purple: (AD>50) supports rail transit23
    • What does transit supportive density look like? Fairfax Center: 20 units/acre Activity Density = (population+jobs)/acre Blue: (AD>4): supports local bus service Red: (AD>20) supports bus rapid transit (BRT) Purple: (AD>50) supports rail transit24
    • What does transit supportive density look like? Merrifield: 35 units/acre Activity Density = (population+jobs)/acre Blue: (AD>4): supports local bus service Red: (AD>20) supports bus rapid transit (BRT) Purple: (AD>50) supports rail transit25
    • About 70% of the County’s residential growth through 2040 will be in multifamily housing units.26
    • Fairfax County’s transportation plan identifies eight Enhanced Public Transportation Corridors (EPTCs). How should they connect? What functions should they perform? Might other corridors be needed to complete the network?27
    • Currently, transit service is oriented primarily toward serving jobs in Washington DC and the inner suburbs of Arlington and Alexandria. About 830,000 people start a transit trip in the inner core on a typical weekday afternoon. Most (57%) transit trips stay in the inner core.28
    • Currently, transit service to jobs in Fairfax County is relatively limited in comparison. About 46,000 people start a transit trip on a typical weekday afternoon in Fairfax County. About half (51%) stay within the County.29
    • In 2040, Fairfax will be more of a jobs center with greater transit access to housing both within and beyond the County boundaries. Under current plans, about 136,000 people will take a transit trip starting in Fairfax County, and 59% will stay within the County.30
    • Travel to, from, and within Fairfax County comprises many overlapping travel patterns. One study objective is to determine how to most effectively establish premium transit corridors to help serve these 2040 PM desire lines demands.31
    • Initial review suggests that a more robust network of high quality transit corridors will be valuable to serve both current (white) and future (purple) demand for person-trips. High quality transit service will be important to attract patrons traveling to/from, within, and beyond Fairfax County. These maps show what one potential study network might look like. What opportunities for connections do you see?32
    • The type of premium transit service appropriate for each corridor will reflect the traveler needs and land use context in that corridor. Destination corridors, like the Orange Line in Arlington, connect neighborhoods to multiple activity centers. Commuter corridors, like Virginia Railway Express, primarily serve one major activity center and tend to focus on journey-to-work trips. District circulators, like the planned Tysons Corner Circulator, enhance mobility within an activity center or Source: Center for Transit Oriented Development group of adjacent centers.33
    • Your feedback is valuable to us! “Setting the Stage” helps us identify and refine study objectives through the online survey and comments on the draft goals and measures Survey available tonight or online until August 10: http://www.fairfaxcounty.gov/fcdot/2050transitstudy.34
    • Your feedback is valuable to us! “Setting the Stage” helps us identify and refine study objectives through the online survey and comments on the draft goals and measures35
    • Your feedback is valuable to us! “Mapping Your Future” helps us identify connections that should be considered for premium commuter, connector, or destination transit corridors36
    • Next steps: • Refine goals and objectives • Identify potential networks • Conduct travel demand analysis • Evaluate alignment feasibility • Summarize initial findings • Engage with public37
    • Thomas Burke (Fairfax County DOT)thomas.burke@fairfaxcounty.gov703-877-5600Dan Hardy (Renaissance Planning Group)dhardy@citiesthatwork.com703-776-9922 x502http://www.fairfaxcounty.gov/fcdot/2050transitstudy/