Building and energy in the sustainable city
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Building and energy in the sustainable city

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Building and energy in the sustainable city Building and energy in the sustainable city Presentation Transcript

  • ENERGY and BUILDINGS • 50 % of the world’s fossil fuel consumption is directly related to the servicing and use of buildings. • Energy is used to make building materials, to transport them to the site, and in their erection as part of the building. The servicing
  • ENERGY and BUILDINGS • Designers, developers and users of buildings – through the careful choice of evironmentally friendly materials, the use of an ecological design approach, and sensible care and use of the building – could educe considerably the quantities of pollutants entering the environment (Birkeland, 2002). Photo credit:wikipedia
  • ENERGY and BUILDINGS • energy-sensitive building designs must begin from an understanding of the building’s ‘carbon footprint’. Photo credit:arlnow
  • Carbon footprint definiton • the overall amount of carbon dioxide (CO2) and other greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions (e.g. methane, laughing gas, etc.) associated with a product , along its supply-chain and sometimes including from use and end-of-life recovery and disposal.(European Commission – Joint Research Centre Institute for Environment and Sustainability) Photo credit:timbernetau
  • Components of the Carbon footprint in Building 1. The environmental capital intrinsic in the construction (the energy and resources expended in the manufacture and transportation of the materials, the energy required to prepare and service the site, and then construct the building) Photo credit:srmibiz
  • Components of the Carbon footprint in Building 2. The energy footprint extends to include the energy used to sustain and maintain the development and its daily service requirements once it is occupied. • This energy which Vale and Vale (1991) call ‘revenue energy’, may be as much as three times the energy used in construction, the ‘capital energy’. Photo credit:thenbs
  • Components of the Carbon footprint in Building 3. The energy that the occupants expend in moving between the building and the rest of the city, together with the energy required to feed the occupants. 4. The energy required to demolish the development and clean the site once it has reached the end of its useful life. Photo credit:libncsu
  • The construction’s ‘energy footprint : BUILDING MATERIALS • In choosing a building material the first consideration is the amount of energy used in its manufacture. • ‘As a rough guide, however, the energy intensiveness of a building material will act as a guide to its greenness’ (Vale and Vale, 1991). Photo credit:inspirasibangsa
  • The construction’s ‘energy footprint : BUILDING MATERIALS • Building materials can be classified into three broad groups according to energy content: low, medium and high Photo credit:colourbox
  • The construction’s ‘energy footprint : BUILDING MATERIALS • The energy content of materials shown in Table measured in kilowatt-hours per kilogram Energy content of materials (Vale and Vale, 1991)
  • The construction’s ‘energy footprint : BUILDING MATERIALS • The weights of each building material must be known if the designer is to estimate the total energy content of the completed construction Energy content of materials (Vale and Vale, 1991)
  • • Table shows the estimated energy content of three building types, which appears to signify that smallscale traditional domestic type buildings are by far the least energyintensive structure. • This might imply that the more traditional scale of built form is more appropriate for the sustainable city. The construction’s ‘energy footprint : BUILDING MATERIALS
  • The construction’s ‘energy footprint : BUILDING MATERIALS • The energy content of a building material is connected with the nature of the process of refinement. Photo credit:molemy
  • The construction’s ‘energy footprint : BUILDING MATERIALS • For example, the energy content of earth, mud or clay is zero, while in its burnt form as bricks the figure is 0.4kWh/kg • In general, the low-energy materials tend to be the least polluting as less energy has been used in their manufacture. Photo credit:batubatamerah
  • The construction’s ‘energy footprint : BUILDING MATERIALS • To achieve the sustainable structures, lowenergy materials should be used in preference to those of high energy content. Photo credit:marketingid
  • Organizations for Green Architecture Certification
  • • The World Green Building Council is a network of national green building councils in more than ninety countries, making it the world’s largest international organisation influencing the green building marketplace. • 97 members
  • The construction’s ‘energy footprint : BUILDING MATERIALS TRANSPORTATION • Another consideration in the selection of green building materials is the energy expended in their transportation to the place of manufacture and from there to the building site by using local building material. Photo credit:wolvesden
  • The construction’s ‘energy footprint : BUILDING and TRANSPORTATION • Buildings should be located on public transport routes and with close connections to other parts of the urban structure to reduce cardependency community. Photo credit:Sendai City Transportation Bureau
  • Photo credit:marketingpilgrim
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