Naace conference 2014 - The teacher role in the blended classroom
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Naace conference 2014 - The teacher role in the blended classroom

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Get ideas and inspiration on how teachers can utilise the combination of physical- and online learning spaces and the intersection between them. ...

Get ideas and inspiration on how teachers can utilise the combination of physical- and online learning spaces and the intersection between them.

More than ten years has passed since the university professors Heather Kanuka and Randy Garrison at University of Calgary defined blended learning as the thoughtful integration of classroom face-to-face learning experiences with online learning experiences. It is still my favourite definition of blended learning as it emphasises the aspect of thoughtfulness.

But how can a ‘thoughtful blended learning’ design look like?

The breakout session introduce the concept and give some proactical examples of how a teacher at Kibworth primary school utilises the benefits of the blended classroom while teaching persuasive writing and literacy.

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  • ATSA - AffinityTeaching School Alliance David Walton - Teacher at Kibworth Church of England Primary School http://www.kibprimary.leics.sch.uk/ 11 yearoldpupilsBreakout session at NAACE conference – http://www.naace.co.uk/events/conference2014/breakoutsessions/thursdayTeacher role in the blended classroom, or when 1 + 1 is bigger than 2
  • I hear from time to another people argue school classrooms have not changed from the old black and white photos that we see from schools in the 1950s. But while the basic set-up of the classroom remains the same – with students facing the teacher – teachers and students now have access to technology that gives them the opportunity to explore new teaching and learning possibilities.
  • It is obvious that the pupil and teacher role is quite different in these two classrooms.The most important difference is however not easy to spot if you just put your head into a modern classroom.
  • Teachers and pupils have today online learning spaces in addition to the physical spaces.
  • Kanuka, Heater og Garrison, Randy D. (2004): «Blended learning: Uncovering its transformative potential in higher education», University of Calgary Blended learning describedBlended learning is both simple and complex. At its simplest, blended learning is the thoughtfulintegration of classroom face-to-face learning experiences with online learning experiences. There isconsiderable intuitive appeal to the concept of integrating the strengths of synchronous (face-to-face) andasynchronous (text-based Internet) learning activities. At the same time, there is considerable complexityin its implementation with the challenge of virtually limitless design possibilities and applicability to somany contexts.To begin, it is important to distinguish blended learning from other forms of learning that incorporateonline opportunities. First, blended learning is distinguished from that of enhanced classroom or fullyonline learning experiences (seeFig. 1). However, it is not clear as to how much, or how little, onlinelearning is inherent to blended learning. In fact, this is only a rough, indirect measure that may bemisleading. The real test of blended learning is the effective integration of the two main components(face-to-face and Internet technology) such that we are not just adding on to the existing dominantapproach or method. This holds true whether it be a face-to-face or a fully Internet-based learningexperience. A blended learning design represents a significant departure from either of these approaches.It represents a fundamental reconceptualization and reorganization of the teaching and learning dynamic,starting with various specific contextual needs and contingencies (e.g., discipline, developmental level,and resources). In this respect, no two blended learning designs are identical. This introduces the greatcomplexity of blended learning.
  • These are two of many means schools and teachers have.The title of the presentation occurred when I was on a school visit and followed a teacher through a week. The teacher used two classrooms and utilised the properties of the two rooms at a very good way.
  • The unified classroom gives you a chance to extend activities long after classes have finished, so you can stretch time and re-engage your students in the work that they have done in class. In the same way, the unified classroom can be an important tool if you want to pre-teach before a class or course begins.Unified classrooms can also be used to give on-going feedback to students. Students can hand in work online and receive comments and advice before the next class, for example. They can see your comments on online discussions and blogs between classes. In addition, unified classrooms provide the opportunity for students to think about their answers before responding, enabling shy participants to join online discussions that they might not have joined in brick-and-mortar classrooms.
  • The Classroom Experiment A damaging classroom habit Handshttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cp5E6e14oEM
  • What can happen if these concepts are integrated?
  • But how can this be done, and how can it look like? I visited a primary school inKibworth, England to find out.
  • The classroom had one computer with an interactive witeboard.The teacher could also book the computerlab.
  • The teacher start the lesson by reminding the pupils of what they did last time.
  • The task was to find the main points in a text written by the teacher + suggest topic or points for the next paragraph

Naace conference 2014 - The teacher role in the blended classroom Naace conference 2014 - The teacher role in the blended classroom Presentation Transcript

  • Morten Fahlvik Educational Reseracher twitter.com/Fahlvik The teacher role in the blended classroom … or when 1 + 1 is bigger than 2
  • Agenda Part 1: Blended learning Part 2: The Unified classroom / Blended Classroom Part 3: Two Blended learning scenarios at Kibworth Primary
  • Blended learning “Blended learning is both simple and complex. At its simplest, blended learning is the thoughtful integration of classroom face-to-face learning experiences with online learning experiences. “ Kanuka, Heater og Garrison, Randy D. (2004) «Blended learning: Uncovering its transformative potential in higher education», University of Calgary
  • When 1 + 1 is bigger than 2 Physical classroom Online classroom
  • What are the best qualities of the physical classroom? What are the best qualities of the online classroom?
  • The unified classroom
  • c Key challenge in the classroom BBC – The Classroom Experiment
  • How can teaching in the unified classroom help Sid?
  • Dylan Wiliam: Involve more students …. and give students time to think and reflect
  • What can happen if these concepts are blended together?
  • Blended learning at Kibworth Primary
  • At school: Classroom and computer lab
  • Scenario1: Persuasive writing
  • Whole class Small Group Individual students Teacher introduce pursuasive writing. Students wrote a paragraph at home + posted comments and thoughts in online discussion Teacher comments the online discussions in class Students discuss in groups Teacher and students discuss in class The teaching design Etc… Etc…
  • Class discussion based on online forum
  • “What is the main point in the text?”
  • Taking notes on mini whiteboards
  • Identifying main points for next paragraph
  • Working with the second paragraph
  • Individual work with teacher support
  • Self assessment
  • Summary - pupil work flow 1) First paragraph written during last lesson and part of homework 4 and 5) Second and third paragraph written during lesson 2) Peer feedback in class. What Went Well EBI (even better if) 3) Features of persuasive texts given by the teacher 6) Self assessment
  • Scenario 2: Literacy and spelling
  • What should the teachers in your school / schools do? How can you or the teachers in your school / schools utilise the unified classroom?
  • http://www.itslearning.eu/whitepapers
  • Morten Fahlvik Education Research Manager www.twitter.com/fahlvik Morten.Fahlvik@itslearning.com