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Walking & Talking: Promoting Physical Activity through Texting
Walking & Talking: Promoting Physical Activity through Texting
Walking & Talking: Promoting Physical Activity through Texting
Walking & Talking: Promoting Physical Activity through Texting
Walking & Talking: Promoting Physical Activity through Texting
Walking & Talking: Promoting Physical Activity through Texting
Walking & Talking: Promoting Physical Activity through Texting
Walking & Talking: Promoting Physical Activity through Texting
Walking & Talking: Promoting Physical Activity through Texting
Walking & Talking: Promoting Physical Activity through Texting
Walking & Talking: Promoting Physical Activity through Texting
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Walking & Talking: Promoting Physical Activity through Texting

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  • 1. Walking & Talking: Promoting Physical Activity through Texting Presented by Rosemary Ehlers habits.stanford.edu
  • 2. How to Change Behavior <ul><li>Fogg Behavior Model: </li></ul><ul><li>A person needs motivation , ability , and a trigger in order to perform the desired action. </li></ul>habits.stanford.edu
  • 3. Triggers <ul><li>A trigger is the event or situation that prompts the user to act. </li></ul>Trigger Types: External: a note on a calendar, an alarm clock ringing Internal: hunger, a sudden idea habits.stanford.edu
  • 4. Triggers <ul><ul><ul><li>Successful triggers are noticeable , are associated with the target behavior , and occurs when the user is both motivated and able to perform the target action </li></ul></ul></ul>Unsuccessful triggers lead to irritation (not enough motivation) or frustration (low ability), and create negative associations with the target behavior habits.stanford.edu
  • 5. Persuasive Systems Design <ul><li>Proposed by Kristian Torning and Harri Oinas-Kukkonen </li></ul>habits.stanford.edu
  • 6. Persuasive Systems Design <ul><li>Design Principles: </li></ul><ul><li>Primary Task Support </li></ul><ul><li>Dialogue Support </li></ul><ul><li>System Credibility Support </li></ul><ul><li>Social Support </li></ul>
  • 7. Why are cellphones so great? <ul><li>Pervasive &amp; Mobile </li></ul>But fragmented. Number of cellphone subscriptions in US 1985-2004 habits.stanford.edu
  • 8. Why is texting so great? <ul><li>Universal </li></ul><ul><li>Simple </li></ul><ul><li>Interactive </li></ul>Reaches younger demographics habits.stanford.edu
  • 9. How can texting help people exercise? <ul><li>Sending information – education, notification </li></ul><ul><li>Gathering information – collecting data, individual journaling </li></ul><ul><li>Getting answers – from a database, or a person </li></ul><ul><li>Connecting people – both individuals and groups </li></ul><ul><li>(Future use) Transactions – setting appointments, buying health items </li></ul>habits.stanford.edu
  • 10. Other factors in promoting exercise <ul><li>Structural factors: </li></ul><ul><li>Safety </li></ul><ul><li>Aesthetics </li></ul><ul><li>Destinations </li></ul>habits.stanford.edu
  • 11. Conclusion <ul><li>Behavior Change Methods </li></ul><ul><li>+ </li></ul><ul><li>Mass Communication </li></ul><ul><li>= </li></ul><ul><li>Real Change </li></ul>habits.stanford.edu

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