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OpEx Business Process Improvement Training Module
OpEx Business Process Improvement Training Module
OpEx Business Process Improvement Training Module
OpEx Business Process Improvement Training Module
OpEx Business Process Improvement Training Module
OpEx Business Process Improvement Training Module
OpEx Business Process Improvement Training Module
OpEx Business Process Improvement Training Module
OpEx Business Process Improvement Training Module
OpEx Business Process Improvement Training Module
OpEx Business Process Improvement Training Module
OpEx Business Process Improvement Training Module
OpEx Business Process Improvement Training Module
OpEx Business Process Improvement Training Module
OpEx Business Process Improvement Training Module
OpEx Business Process Improvement Training Module
OpEx Business Process Improvement Training Module
OpEx Business Process Improvement Training Module
OpEx Business Process Improvement Training Module
OpEx Business Process Improvement Training Module
OpEx Business Process Improvement Training Module
OpEx Business Process Improvement Training Module
OpEx Business Process Improvement Training Module
OpEx Business Process Improvement Training Module
OpEx Business Process Improvement Training Module
OpEx Business Process Improvement Training Module
OpEx Business Process Improvement Training Module
OpEx Business Process Improvement Training Module
OpEx Business Process Improvement Training Module
OpEx Business Process Improvement Training Module
OpEx Business Process Improvement Training Module
OpEx Business Process Improvement Training Module
OpEx Business Process Improvement Training Module
OpEx Business Process Improvement Training Module
OpEx Business Process Improvement Training Module
OpEx Business Process Improvement Training Module
OpEx Business Process Improvement Training Module
OpEx Business Process Improvement Training Module
OpEx Business Process Improvement Training Module
OpEx Business Process Improvement Training Module
OpEx Business Process Improvement Training Module
OpEx Business Process Improvement Training Module
OpEx Business Process Improvement Training Module
OpEx Business Process Improvement Training Module
OpEx Business Process Improvement Training Module
OpEx Business Process Improvement Training Module
OpEx Business Process Improvement Training Module
OpEx Business Process Improvement Training Module
OpEx Business Process Improvement Training Module
OpEx Business Process Improvement Training Module
OpEx Business Process Improvement Training Module
OpEx Business Process Improvement Training Module
OpEx Business Process Improvement Training Module
OpEx Business Process Improvement Training Module
OpEx Business Process Improvement Training Module
OpEx Business Process Improvement Training Module
OpEx Business Process Improvement Training Module
OpEx Business Process Improvement Training Module
OpEx Business Process Improvement Training Module
OpEx Business Process Improvement Training Module
OpEx Business Process Improvement Training Module
OpEx Business Process Improvement Training Module
OpEx Business Process Improvement Training Module
OpEx Business Process Improvement Training Module
OpEx Business Process Improvement Training Module
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OpEx Business Process Improvement Training Module

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The Operational Excellence Business Process Improvement (BPI 7) Training Module v2.0 includes: …

The Operational Excellence Business Process Improvement (BPI 7) Training Module v2.0 includes:

1. MS PowerPoint Presentation including 128 slides covering our seven-steps Business Process Improvement Methodology.

This is a partial view only. Please, visit our website www.oec-us.com to review the complete presentation and supporting templates.

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  • 1. 1 This is a partial view only. Please, visit our website www.oec-us.com to review the complete presentation. 11/3/2011 – v2.0 Operational Excellence – Business Process Improvement by Operational Excellence Consulting LLC
  • 2. 2 This is a partial view only. Please, visit our website www.oec-us.com to review the complete presentation. 11/3/2011 – v2.0 A process or value stream is a series of related activities which together produce an output of value to the customer. Process or Value Stream - A Definition
  • 3. 4 This is a partial view only. Please, visit our website www.oec-us.com to review the complete presentation. 11/3/2011 – v2.0 Process-Driven Organizational Structure  The Focus is on the Customer Management Process Customer Requirements = INPUTS Customer Satisfaction = OUTPUTS F U N C T I O N 1 F U N C T I O N 2 F U N C T I O N 5 F U N C T I O N 6 F U N C T I O N 3 F U N C T I O N 4
  • 4. 6 This is a partial view only. Please, visit our website www.oec-us.com to review the complete presentation. 11/3/2011 – v2.0 Process-Driven Organization - Make the Process Visible Function A Function B Function C Input Output B6B5 A1 A3 B4 B3 B2B1 A2 C1 C2 C3 A4 5. Cross-functional teams are working together and mapping the functional activities and tasks, as well as the interaction points. 6. The different functions start to understand each others input requirements, begin to see the overall process flow, and identify initial improvement opportunities.
  • 5. 8 This is a partial view only. Please, visit our website www.oec-us.com to review the complete presentation. 11/3/2011 – v2.0 Business Process Improvements (BPI 7) – Table of Content The main objective of the workshop is to help you improve the business by:  Defining the Scope of a Process  Mapping the Process  Defining Process Measures  Setting Process Targets  Analyzing the Process  Improving the Process  Managing the Process 3. Define Measures 2. Map Process 1. Define Process
  • 6. 10 This is a partial view only. Please, visit our website www.oec-us.com to review the complete presentation. 11/3/2011 – v2.0 Business Process Improvement - Management Involvement Business process improvement teams need process owner and management sponsor involvement at at least 5 stages of the BPI 7 Process.  When starting the BPI 7 Process (Step 1)  To gain commitment and ensure resources for process improvement  After the initial process capture (Step 4)  To agree on key performance indicators and targets  After selecting the areas for improvements (Step 5)  To agree the changes to the process (What)  When creating the improvement plans (Step 6)  To agree to and own the improvement plan(s) (How)  When following up on process performance (Step 7)  To ensure continuous improvement as needed
  • 7. 12 This is a partial view only. Please, visit our website www.oec-us.com to review the complete presentation. 11/3/2011 – v2.0 Business Process Improvement - Objectives By the end of this module, you should be able to:  define the purpose of the process  define its start and end points (scope the process)  identify the customers of the process  identify the output(s) of the process  identify the supplier(s) of the process  identify the input(s) of the process
  • 8. 14 This is a partial view only. Please, visit our website www.oec-us.com to review the complete presentation. 11/3/2011 – v2.0 Business Process Improvement – Step 1: Define Process  State the name of the process  State the purpose of the process  Identify a process owner / management sponsor  Scope your process by identifying your starting point and end point  Identify the customer(s) for the process  Identify the output of what you do in the process  Define the requirements of the output  Identify your supplier(s)  Identify the input for the process  Agree your requirements for the input
  • 9. 16 This is a partial view only. Please, visit our website www.oec-us.com to review the complete presentation. 11/3/2011 – v2.0 Group Work #1: Business Process Improvement - 1. Step The Task:  define the current process On a Flip Chart share:  your reasons for scope  your view of the process purpose  any learning points  any concerns as to how to apply this step of the method in practice? 20 Minutes
  • 10. 18 This is a partial view only. Please, visit our website www.oec-us.com to review the complete presentation. 11/3/2011 – v2.0 Business Process Improvement - 1. Step Summary  Defining the scope, as well as the input and output requirements of a process, is important to ensure a firm foundation for process improvement  This module has provided you with a standard template for doing this  The need to brief and involve the process owner / management sponsor at an early stage
  • 11. 20 This is a partial view only. Please, visit our website www.oec-us.com to review the complete presentation. 11/3/2011 – v2.0 Business Process Improvement - Objectives  To explain the reasons behind ‘process mapping’  To show the link between a process map and a process scope  To introduce the elements and symbols of a process map  To provide guidelines how to map a process  To give you experience in producing your own process map
  • 12. 22 This is a partial view only. Please, visit our website www.oec-us.com to review the complete presentation. 11/3/2011 – v2.0 Basic Elements of a Process Map Main Flow of Process:  Activities: the steps completed in the process  Decision: poses a question and signals either an alternative path or an inspection point  Connector: Company internal or external connector to another process  Object Flow: the inputs and outputs which flow from one activity to another
  • 13. 24 This is a partial view only. Please, visit our website www.oec-us.com to review the complete presentation. 11/3/2011 – v2.0 Additional Process Mapping Symbols Additional Elements : Delay Multi-Path Document Database Inventory Off-Page Connector
  • 14. 26 This is a partial view only. Please, visit our website www.oec-us.com to review the complete presentation. 11/3/2011 – v2.0 Process Role & Responsibilities  Roles can be defined as  name of the role (warehouse manager, purchasing, …)  type of the role (A, R, C, I)  The four types of roles are:  A - Authority for the decision  R - Responsible for action  C - Collaborator in development  I - Informed about progress in the process step
  • 15. 28 This is a partial view only. Please, visit our website www.oec-us.com to review the complete presentation. 11/3/2011 – v2.0 Preparation for the Process Mapping  Become familiar with all existing and relevant process documentation  Interview all associates who participate in the process  Interview a sample of associates who perform the same activities or tasks to fully understand what is really occurring in the process  Compare the way different people do the same job to determine what the best standard of operation should be  Following completion check map with the people who provided input
  • 16. 30 This is a partial view only. Please, visit our website www.oec-us.com to review the complete presentation. 11/3/2011 – v2.0 Process Hierarchy - Example Training 1. Select interviewers 2. Schedule Interviews 3. Book rooms etc. An Activity : ‘Arrange First Interviews’ Each process can be broken down into another level of detail AppraisalInductionRecruit A People Management Process
  • 17. 32 This is a partial view only. Please, visit our website www.oec-us.com to review the complete presentation. 11/3/2011 – v2.0 Process Activity Template - SIPOC Process: Production Line Implementation Responsibility: Plant Activity: Investment Proposal Creation Authority: Engineering Inputs Supplier Activities Collabora tors Outputs Delivery Equipment list Global Eng. Creating investment proposal Investment proposal General Name of the (sub)process, which this activity belongs to. Name of this activity. Inputs, which are needed to execute the activity. Suppliers for the inputs. Detailed activities. Outputs, which are required from a successful activity. Resources, whose support and participation is needed to successfully execute the activity. Addressees for the outputs. Resource, who is responsible for the execution of whole activity. Resource, who has authority to accept the result. Global Eng. Mgr.
  • 18. 34 This is a partial view only. Please, visit our website www.oec-us.com to review the complete presentation. 11/3/2011 – v2.0 Business Process Improvement - 2. Step Summary  In order to identify how we are doing things so that we can improve, it is important to visualize the steps  Visualizing what we do makes it easier for people to learn and understand  Process mapping provides us with the raw-material required for process management  If we don’t write down what we do it is impossible to systematically analyze and improve  We have provided guidelines on how to map a process
  • 19. 36 This is a partial view only. Please, visit our website www.oec-us.com to review the complete presentation. 11/3/2011 – v2.0 Continuous Process Improvement Methodology 3. Define Measures 2. Map Process 1. Define Process A Method to Achieve Operational Excellence Step 3: DEFINE MEASURE
  • 20. 38 This is a partial view only. Please, visit our website www.oec-us.com to review the complete presentation. 11/3/2011 – v2.0 Why do you need Measures ? Measures are a basis for improvement:  Measures allow you to set clear goals and monitor trends  Measures show how effectively you use resources  They provide the input data for identifying sources and analyzing root causes of errors, allowing you to identify opportunities for improvement  Measures direct people’s attention: ......... what gets measured gets done.
  • 21. 40 This is a partial view only. Please, visit our website www.oec-us.com to review the complete presentation. 11/3/2011 – v2.0 How Measures are Often Collected  Easy = often provides poor information  Nice = adjusted to provide good results  Right = difficult to get and often shows poor performance e.g. Number of calls = easy Customer opinion = difficult ... and may not be favorable !!!
  • 22. 42 This is a partial view only. Please, visit our website www.oec-us.com to review the complete presentation. 11/3/2011 – v2.0 Measures and Process Hierarchy  Just as your process fits into a wider process at a higher level, your measures should fit into a higher level of measures also  Measures of your process should be seen as part of the process hierarchy  For example  the costs of your travel impact upon  the costs of your process impact upon  the profitability of your business unit impact upon  the financial excellence of company
  • 23. 44 This is a partial view only. Please, visit our website www.oec-us.com to review the complete presentation. 11/3/2011 – v2.0 Where to Place Measures - An Example Organization CUSTOMER PRODUCT DELIVERY PROCESS Product Delivery ORDER FULFILLMENT PROCESS “Customer satisfaction in terms of delivery on time” “Shipments planned vs. actual” “Incoming component quality” Material
  • 24. 46 This is a partial view only. Please, visit our website www.oec-us.com to review the complete presentation. 11/3/2011 – v2.0 Group Work #3: Business Process Improvement - 3. Step 20 Minutes The Task:  indicate on you process map where you would place your measures On Flip Chart share:  the requirements of one of your measures as defined by the template  any learning points  any concerns as to how to apply this step of the method in practice
  • 25. 48 This is a partial view only. Please, visit our website www.oec-us.com to review the complete presentation. 11/3/2011 – v2.0 3. Define Measures 2. Map Process 1. Define Process Continuous Process Improvement Methodology A Method to Achieve Operational Excellence Step 4: SET TARGETS
  • 26. 50 This is a partial view only. Please, visit our website www.oec-us.com to review the complete presentation. 11/3/2011 – v2.0 Target Setting Definitions  The actual performance of the measure = the current level of performance  e.g. 75% of deliveries are made on time  Performance standard* = what our level of performance should be  e.g. 100% of deliveries are made on time  Target* = how much should be achieved by when  e.g. 90% of deliveries made on time by 31st December  *These should be agreed with the process owner / management sponsor based on customer requirements, business requirements, feasibility, internal or external benchmarking, … .
  • 27. 52 This is a partial view only. Please, visit our website www.oec-us.com to review the complete presentation. 11/3/2011 – v2.0 Group Work #4: Business Process Improvement - 4. Step 30 Minutes The Task:  identify targets for your measures On Flip Chart share:  the actual, standard and target you have set for the measure defined at stage 4  any learning points  any concerns as to how to apply this step of the method in practice
  • 28. 54 This is a partial view only. Please, visit our website www.oec-us.com to review the complete presentation. 11/3/2011 – v2.0 Business Process Improvement - 4. Step Summary  Target setting is an integral part of management - targets drive the improvement activities!  Targets prevent us from wishing and hoping and help move us towards action  Targets can inspire others  Targets should reflect customer priorities as well as business plans
  • 29. 56 This is a partial view only. Please, visit our website www.oec-us.com to review the complete presentation. 11/3/2011 – v2.0  Review why process analysis is essential before improving the process  Understand areas for process analysis  Use analysis to challenge the current way the process operates  Select most valuable areas for improvement  Introduce some basic tools for process analysis and improvement selection Business Process Improvement - Objectives
  • 30. 58 This is a partial view only. Please, visit our website www.oec-us.com to review the complete presentation. 11/3/2011 – v2.0 The Process Model To get results, should we focus our behavior on the Y or X’s ? Y = f (X’s)  X1, X2, ..., XN  Input-Process  Independent  Cause  Control  Y  Output  Dependent  Effect  Monitor 
  • 31. 60 This is a partial view only. Please, visit our website www.oec-us.com to review the complete presentation. 11/3/2011 – v2.0 Process Issues - Part 1  Analyze process performance in terms of measures  time - can the process be done quicker?  cost - how well are the resources used?  quality - how well are requirements met?  customer satisfaction - how well are outputs satisfying the customer?  Gain understanding of interfaces (inputs & outputs) to other processes to assess the impact of improvement
  • 32. 62 This is a partial view only. Please, visit our website www.oec-us.com to review the complete presentation. 11/3/2011 – v2.0 People Issues  Do people have adequate skills/competencies to perform the activities?  What level of personnel development would be required to improve performance?  Does individual performance targets fit with the process performance targets?  e.g. does sales targets fit with customer satisfaction targets?  Could fewer resources be used to perform the activities - what are the implications?  Roles - do people understand their contribution to the overall process?  Are responsibilities clearly defined?  Are all functions really need to perform the process effectively?
  • 33. 64 This is a partial view only. Please, visit our website www.oec-us.com to review the complete presentation. 11/3/2011 – v2.0 Tools for Process Analysis  Process Walkthrough  Activity Assessment Review (see attached worksheet)  Value-add vs. Non-value-add Activities  Brainstorming  Why-Why Analysis  Cause-and-Effect or Ishikawa Diagram  Affinity Diagram  Interrelationship Diagram  Mistake Proofing & Poka-Yoke  Double Team & Multi-Voting  Impact – Effort Matrix  Solution Selection Table  …
  • 34. 66 This is a partial view only. Please, visit our website www.oec-us.com to review the complete presentation. 11/3/2011 – v2.0 Process Walkthrough  Hang your process maps on the wall  Start from the start point of the process  Go through each activity in turn to see if:  the sequence of activities is logical  activities can be reassigned to gain greater efficiency  there are any duplications  activities can be done earlier if at all  all the roles are necessary  systems are relevant for the process  Challenge hard any rework Angelica LA Market GRF Order Management Process – Part I “e-GRF and ABS Work Order Creation” ServiceCustomerCRM/TM ServiceCenter Administration Stockroom Page 1 Cx requests Item Cx contacts RSR & RSR creates GRF Draft Cx contacts CRM & CRM creates GRF Approved e-GRF forwarded to SC Administration Cx contacts Service Department Route Supervisor or Service Manager creates e-GRF e-GRF sent to Cx for Approval Cx returns approved e-GRF Approved e-GRF forwarded to SC Administration Review e-GRF and perform Account Maintenance / Creation as needed. Create ABS Work Order with e-GRF Request Date and WO Creation Date Add ABS Work Order # to e-GRF, return updated e- GRF to Originator and forward for internal processing. Receive new ABS Work Order e-GRF sent to Cx for Approval
  • 35. 68 This is a partial view only. Please, visit our website www.oec-us.com to review the complete presentation. 11/3/2011 – v2.0 Why - Why Analysis  Challenge the current way the process operates by asking the question “why” about each activity:  Why perform the current activity?  Why perform it in the current manner or order?  Why does it need to be performed by this function?  Why does it cost so much to perform the activity?  Why does it take so long to perform the activity?  Why can be not automate the activity?  …
  • 36. 70 This is a partial view only. Please, visit our website www.oec-us.com to review the complete presentation. 11/3/2011 – v2.0 Brainstorming Brainstorming is used to generate a large number of ideas in a short period of time.  Step 1: Review the topic or problem to be discussed. Make sure the entire team understands the subject of the brainstorm. Clarify if you are looking for potential root causes or possible solutions.  Step 2: Allow a couple of minutes for everyone to think about the task and write down some ideas.  Step 3: Invite the team members to call out their ideas, randomly or in turns around the table. Make sure that the team builds upon each others ideas (1 + 1 = 3), but do not allow discussions or evaluations.  Step 4: Record all ideas, e.g. on post-its, and stick them on a flip chart visible to everyone.  Step 5: Continue with Step 3 and 4 until several minutes silence produces no more.
  • 37. 72 This is a partial view only. Please, visit our website www.oec-us.com to review the complete presentation. 11/3/2011 – v2.0 How to use the Cause-and-Effect Diagram  Decide/define the Effect or Gap to be analyzed  Draw a horizontal line (the backbone of the fish) and to the right end of this write the effect (= fish’s head)  Brainstorm for all possible causes  Group the causes under main headings (min. 2, max. 6)  Put the main headings at the end of the major “side” bones  Add other causes to smaller “off shoots” from the major bones  Check that the diagram is complete and logical
  • 38. 74 This is a partial view only. Please, visit our website www.oec-us.com to review the complete presentation. 11/3/2011 – v2.0 How to use the Why - Why diagram Step 1: Write the problem/GAP statement down on paper and present it to other team members. Remember that it is the effect that needs to be analyzed - make sure it is clearly defined and understood. Step 2: Ask "Why ?" this problem does or could occur. List all these causes on notes and place them in a column immediately to the right of the problem statement. Step 3: Each of the cause statements now become a new problem statement. Again ask "Why ?". Sometimes the question needs to be phrased, "Why does this situation causes the problem?". Create another column of cause statements. Show the relationships to the first column with arrows. Step 4: Continue to turn each causes into a problem and ask "Why ?". Do not stop until you reach an answer that is fundamental and actionable (procedure, system, communication, training needs, and so forth).
  • 39. 76 This is a partial view only. Please, visit our website www.oec-us.com to review the complete presentation. 11/3/2011 – v2.0 Interrelationships Diagram The interrelationship diagram is used when the relationships among the effects and the causes, or the objectives and the methods, are complex and involved. Step 1: Place all ideas in a circle on a flip chart. Step 2: For each idea, ask “Does this idea cause or influence any other idea?”. Draw arrows from each idea to the ones it causes or influences. Step 3: Analyze the diagram by counting how many arrows in and out each idea has. Note the number of incoming and outgoing arrows for each idea “in/out”. Step 4: Note which ideas have primarily outgoing arrows. These are the basic causes that need to be addressed to resolve the problem statement. 3/3 5/0 2/1 5/1 0/5 1/3 2/2 0/5 3/1 Rejection of the Statistical Thinking Method Lack of motivation to change Lack of support for implementation Lack of consensus around the right measurement indices Data are not easily accessible Misunderstanding of Statistical Thinking Paradigm Lack of Statistical Thinking Paradigm Fear of technical tools and methods People have competing priorities
  • 40. 78 This is a partial view only. Please, visit our website www.oec-us.com to review the complete presentation. 11/3/2011 – v2.0 Mistake-Proofing - Five Mistake-Proofing Methods Variation Control  Use of special jigs, fixtures, or assembly tools that reduce the variation of how parts are assembled. Workplace Organization  Error prevention by proper organization of the workplace or work station; implementation of a 5S Visual Workplace Program. Identification  Errors are prevented by use of clearly written and easily available materials, procedures, and tools. Process Checks  Performance of specific in-process checks to prevent errors. Poka - Yoke Devices  Ensures errors cannot become defects by automatically detecting error conditions and immediately rejecting the part or shutting down the process. Poka-Yoke devices work best when a specific step must be taken to re-start the process once a defect has been detected.
  • 41. 80 This is a partial view only. Please, visit our website www.oec-us.com to review the complete presentation. 11/3/2011 – v2.0 Solution Selection - Double Team Decision Making 3 - 5 Suggestions 3 - 5 Suggestions Board Three Suggestions from the 1. Double Team Three Suggestions from the 2. Double Team 3 - 5 Suggestions 3 - 5 Suggestions 1 2 3 4 5 6 |||| || |||| | |||| | ||| Selection of the 2-3 most voted solutions 5 3 1
  • 42. 82 This is a partial view only. Please, visit our website www.oec-us.com to review the complete presentation. 11/3/2011 – v2.0 IMPACT EFFORT High Medium Low HighMediumLow These opportunities are usually good candidates for the 1st Phase These opportunities are usually good candidates for the 2nd Phase These opportunities may require additional analysis to see if they are worthwhile QuickHits–JustDoIt Impact – Effort Matrix
  • 43. 84 This is a partial view only. Please, visit our website www.oec-us.com to review the complete presentation. 11/3/2011 – v2.0 Group Work #5: Business Process Improvement - 5. Step 30 Minutes The Task:  analyze your process using two or three specific tools  identify and select 2-3 major improvement opportunities for your process On Flip Chart share:  your improvement opportunities  any learning points  any concerns as to how to apply this step of the method in practice?
  • 44. 86 This is a partial view only. Please, visit our website www.oec-us.com to review the complete presentation. 11/3/2011 – v2.0 Business Process Improvement - 5. Step Summary Process Analysis allows us to  challenge the current way the process operates  gain the knowledge required to consider any improvement  select the most beneficial improvement options Three areas of process analysis are  process issues (activities)  people issues  technology issues A large set of tools, techniques and software can be used to support process analysis.
  • 45. 88 This is a partial view only. Please, visit our website www.oec-us.com to review the complete presentation. 11/3/2011 – v2.0 Let’s have a Break
  • 46. 90 This is a partial view only. Please, visit our website www.oec-us.com to review the complete presentation. 11/3/2011 – v2.0 Continuous Process Improvement Methodology 3. Define Measures 2. Map Process 1. Define Process A Method to Achieve Operational Excellence Step 6: IMPROVE PROCESS
  • 47. 92 This is a partial view only. Please, visit our website www.oec-us.com to review the complete presentation. 11/3/2011 – v2.0 Change Management  Improving processes is very likely to affect the way people work by  changing the process flow  eliminating non-value-adding activities  People tend to resist change because of the fear of  unclear future  having to learn new things  Therefore, it is important to plan for change.
  • 48. 94 This is a partial view only. Please, visit our website www.oec-us.com to review the complete presentation. 11/3/2011 – v2.0 The Cycle of Change Outward looking Inward looking Future opportunities Past problems Denial Resistance Exploration Commitment People in the denial stage are trying to avoid dealing with the fear and uncertainty of prospective change. They are hoping they won't have to adapt. When people can no longer deny that something is or has happened, they tend to move into a state of anger, accompanied by covert and/or over resistance. This is the stage where people have stopped denying, and while they may be somewhat angry, the anger has moved out of the spotlight. They have a better understanding of the meaning of the change and are more willing to explore further, and to accept the change. This is the payoff stage, where people commit to the change, and are willing to work towards making it succeed. They know it is a reality, and at this point people have adapted sufficiently to make it work.
  • 49. 96 This is a partial view only. Please, visit our website www.oec-us.com to review the complete presentation. 11/3/2011 – v2.0 The Change Sheet •PLAN •DO •CHECK •ACT •REVIEW A tool to help teams plan and implement the selected improvements
  • 50. 98 This is a partial view only. Please, visit our website www.oec-us.com to review the complete presentation. 11/3/2011 – v2.0 Planning for Improvement Section 1 THE REQUIRED CHANGE  Single change objective  Why the change?  Expected benefits  Key policies Section 2 THE FUTURE SCENE  ‘Look and feel’ when successfully implemented 1 - 4
  • 51. 100 This is a partial view only. Please, visit our website www.oec-us.com to review the complete presentation. 11/3/2011 – v2.0 Plan Section 5 PLANNING THE CHANGE THE PLAN  Tasks and deliverables  Responsibilities  Outline timescales RISKS related to …  Time  Cost  Quality  Process  People 5
  • 52. 102 This is a partial view only. Please, visit our website www.oec-us.com to review the complete presentation. 11/3/2011 – v2.0 Check Section 7 THE RESULTS OF THE CHANGE  Did the awareness and testing come out as planned?  Check the results against measures of success  Revisit previous sections in the change sheet  New actions? 7
  • 53. 104 This is a partial view only. Please, visit our website www.oec-us.com to review the complete presentation. 11/3/2011 – v2.0 Review Section 9 THE IMPACT OF THE CHANGE  Was the implementation of improvements successful and effective?  Were the benefits gained?  What lessons did you learn?  What recommendations would you make for future improvement projects? 9
  • 54. 106 This is a partial view only. Please, visit our website www.oec-us.com to review the complete presentation. 11/3/2011 – v2.0 Dealing with Problems The Ten Point Recovery Plan (2/2)  Seek Alternative Sources  When a supplier cannot deliver within budget, schedule and quality specifications  Accept Partial Delivery  If the full amount can be delivered at a later stage  Offer Incentives  For meeting time, cost and quality requirements if the going gets tough  Escalate  Put a case to senior management if the blockages become too severe  Renegotiate/change the project requirements  Discuss with the client the possibility of increasing the budget, extending the deadline or relaxing some other requirement
  • 55. 108 This is a partial view only. Please, visit our website www.oec-us.com to review the complete presentation. 11/3/2011 – v2.0 Force Field Analysis  Step 1: Define your current situation.  Step 2: Define where you want to be, what you want to achieve and/or what the situation would be like if there was not the problem you are trying to solve.  Step 3: Identify the forces -[either helping - (positive) or hindering - (negative)] you see on your way from the current situation to the future state.  Record only existing forces, not planned  Step 4: Identify the relative strength of the helping and the hindering forces.  Step 5: Identify your action areas to help you use the forces around you.
  • 56. 110 This is a partial view only. Please, visit our website www.oec-us.com to review the complete presentation. 11/3/2011 – v2.0 Action Planning  Divide solution(s) into actions.  Assign responsibilities.  Create a schedule. Measure: Time Quality Cost Time (25% improvement) Quality (50% reduction in expenses of quality failures) Cost (20% productivity improvement) WHO? WHEN? WHAT?
  • 57. 112 This is a partial view only. Please, visit our website www.oec-us.com to review the complete presentation. 11/3/2011 – v2.0 Improvement Objective: Team Identification: Team Members: Process Owner: Date Updated: Next Review: Action Items Item Owner Schedule and Milestones (Plan vs. Actual) Performance Target ActualMMYR MMYR MMYR MMYR MMYR MMYR MMYR MMYR MMYR MMYR MMYR MMYR Comments or observations: Implementation Plan Template
  • 58. 114 This is a partial view only. Please, visit our website www.oec-us.com to review the complete presentation. 11/3/2011 – v2.0 Business Process Improvement - 6. Step Management Review  Owner/sponsor commitment is particularly important at this phase, since improving a process is likely to  change the way the process operates  have on impact on people’s work  have an impact on other processes  Make sure that the process owner/management sponsor fully agrees to the improvement plans
  • 59. 116 This is a partial view only. Please, visit our website www.oec-us.com to review the complete presentation. 11/3/2011 – v2.0 3. Define Measures 2. Map Process 1. Define Process Continuous Process Improvement Methodology A Method to Achieve Operational Excellence Step 7: MANAGE PROCESS
  • 60. 118 This is a partial view only. Please, visit our website www.oec-us.com to review the complete presentation. 11/3/2011 – v2.0 BPI 7 and Continuous Improvement  BPI 7 is a continuous process improvement methodology  BPI 7 does not stop after completing the first round of the BPI 7 cycle  To ensure that BPI 7 continues to be an effective improvement tool, BPI 7 teams should:  identify the points of conflict with other teams and resolve them  identify which management teams should support the review of process performance  identify any other barriers to ongoing improvement
  • 61. 120 This is a partial view only. Please, visit our website www.oec-us.com to review the complete presentation. 11/3/2011 – v2.0 Checklist for Managing BPI 7 Ensure you have:  Process Name  Process Owner / Management Sponsor  Process Performance Measures Managed by:  ‘XYZ Team - whose members are  Who meet every .....  And use the following performance data.....’
  • 62. 122 This is a partial view only. Please, visit our website www.oec-us.com to review the complete presentation. 11/3/2011 – v2.0 Considerations at Management Team Meetings  What issues are there that are effecting performance of the process?  Is the process meeting its Time, Cost, Quality and Customer Satisfaction targets?  What action do we need to make sure that the process meets its targets?  Do we need to revise our targets?  How are our improvement plans progressing?  What support do we need to provide to process teams?
  • 63. 124 This is a partial view only. Please, visit our website www.oec-us.com to review the complete presentation. 11/3/2011 – v2.0 Group Work #8: Business Process Improvement - 7. Step 20 Minutes The Task:  complete the Manage Process worksheet On Flip Chart share:  any learning points  any concerns as to how to apply this step of the method in practice?
  • 64. 126 This is a partial view only. Please, visit our website www.oec-us.com to review the complete presentation. 11/3/2011 – v2.0 REMEMBER … The FIRST STEP is always the HARDEST.
  • 65. 127 This is a partial view only. Please, visit our website www.oec-us.com to review the complete presentation. 11/3/2011 – v2.0 Business Process Improvement The End … “Perfection is not attainable, but if we chase perfection we can catch excellence.” - Vince Lombardi

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