The future of the library catalogue

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Will there be a library catalogue in the future and, if so, what will it look like? …

Will there be a library catalogue in the future and, if so, what will it look like?

In the last 25 years, the library catalogue has undergone an evolution, from card catalogues to OPACs, discovery systems and even linked data applications making library bibliographic data accessible on the web. At the same time, users expectations of what catalogues will be able to offer in the way of discovery have never been higher.

This groundbreaking edited collection brings together some of the foremost international cataloguing practitioners and thought leaders, including Lorcan Dempsey, Emmanuelle Bermès, Marshall Breeding and Karen Calhoun, to provide an overview of the current state of the art of the library catalogue and look ahead to see what the library catalogue might become.

Practical projects and cutting edge concepts are showcased in discussions of linked data and the Semantic Web, user expectations and needs, bibliographic control, the FRBRization of the catalogue, innovations in search and retrieval, next-generation discovery products and mobile catalogues.

Table of contents: Foreword - Marshall Breeding Introduction - Sally Chambers 1. Next generation catalogues: what do users think? - Anne Christensen 2. Making search work for the library user - Till Kinstler 3. Next-generation discovery: an overview of the European Scene - Marshall Breeding 4. The mobile library catalogue - Lukas Koster and Driek Heesakkers 5. FRBRizing your catalogue - Rosemie Callewaert 6. Enabling your catalogue for the semantic web - Emmanuelle Bermes 7. Supporting digital scholarship: bibliographic control, library co-operatives and open access repositories - Karen Calhoun 8. Thirteen ways of look at the libraries, discovery and the catalogue: scale, workflow, attention - Lorcan Dempsey.

Readership: Cataloguers and metadata specialists, library adminstrtorts and managers responsible for planning and strategy, systems librarians, user services managers, electronic resources librarians, and digital library project managers, students on cataloguing, information management and digital library courses.

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  • 1. Catalogue 2.0 The future of the library catalogue
  • 2. What is it? A new edited collection that brings together leading international cataloguing practitioners & thought leaders to provide an overview of the current state of the art of the library catalogue & to look ahead at what it might become.
  • 3. Who is it for? Cataloguers, metadata specialists, library administrators and managers, systems librarians, user services managers, electronic resources librarians, digital library project managers, and LIS students.
  • 4. What is in it? Discussions of linked data and the semantic web, user expectations and needs, bibliographic control, the FRBRization of the catalogue, innovations in search and retrieval, next-gen discovery products and mobile catalogues.
  • 5. Who is in it? Sally Chambers - DARIAH-EU Emmanuel Bermes - Centre Pompidou Marshall Breeding Karen Calhoun - University of Pittsburgh Rosemie Callewaert Anne Christensen - Leuphana University Lorcan Dempsey - OCLC Silvia Gestrein - University of Innsbruck Driek Heesakkers - University of Amsterdam Till Kinstler - GBV Verbindzentrale Lukas Koster - University of Amsterdam
  • 6. What is in it? Discussions of linked data and the semantic web, user expectations and needs, bibliographic control, the FRBRization of the catalogue, innovations in search and retrieval, next-gen discovery products and mobile catalogues.
  • 7. What to expect chapter-by-chapter
  • 8. 1. Next-generation catalogues: what do users think? Anne Christensen This chapter looks at the history of user studies on online catalogues, investigates methods to involve users actively in the design and development processes for new catalogues and describes and examines the outcomes of studies of users’ perceptions.
  • 9. 2. Making search work for the library user Till Kinstler This chapter describes how Boolean search (the key information retrieval paradigm in library catalogues), differs from the Vector Space Model (used in many search engines). The chapter then explores how such search engine technologies can be applied to library catalogues and explores how other features of search engines (e.g search suggestions) can be implemented within a library context.
  • 10. 3. Next-generation discovery: an overview of the European scene Marshall Breeding Dissatisfaction with the online catalogues delivered as part of the LMS sparked a new genre of products & services that focus on providing an improved experience in the way libraries provide access to their collections & services. This chapter provides an overview of the features & characteristics of this new genre of library software e.g. products from Serials Solutions, EBSCO, Ex Libris & OCLC.
  • 11. 4. The mobile library catalogue Lukas Koster & Driek Heesakkers This chapter explores the range of mobile applications available and provides an overview of mobile platforms. It then explores the user needs of the target audience from a range of libraries and looks at the different types of mobile library services. A case study of the implementation of a mobile catalogue at the University of Amsterdam follows before the chapter concludes with a ten-point checklist outlining the steps to set up a mobile catalogue.
  • 12. 5. FRBRizing your catalogue: the facets of FRBR Rosemie Callewaert Using the Flemish public library web portal, zoeken.bibliotheek.be, as a case study, this chapter explores how the theory behind FRBR has been applied in practice. Attention is paid to the user experience & how the theoretical concepts of FRBR can be presented in a practical way for the enduser. The technology is also described & the shortcomings of FRBR in this particular case are also explored.
  • 13. 6. Enabling your catalogue for the Semantic Web Emmanuelle Bermès This chapter provides a short introduction to the Semantic Web and its practical implementation, Linked Data. It explores the reasons why a library would want to enable its catalogue for the Semantic Web and the different steps that would need to be taken. An introduction to the technology is provided along with some examples of ongoing and existing Semantic Web projects in the library domain.
  • 14. 7. Supporting digital scholarship: bibliographic control, library co- operatives and open access repositories Karen Calhoun This chapter examines bibliographic control, cooperative cataloguing systems and library catalogues in the context of changing library collections, new metadata sources and methods, open access repositories, digital scholarship and the purposes of research libraries. The chapter concludes with a call for research libraries to consider collectively new approaches that could strengthen their roles as essential contributors to emergent, network-level scholarly research infrastructures.
  • 15. 8. 13 ways of looking at libraries, discovery & the catalogue: scale, workflow, attention Lorcan Dempsey This chapter outlines how the catalogue is changing & becoming a part of a larger discovery environment. National libraries are reviewing how catalogue data is created & how it might participate in a broader web of data. There is growing interest in using catalogue and usage data to help drive decisions about collections and also in placing catalogue data & services in other environments, where it can act as a switch back to library resources. This renewed interest in the catalogue is emerging at the same time as the catalogue itself is becoming less central as an individual destination.
  • 16. If you want to order the book...
  • 17. THE BOOK IS OUT NOW! You can click here to order the book from the Facet Publishing website. Customers in the USA and Canada can click here to order from the ALA. You can browse a free sample chapter of the book by clicking here.