• Like
Reflecting on the future of academic and public libraries
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

Reflecting on the future of academic and public libraries

  • 2,704 views
Published

This is a preview of Reflecting on the Future of Academic and Public Libraries, edited by Peter Hernon and Jospeh R Matthews. …

This is a preview of Reflecting on the Future of Academic and Public Libraries, edited by Peter Hernon and Jospeh R Matthews.

Academic and public libraries are much different today than they were even 15 years ago. And with even bigger changes on the horizon, what lies in store? In this systematic attempt to speak to academic and public librarians about the future of library services, Hernon and Matthews invite a raft of contributors to step back and envision the type of future library that will generate excitement and enthusiasm among users and stakeholders.

Anyone interested in the future of libraries, especially library managers, will be engaged and stimulated as the contributors: Examine the current state of the library, summarizing existing literature on the topic to sketch in historical background; Project into the future, using SWOT analysis, environmental scans, and other techniques to posit how library infrastructure (such as staff, collections, technology, and facilities) can adapt in the decades ahead; Construct potential scenarios that library leaders can use to forge paths for their own institutions.

The collection of knowledge and practical wisdom in this book will help academic and public libraries find ways to honour their missions while planning for the broader institutional changes already underway.

Readership: Library managers, academic and public librarians, LIS students and academics and anyone interested in the future of libraries.

April 2013; 224pp; paperback; 978-1-85604-948-1; £49.95

http://www.facetpublishing.co.uk/title.php?id=9481

Published in Education , Business
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
2,704
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
5

Actions

Shares
Downloads
26
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. REFLECTING ON THEE FUTUREOF ACADEMIC AND PUBLIC LIBRARIES
  • 2. Many libraries face serious problems stemming from the economic recession of 2009-2009 and its aftermath, as well as from the ever- changing information-seeking behaviour of their customers and the presence of information technologies that affect that behaviour. In some instances, fiscal problems predate the recession.
  • 3. At the same time, there is an increased expectation that libraries demonstrate accountability, collaborate more with stakeholders and other libraries, and, in some instances, generate alternative sources of revenue.
  • 4. How should libraries respond to such pressures?
  • 5. Is it enough to continue to do the same things or, at most, incremental changes?
  • 6. NO!
  • 7. On the contrary, the times call for dramatic transformational change and the creation of a vision of the future that excites staff and stakeholders.
  • 8. The mention of change management and the future of public, academic, or any other type of library suggests someone staring into a crystal ball or trying to predict the future.
  • 9. Source: flickr cc image by ChazWags
  • 10. The emerging vision, as commonly portrayed in the literature on scenario development, might assume hypothetical facts and extend the projection for thirty to fifty years, but without producing anything relevant to help libraries anticipate, prepare for, and manage change.
  • 11. Facet Publishing’s latest book, Reflecting on the Future of Academic and Public Libraries, does not offer predictions; rather it offers portrayals of the future through shorter-range scenarios, stories projected a maximum of fifteen years ahead.
  • 12. These scenarios contain elements or threads grounded in the present that libraries or other organizations can use as they piece together a story that is relevant to local circumstances and can be linked to strategic planning and change management.
  • 13. The goal is to help libraries produce a story that they can use to explore surprises and discontinuities in the planning process and to obtain staff and stakeholder buy-in to a vision that enables everyone to concentrate on the bigger picture.
  • 14. The goal is to help libraries produce a story that they can use to explore surprises and discontinuities in the planning process and to obtain staff and stakeholder buy-in to a vision that enables everyone to concentrate on the bigger picture.
  • 15. The chapters in the book are: 1. Change - major to minor 2. Building a path to the future 3. Transforming the future 4. Related literature 5. Future views of academic libraries 6. Perspective on trends and scenarios: academic libraries continues on the next slide...
  • 16. 7. Future views of public libraries 8. Perspectives on trends and scenarios: public libraries 9. Preparing for the future: some final thoughts.
  • 17. The scenarios presented in the book do not represent an absolute vision; rather, readers can pick and choose among elements in different scenarios and add their own elements.
  • 18. The scenarios also apply to the broader organization, and such scenarios merit review as library leaders settle on the preferred future.
  • 19. The goals of the book are to identify relevant literature and possible scenarios and to get readers to think about the future and what the library infrastructure (staff, collections, technology, and facilities) will resemble.
  • 20. Unlike other works, Reflecting on the Future of Academic and Public Libraries, offers scenarios for both academic and public libraries at a time when many library managers may be consumed by the present and how to cope with scarce or reduced resources.
  • 21. Peter Hernon and Joseph R Matthews, the editors of the book, believe that the present serves as an opportunity to create a new and positive future, as some libraries are doing.
  • 22. After all, are there not dangers in thinking solely in terms of the present?
  • 23. Reflecting on the Future of Academic and Public Libraries separates scenarios from scenario planning.
  • 24. This allows librarians to take any of the scenarios and apply scenario planning to explore a preferred future in more detail, factoring in local circumstances.
  • 25. Scenarios are intended to be used as a tool for leaders to use to generate discussion within the organization and with stakeholders as they prepare for a transformation that requires forming new partnerships, collaborating, staking out new services roles, and ensuring the workforce has the required skills, abilities and knowledge to cope with the change.
  • 26. As Joan Giesecke explains, “Libraries have a unique opportunity to begin to change how they interact with others in the higher education system because they are campus-wide entities that work with both the business and academic sides of the institution. Libraries can take a leadership role in bringing together different groups to explore possible partnerships.”
  • 27. Joan’s comments could apply to public libraries and to the achievement of any transformational vision that require relationship building to get others to accept, shape, and help to carry it out.
  • 28. Joan’s comments could apply to public libraries and to the achievement of any transformational vision that require relationship building to get others to accept, shape, and help to carry it out.
  • 29. Reflecting on the Future of Academic and Public Libraries alerts those who are preparing to enter the professional workforce of academic and public libraries about how libraries are changing, what they might look like, and the types of skills they will need to prosper in the new setting.
  • 30. Through their many years of teaching in schools of library and information science, the editors have found that many students have impressions of library work that do not match reality or take into account the forces of dramatic change.
  • 31. Library directors may be flattening the organizational structure, merging and eliminating departments, starting new services, and participating more broadly within their communities.
  • 32. The editors cite key literature to reflect the changes environment, and the scenarios presented in the book have been reviewed by several influential library directors.
  • 33. The book is also intended for managerial leaders and staff of academic and public libraries as they move beyond the issues of the moment to piece together their vision of the library of the future.
  • 34. The audience extends to include stakeholders with whom library managerial leaders deal, such as members of governing boards.
  • 35. None of these actors can afford to succumb to the idea that there is no longer any need for a library or that all resources are available on the internet.
  • 36. Instead, they need to invest more extensively in advocacy as they stake out a future that can be realistically achieved - and as they convert library spaces to new service roles.
  • 37. Instead, they need to invest more extensively in advocacy as they stake out a future that can be realistically achieved - and as they convert library spaces to new service roles.
  • 38. Click here to order the book from the Facet Publishing website Customers in the US and Canada can click here to order from the American Library Association Find out more information and purchase the book