Pull your students to the target language: Facebook for language learning
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Pull your students to the target language: Facebook for language learning

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Presentation at the 45th NeMLA Annual Convention, April 4, 2014, Harrisburg, PA

Presentation at the 45th NeMLA Annual Convention, April 4, 2014, Harrisburg, PA

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    Pull your students to the target language: Facebook for language learning Pull your students to the target language: Facebook for language learning Presentation Transcript

    • Pull Your Students to the Target Language: Facebook for Language Learning April 4, 2014 Technological Tools for Successful Teaching and Learning - Roundtable Fabrizio Fornara Florida State University
    • Social Networking Sites in Education • Web 2.0 technologies for language-learning: blogs, wikis, virtual worlds, podcasts, and social networking sites (SNS) (Wang & Vásquez, 2012). • Social networking sites: o student-student networks o social and collaborative learning o individual control o online and blended learning settings • Social networking sites enhance students’ o attitude (Antenos-Conforti, 2009) o engagement (Junco, Heibergert, & Loken, 2011) o performance (Shih, 2011) o autonomous learning (McBride, 2009)
    • Facebook in Education • Most popular SNS among American college students (Junco, Heibergert, & Loken, 2011) • Familiar, informal learning environment • Constant exposure to the target language • Desktop and mobile • Target language part of students' daily life • Interactions similar to class’ interactions (McBride, 2009)
    • • Student-instructor, student-student, and student- material interactions • Instructor: facilitator of information • Learners actively involved (Wang, Woo, Quek, Yang, & Liu, 2012) • Material: authentic, contextualized, retrievable from the Internet • Privacy: Users are not reciprocally connected, Facebook in Education (cont.)
    • Facebook Page
    • Facebook Page (cont.) • Students are not mutually connected • Students “like” the course page  personal account • New material posted  students’ news feed • Integrate other language learning activities • Graded activity  participation, not correctness • Daily new activities: Text, multimedia resources, questions • Two main sections: o Wall o Events
    • Wall - Home Page
    • Wall - Home Page (cont.)
    • Wall - Home Page (cont.)
    • Wall - Home Page (cont.)
    • Events
    • Events
    • Events
    • Events
    • Limits • Students may perceive the Facebook activities as an extra task in addition to the workload of the course • Students may be uncomfortable with using Facebook for class activities, not wanting to mix leisure activities and spaces with formal instruction • Instructors may have to obtain institutional approval to use Facebook in a formal learning setting
    • Questions? Thank you! @ffornara April 4, 2014 Technological Tools for Successful Teaching and Learning - Roundtable