Fontes de Receitas
Modelo de Negócio
Segmentos de Clientes
Propostas de Valor
Canais6
Fontes de Receitas
Fontes de Receitas• Quais os tipos de fontes dereceitas?• Quais os modelos depricing?• Quanto é que os clientesestão dispo...
Receitas Directas• Transacção• Utilização• Aluguer• Licenciamento• Subscrição• Pré-Pago• Freemium• Pay-per-use• Intermedia...
Transacção1.230.000 €
Utilização
Aluguer
Licenciamento
Subscrição
Subscrição
Subscrição$29 x 12 x 1000 = $358.000
Pré-Pago
Freemium
Freemium
Uns poucos suportam todos os outros
Produto grátis e serviços pagosServices
Produto grátis em troca de compensação nãomonetária
Receba um grátis, pague o outro
Suportado por Publicidade
Pay-per-use
Intermediação
Publicidade
Receitas Indirectas• Receitas de Referências• Receitas de Afiliados• Aluguer de Listas de Emails• Aluguer de Recursos Disp...
Receitas de Referências
Receitas de Afiliados
Programas de Afiliação(1 de 2)https://affiliate-program.amazon.com/
Programas de Afiliação(2 de 2)http://www.spreadshirt.com/
Aluguer de Listas de Emails
Aluguer de Recursos Disponíveis
B5 p1 fontes de receita
B5 p1 fontes de receita
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B5 p1 fontes de receita

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  • what are customers really willing to pay for? how? are you generating transactional or recurring revenues?Tipos de Fluxos de Rendimento: Venda, Taxa de Utilização, Assinaturas, Arrendamento, Licenciamento, Comissões, Publicidade, Freemium, etc.
  • A transaction based revenue model is the basic traditional revenue model for companies. It involves the customer paying a set fee for a transaction. There are a lot of variations available on this model and it is suited for commodity products or a completely customized service.One-time payment i.e. users buy a license to use e.g. Microsoft Office
  • The subscription business model is a business model where a customer must pay a subscription price to have access to the product/service. The model was pioneered by magazines and newspapers, but is now used by many businesses and websites.Rather than selling products individually, a subscription sells periodic (monthly or yearly or seasonal) use or access to a product or service, or, in the case of such non-profit organizations as opera companies or symphony orchestras, it sells tickets to the entire run of five to fifteen scheduled performances for an entire season. Thus, a one-time sale of a product can become a recurring sale and can build brand loyalty. It is used for anything where a user is tracked in both a subscribed and unsubscribed status.Membership fees to some types of organizations, such as trade unions, are also known as subscriptions.Industries that use this model include mail order book sales clubs and music sales clubs, cable television, satellite television providers with pay-TV channels, satellite radio, telephone companies, cell phone companies, internet providers, software providers, business solutions providers, financial services firms, fitness clubs, and pharmaceuticals, as well as the traditional newspapers, magazines and academic journals.Renewal of a subscription may be periodic and activated automatically, so that the cost of a new period is automatically paid for by a pre-authorized charge to a credit card or a checking account. In the U.S., recurring card charges must be disclosed in writing to the cardholder at least 10 days before each charge.[1]A common model on web sites, colloquially becoming known as the freemium model, is to provide content for free, but restrict access to premium features (for example, archives) to paying subscribers. It has also been described as ransomware. In this case, the subscriber-only content is said to be behind a paywall or - in a scholarly context - closed access, which alludes to the alternative model of open access. The razor and blades business model (also called the bait-and-hook model) is an attempt to approximate the subscription model, but without a formal agreement by both parties.
  • Subscription model i.e. users pay a per month/per year e.g. book libraries, dropbox and other online storage sites, SAAS platforms, etc.
  • “Freemium” model. In this variation on the free model, used by LinkedIn and many other Internet offerings, the basic services are free, but premium services are available for an additional fee. This also requires a huge investment to get to critical mass, and real work to differentiate and sell premium services to users locked-in as free. Rather than selling products individually, a subscription sells periodic (monthly or yearly or seasonal) use or access to a product or service, or, in the case of such non-profit organizations as opera companies or symphony orchestras, it sells tickets to the entire run of five to fifteen scheduled performances for an entire season. Thus, a one-time sale of a product can become a recurring sale and can build brand loyalty. It is used for anything where a user is tracked in both a subscribed and unsubscribed status.A common model on web sites, colloquially becoming known as the freemium model, is to provide content for free, but restrict access to premium features (for example, archives) to paying subscribers. It has also been described as ransomware. In this case, the subscriber-only content is said to be behind a paywall or - in a scholarly context - closed access, which alludes to the alternative model of open access.Freemium: Free for basic, paid for premium services. E.g. sugarsync.com, linkedin, gmail, etcThe “Freemium” model. Many software companies like LinkedIn and Dropbox offer a free, limited-functionality version of their product, hoping that some users will pay a premium for advanced features. The trick with this model is to offer just enough value in the free version so you attract (and hopefully lock in) regular users, and incrementally more value in the premium version so that you entice conversion and maximize cash flow. Your pricing must be a function of the incremental perceived value you offer: Can you convert 1,000 users at $100 per year? Or 10,000 users at $10 per year?
  • Product is free, but you pay for services. In this model, the product is given away for free and the customers are charged for installation, customization, training or other services. This is a good model for getting your foot in the door, but be aware that this is basically a services business with the product as a marketing cost. Distribute the product free but customers pay for services: In some markets telecom companies follow this model where they give away the telephone instrument for free, and people pay for the usage. In some cases, e.g. printers, the base product is not given free but is offered at a very low price, often lower than the cost price, with the hope of recovering it through sale of related products and services e.g. cartridges and printer servicing.Free product, bundled with paid services. This pricing model is common for open source software, such as Red Hat linux, where the product is available for free download, but customers pay subscription fees if they want support. Other companies can also charge for installation, maintenance, training, customization, and consulting services. This pricing model is essentially a service business that uses free software as a marketing tool. Note that most investors aren’t interested in service businesses; fortunately, service businesses are good at generating cash flow on their own.
  • Product or service is free, revenue from ads and critical mass. This is the most common model touted by Internet startups today, the so-called Facebook model, where the service is free, and the revenue comes from click-through advertising. It’s great for customers, but not for startups, unless you have deep pockets. If you have real guts, try the Twitter model of no revenue, counting on the critical mass value from millions of customers. Free for consumers – ad supported model: E.g. Angry BirdsGive it away for free, and make money on advertising. Most social apps, both web and mobile, including Facebook,Twitter, and Pinterest follow this model. It’s a very difficult model to follow successfully. Many publishers like The New York Times is putting most of their content behind a paywall because the ad dollars just aren’t there. It either takes a lot of luck (say, being a huge hit at SXSW) or deep pockets for a startup to achieve critical mass with this model. You also need to remember that the user IS your product, and you’re selling access to them to advertisers, who are your real customer.
  • Pay-per-use model i.e. users pay as they use it e.g. Platforms like Webex have a pay per use model
  • Firm or person (such as a broker or consultant) who acts as a mediator on a link between parties to a businessdeal, investment decision, negotiation, etc. In money markets, for example, banks act as intermediaries between depositors seeking interest income and borrowers seeking debt capital. Intermediaries usually specialize in specific areas, and serve as a conduit for market and other types of information. Also called a middleman. See also intermediation.Read more: http://www.businessdictionary.com/definition/intermediary.html#ixzz1vCn8FdvO
  • B5 p1 fontes de receita

    1. 1. Fontes de Receitas
    2. 2. Modelo de Negócio
    3. 3. Segmentos de Clientes
    4. 4. Propostas de Valor
    5. 5. Canais6
    6. 6. Fontes de Receitas
    7. 7. Fontes de Receitas• Quais os tipos de fontes dereceitas?• Quais os modelos depricing?• Quanto é que os clientesestão dispostos a pagar?• Qual o contributo de cadafluxo para o rendimentototal?
    8. 8. Receitas Directas• Transacção• Utilização• Aluguer• Licenciamento• Subscrição• Pré-Pago• Freemium• Pay-per-use• Intermediação• Publicidade
    9. 9. Transacção1.230.000 €
    10. 10. Utilização
    11. 11. Aluguer
    12. 12. Licenciamento
    13. 13. Subscrição
    14. 14. Subscrição
    15. 15. Subscrição$29 x 12 x 1000 = $358.000
    16. 16. Pré-Pago
    17. 17. Freemium
    18. 18. Freemium
    19. 19. Uns poucos suportam todos os outros
    20. 20. Produto grátis e serviços pagosServices
    21. 21. Produto grátis em troca de compensação nãomonetária
    22. 22. Receba um grátis, pague o outro
    23. 23. Suportado por Publicidade
    24. 24. Pay-per-use
    25. 25. Intermediação
    26. 26. Publicidade
    27. 27. Receitas Indirectas• Receitas de Referências• Receitas de Afiliados• Aluguer de Listas de Emails• Aluguer de Recursos Disponíveis
    28. 28. Receitas de Referências
    29. 29. Receitas de Afiliados
    30. 30. Programas de Afiliação(1 de 2)https://affiliate-program.amazon.com/
    31. 31. Programas de Afiliação(2 de 2)http://www.spreadshirt.com/
    32. 32. Aluguer de Listas de Emails
    33. 33. Aluguer de Recursos Disponíveis

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