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Catalogo de-servicios v040811

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  • © 2007 Pink Elephant Inc. All rights reserved. The ITIL ® Practitioner: Service Level Management and Financial Management course is designed to provide a detailed and practical view of the best practices within the ITIL library. Pink Elephant endeavors to enable the attendees to understand the basic concepts and terminology within the Library and also to be viewed as The ITIL Experts. It is Pink Elephant’s goal to not only show the attendees that we have a theoretical understanding, but also to leave attendees knowing that there is much more to ITIL than this course – and that it is Pink Elephant who can assist organizations in utilizing this framework at their respective organizations through additional training, consulting, or outsourcing services. This slide should be showing as attendees are entering the training room. Before you begin, you should know where the bathrooms and exits are in relation to the training room. Ensure that you are aware of any special needs for attendees (hearing, etc.). Speak to hotel staff or your in-house sponsor regarding details around lunch and breaks. Be aware of reception for cell phones and where public phones are or if they are not around.
  • © 2001 Pink Elephant Inc. All rights reserved.
  • © 2007 Pink Elephant Inc. All rights reserved. The ITIL ® Practitioner: Service Level Management and Financial Management course is designed to provide a detailed and practical view of the best practices within the ITIL library. Pink Elephant endeavors to enable the attendees to understand the basic concepts and terminology within the Library and also to be viewed as The ITIL Experts. It is Pink Elephant’s goal to not only show the attendees that we have a theoretical understanding, but also to leave attendees knowing that there is much more to ITIL than this course – and that it is Pink Elephant who can assist organizations in utilizing this framework at their respective organizations through additional training, consulting, or outsourcing services. This slide should be showing as attendees are entering the training room. Before you begin, you should know where the bathrooms and exits are in relation to the training room. Ensure that you are aware of any special needs for attendees (hearing, etc.). Speak to hotel staff or your in-house sponsor regarding details around lunch and breaks. Be aware of reception for cell phones and where public phones are or if they are not around.
  • Service Portafolio Describe los servicios en terminos de valor al negocio © 2007 Pink Elephant Inc. All rights reserved.
  • ITIL Configuration Management Practitioner © Pink Elephant Inc., 1998, version 3.0 Animation Diagram is present at the top 1 st click = Utility text box 2 nd click = Warranty text box
  • © 2007 Pink Elephant Inc. All rights reserved. This slide is a transition slide that takes us from the Business Perspective of IT to the Management Processes of IT. The following is the dialog that goes with the slide. ITIL looks at any organization as a “Business System” that interacts with its environment to provide products and services. This Business system is composed of many processes. ITIL categorizes these business processes under four categories. In order to understand the position of IT within the business system we need to look at these four categories and then look at how IT management processes relate to them. Click 1 “ Primary Business Processes” The Primary Business Processes are the processes the business must keep going in order to grow, profit or just exist, in the case of non-profit. For example if you are a car manufacturer you make cars and therefore your primary processes would be those business processes that must be working in order to ensure the production of cars. If you are an organization that is a job placement agency then your primary processes would be around the seeking out interviewing and permanent placement of people. There are inputs into these primary processes such as materials and data. Then the processes are carried out and the products or services of the organization are created. Click 2 “Business Support Processes” In order to keep the Primary Business Processes going there are also within the business system “Business Support Processes” some examples of these can be Finance Administration HR Click 3 “Corporate Or Management Processes” These are the process that are carried out by upper management to facilitate: Business Planning Gather and Analyze Business Information Measure Business process and performance Example balance score card, TQM Click 4 “Innovation, Development, Knowledge Transfer Processes” These are the processes that get established as the organization grows and matures to ensure that continuing communication and R&D are taking place and that transfer of knowledge to personnel so expertise is not lost is happening. Examples of these processes are : Communications over distance Marketing research Training Now all organizations have in existence to some degree these processes formally, documented controlled, or informally, in the minds and habits of the people. Then over a period of time this new thing came into being called IT and as the business began to leverage and utilize the capability of IT all of it’s processes have become dependant on IT and the Services IT offers the organization. Click 5 “ IT Management Processes” At first IT was the thing in the basement that the business really didn’t understand and they would throw money down the stairs and IT would come up with these wonderful things that enabled the business to function quicker, faster more accurately. However as the dependency on IT grew the requirements for IT to become less of a cowboy and more of a business partner has grown and this is why ITIL recommends that in order to support the business in an efficient and cost effective manner formalized IT Management Processes must be put into place. Click 6 “Business Customers” “IT Users” “Suppliers” Business Customers : In order to formalize our IT Management Processes we must recognize who our customers are within the business, where does the money come from, whose budget, or where does the authority come from to provide for an IT Service? In any organization there are typically multiple internal customers who have authority to subscribe or purchase products and services from their IT department ITIL recognizes these to be the Business customers. IT Users: These are the individual people who consume the IT services. It is important to identify them and what they do with these services. Suppliers: These are the external third party organizations that IT is dependant on in order to deliver our internal services. It is worth noting that there is no end to end service in any organization that does not have an external dependency of some kind. You must have toner, DAT tapes, power etc.. It is important to identify what these external dependencies are and how they facilitate our internal services Click 7 Transition “ IT Management Processes” (Zoomed) In the establishment of Service Management processes there are 5 steps that need to be considered: Click 8 “1. Align IT Capability With Business Strategy” Where is the business going? What does it need to enable it to reach it’s goals? What are we capable of providing and not providing in our current state? Click 9 “2 Plan IT Service Provision” Develop a strategy for IT to ensure that IT is able to an optimal contribution to the achievement of the business objectives. Click 10 “3. Meet Customer Service Needs” Establish a business interface with the business customers in order to facilitate the capability to define IT services that are mutually understood and agreed on that meet customer needs both present and future. Click 10 “Produce, Deliver & Support IT Services” Deliver and support IT services in order to meet defined and agreed requirements. Click 11 “Manage Underpinning services and products” To cost effectively mange the acquiring of products and services that provide best value for the money that enable and support our IT provision plan. All of the ITIL processes enable this high level view of IT management processes. As we are dealing with Service Level Management and Financial Management for IT Services you will see reflections of these 5 steps throughout the course. The assumption of ITIL is that you are trying to chive business and IT alignment.
  • © 2007 Pink Elephant Inc. All rights reserved. The ITIL ® Practitioner: Service Level Management and Financial Management course is designed to provide a detailed and practical view of the best practices within the ITIL library. Pink Elephant endeavors to enable the attendees to understand the basic concepts and terminology within the Library and also to be viewed as The ITIL Experts. It is Pink Elephant’s goal to not only show the attendees that we have a theoretical understanding, but also to leave attendees knowing that there is much more to ITIL than this course – and that it is Pink Elephant who can assist organizations in utilizing this framework at their respective organizations through additional training, consulting, or outsourcing services. This slide should be showing as attendees are entering the training room. Before you begin, you should know where the bathrooms and exits are in relation to the training room. Ensure that you are aware of any special needs for attendees (hearing, etc.). Speak to hotel staff or your in-house sponsor regarding details around lunch and breaks. Be aware of reception for cell phones and where public phones are or if they are not around.
  • ITIL Configuration Management Practitioner © Pink Elephant Inc., 1998, version 3.0
  • © 2007 Pink Elephant Inc. All rights reserved. The ITIL ® Practitioner: Service Level Management and Financial Management course is designed to provide a detailed and practical view of the best practices within the ITIL library. Pink Elephant endeavors to enable the attendees to understand the basic concepts and terminology within the Library and also to be viewed as The ITIL Experts. It is Pink Elephant’s goal to not only show the attendees that we have a theoretical understanding, but also to leave attendees knowing that there is much more to ITIL than this course – and that it is Pink Elephant who can assist organizations in utilizing this framework at their respective organizations through additional training, consulting, or outsourcing services. This slide should be showing as attendees are entering the training room. Before you begin, you should know where the bathrooms and exits are in relation to the training room. Ensure that you are aware of any special needs for attendees (hearing, etc.). Speak to hotel staff or your in-house sponsor regarding details around lunch and breaks. Be aware of reception for cell phones and where public phones are or if they are not around.
  • 1.5 Structure and scope of the ICT book Figure 1.5 of the ICT book presents the main ICTIM processes described in detail in the following chapters of this book. The relationships to each other and with Service Management and Application Management are also shown. The main ICTIM processes as shown in Figure 1.5 are: Design and Planning – concerned with the creation and/or improvement of the ICT solution Deployment – concerned with the implementation and rolling out of the business and/or ICT solution as designed and planned, with minimum disruption to the business processes Operations – concerned with the daily housekeeping and maintenance of the ICT infrastructure Technical Support – concerned with structuring and underpinning other processes to guarantee the services delivered by ICTIM.
  • 1.5 Structure and scope of the ICT book Figure 1.5 of the ICT book presents the main ICTIM processes described in detail in the following chapters of this book. The relationships to each other and with Service Management and Application Management are also shown. The main ICTIM processes as shown in Figure 1.5 are: Design and Planning – concerned with the creation and/or improvement of the ICT solution Deployment – concerned with the implementation and rolling out of the business and/or ICT solution as designed and planned, with minimum disruption to the business processes Operations – concerned with the daily housekeeping and maintenance of the ICT infrastructure Technical Support – concerned with structuring and underpinning other processes to guarantee the services delivered by ICTIM.
  • “ The most effective way of managing all aspects of services through their lifecycle is by using the Service Portfolio.” Important Concept: A Service Portfolio describes a provider’s services in terms of business value. Helps clarify the following strategic questions: Why should a customer buy these services? Why should they buy these services from you? What are the pricing or chargeback models? What are my strengths and weaknesses, priorities and risks? How should my resources and capabilities be allocated? NEW: Service Knowledge Management System (SKMS) – something that the service portfolio should form part of. Important Concept – Ownership of the Service Portfolio: Owned and Managed by Service Strategy within the Service Portfolio Management Process Designed by Service Design Further narrative covers the content of a Service Portfolio and the positioning of the Requirements Portfolio as a subset.
  • © 2007 Pink Elephant Inc. All rights reserved. Service level management vs. service management The 2 are integrated. Animation on the slide is Plan – Do – Check – ACT. This is the Deming cycle, which is further described in Annex D of the Service Delivery book. NOTE: Appendix D is mentioned as a resource reference in the Optimizing section of the IPAD Service Document.
  • © 2007 Pink Elephant Inc. All rights reserved.
  • © 2007 Pink Elephant Inc. All rights reserved.
  • © 2007 Pink Elephant Inc. All rights reserved. Discuss with the delegates why this particular order is so important, yet a lot of IT shops still cling to the old belief that an IT system is a service and that it supports a business process on a one-to-one basis.
  • © 2007 Pink Elephant Inc. All rights reserved. This slide is to illustrate the fact that it is very difficult in many cases to remove the IT component from the service provided to the external customer.
  • © 2007 Pink Elephant Inc. All rights reserved.
  • © 2007 Pink Elephant Inc. All rights reserved. This is a very good example of the use of a CFIA. The CFIA (component failure impact analysis is explained in more details in the availability management chapter in the service delivery book in section 8.9.1 On the left we have an example of a matrix where the different customers are mapped to the services they use On the right we have an example of a matrix where the components (CI) are mapped to the services they are part of. It is important to realize that an organization will have to create both matrices. Component Failure Impact Analysis During the 'design for Availability' activities it is necessary to predict and evaluate the impact on IT Service Availability arising from component failures within the proposed IT Infrastructure and service design. Component Failure Impact Analysis ( CFIA ) is a relatively simple technique that can be used to provide this information. IBM devised CFIA in the early 1970s with its origins based on hardware design and configuration. However, it is recommended that CFIA be used in a much wider context to reflect the full scope of the IT Infrastructure, i.e. hardware, network, software, application and Users. Additionally the technique can also be applied to identify impact and dependencies on IT support organization skills and competencies amongst staff supporting the new IT Service. This activity is often completed in conjunction with ITSCM . Benefits of CFIA The output from a CFIA provides vital information to ensure that the Availability and Recovery design criteria for the new IT Service is influenced to prevent or minimize the impact of failure to the business operation and User. CFIA achieves this by providing and indicating: single points of failure that can impact IT Availability the impact of component failure on the business operation and Users component and people dependencies component recovery timings the need to identify and document recovery options the need to identify and implement Risk reduction measures . The above can also provide the stimulus for input to ITSCM to consider the balance between recovery options and Risk reduction measures, i.e. where the potential business impact is high there is a need to concentrate on high Availability risk reduction measures, i.e. increased resilience or standby systems.
  • © 2007 Pink Elephant Inc. All rights reserved. This slide is using a similar concept to the one found in the incident management process. This is a sample only. Each organization will have to come up with their own scheme based on their own needs. However, practice has shown that this particular model does apply to many organization and is actually currently used by many organizations.
  • © 2007 Pink Elephant Inc. All rights reserved.
  • ITIL Configuration Management Practitioner © Pink Elephant Inc., 1998, version 3.0
  • ITIL Configuration Management Practitioner © Pink Elephant Inc., 1998, version 3.0
  • ITIL Configuration Management Practitioner © Pink Elephant Inc., 1998, version 3.0 There are four work streams: Service Catalog IT Function-wide Design Population with ITC Services Bundling of Services Service Level Targets 2. Process definition and design 3. Overlaying the cost model to ITC Services 4. Building Service Catalog in the new tool
  • © 2001 Pink Elephant Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Service Catalog an Essential tool for Business/IT Integration Pink Elephant Iberoamérica
    • 2. Lifecycle vs. Process Perspective
    • 3. Key Terms
    • 4. Key Terms
      • Service Portfolio
      • Service Catalogue
      • SLA’s
      • OLA’s
      • UC’s
      • Customer
      • User / End User
      • Business Processes
      • Service / IT Services
      • IT Systems
    • 5. Utility & Warranty © Crown copyright 2007 Reproduced under license from OGC. Figure 2.2 Service Support, page 17 Fit for Purpose ? Fit for Use ? Value Created AND AND OR Performance Supported ? Constraints Removed ? Available Enough ? Large Enough ? Continuous Enough ? Secure Enough ? Utility Warranty
    • 6. Business Perspective Of IT 1 IT Management Processes 4 Source: ITIL – The Business Perspective On Your IT Infrastructure; Understanding And Improving 3 2 Corp. Or Management Processes Primary Business Processes Business Support Processes Innovation, Development, Knowledge Transfer Processes Inputs, materials, data Products and Services IT Management Processes 1. Align IT Capabilities With Business Strategy 2. Plan IT Service Provision 3. Meet Customer Service Needs 4. Produce, Deliver & Support IT Services 5. Manage Underpinning Services & Products Suppliers IT Users Business Customers
    • 7. Service Portfolio / Service Catalogue
    • 8. Service Portfolio
      • Service Portfolio Management:
      • Process introduced in ITIL version 3
      • Service Portfolio:
      • Service Catalog Customer View
      • IT Services and IT Service Offerings aligned to a Customer / Business
      • Financial tool for a Customer to plan IT spending, forecasting demand, commitment and choices
    • 9. The Service Portfolio © Crown copyright 2007 Reproduced under license from OGC Figure 4.11 Service Strategy, page 74 Retired Services Third-party Catalog Service Operation Service Design Service Transition Continual Service Improvement Market Spaces Service Concepts Customers Common pool of resources Resources engaged Return on assets Earned from Service operation Resources Released Service Catalog Service Portfolio Service Pipeline Area of circle is proportional to resources currently engaged in the lifecycle
    • 10. Service Portfolio Management: Objectives
      • Service Portfolio Management is a dynamic method for governing investments in service management across the enterprise and managing them for value
      • Describes Service Provider services in terms of business value
      • Provides a means of comparing service competitiveness across alternate providers
      • Provides a framework for making service priority decisions
    • 11. Business Service & IT Service
      • © Crown copyright 2007 Reproduced under license from OGC Figure 5.11 Service Strategy, page 120
      • Process improvement with Six Sigma for C
      • Service management with ITIL for A and B
      • Enable
      • Embed
      • Loose coupling
      • Service Platform
      • Warranty
      • Availability
      • Continuity
      • Capacity
      • Security
      • IT Service
      • Logic
      • Management
      • People
      • Knowledge
      • IT Application / Infrastructure
      • Utility
      • Infrastructure
      • Applications
      • Information
      • Service Platform
      • Warranty
      • Availability
      • Continuity
      • Capacity
      • Security
      • Business Service
      • Business
      • Process
      • Utility
      • Workflow
      • Infrastructure
      • Applications
      • Information
      • Knowledge
      • People
      • Management
      • A
      • A
      • B
      • B
      • C
      • D
      • B
      • A
      • B
      • A
      • C
      • D
    • 12. Elements Of Service Portfolio & Service Catalog
      • © Crown copyright 2007 Reproduced under license from OGC Figure 4.12 Service Strategy, page 75
      • Service Portfolio
      • Description
      • Value proposition
      • Business cases
      • Priorities
      • Risks
      • Offerings and packages
      • Cost and pricing
      • Service Catalog(s)
      • Services
      • Supported products
      • Policies
      • Ordering and
      • request procedures
      • Support terms
      • and conditions
      • Entry points
      • and escalations
      • Pricing and
      • chargeback
    • 13. Service Catalogue
    • 14. SCM: Objectives & Scope
      • Objectives
      • To manage the information contained within the Service Catalog and to ensure that:
        • It is accurate
        • It reflects the current details, status, interfaces and dependencies of all services that are being run, or being prepared to run, in the operational environment
      • Scope
      • To provide and maintain accurate information on all services that are being transitioned or have been transitioned to the live environment
    • 15. Concept: The Service Model
      • Documents and describes how service assets interact with other service assets or business assets
      • Captures the structure and dynamics of the interaction required to deliver a service strategy to create value in a market space
      • Describes how outcomes will be achieved through the workings of the model including the underlying service asset utility and warranty
    • 16. Concept: Service Design Package
      • A Service Model should be used during the design stage for:
        • Each new service
        • Removal of a service
        • Major changes to a service
      • Service 1
      • Service 2
      • Service 4
      • Service 5
      • Service 3
      • Service 1
      • Hours of Operations
      • Monday – Friday
      • 09:00 – 17:00
      • ×
      • 2
      • 7
      • 4
    • 17. Of Service, Business & Technical Catalogs
      • © Crown copyright 2007 Reproduced under license from OGC Figure 4.3 Service Design, page 62
      • H/W
      • Service A
      • Resources
      • Services
      • Service B
      • Service C
      • S/W
      • DOC
      • ROLES
      • Business
      • Business
      • Process 3
      • Business
      • Process 2
      • Business
      • Process 1
      • Marketing
      • Business
      • Process 6
      • Business
      • Process 5
      • Business
      • Process 4
      • Sales
      • Business
      • Process 9
      • Business
      • Process 8
      • Business
      • Process 7
      • Finance
      The Business Service Catalog Containing details of all the IT services delivered to the customer, together with relationships to the business units and the business processes that rely on the IT services. This is the customer view of the Service Catalog.
    • 18. Of Service, Business & Technical Catalogs
      • © Crown copyright 2007 Reproduced under license from OGC Figure 4.3 Service Design, page 62
      • H/W
      • Service A
      • Resources
      • Services
      • Service B
      • Service C
      • S/W
      • DOC
      • ROLES
      • Business
      • Business
      • Process 3
      • Business
      • Process 2
      • Business
      • Process 1
      • Marketing
      • Business
      • Process 6
      • Business
      • Process 5
      • Business
      • Process 4
      • Sales
      • Business
      • Process 9
      • Business
      • Process 8
      • Business
      • Process 7
      • Finance
      The Technical Service Catalog Containing details of all the IT services delivered to the customer, together with relationships to the supporting services, shared services, components and CIs necessary to support the provision of the service to the business. This should underpin the Business Service Catalog and not form part of the customer view.
    • 19. SCM: Activities
      • Agreeing and documenting…
      • Interfacing with Service Portfolio Management…
      • Producing and maintaining…
      • Interfacing with the business…
      • Interfacing with support teams…
      • Interfacing with Business Relationship Management and Service Level Management…
      Agreeing and documenting a service definition with all relevant parties
      • Agreeing and documenting…
      • Interfacing with Service Portfolio Management…
      • Producing and maintaining…
      • Interfacing with the business…
      • Interfacing with support teams…
      • Interfacing with Business Relationship Management and Service Level Management…
      Interfacing with Service Portfolio Management to agree the contents of the Service Portfolio and Service Catalog Producing and maintaining a Service Catalog and its contents, in conjunction with the Service Portfolio Interfacing with the business and IT Service Continuity Management on the dependencies of business units and their business processes with the supporting IT services, contained within the Business Service Catalog Interfacing with support teams, suppliers and Configuration Management on interfaces and dependencies between IT services and the supporting services, components and CIs contained within the Technical Service Catalog Interfacing with Business Relationship Management and Service Level Management to ensure that the information is aligned to the business and business process
    • 20. SCM: Key Metrics, KPIs
      • The number of services recorded and managed within the Service Catalog as a percentage of those being delivered and transitioned in the live environment
      • The number of variances detected between the information contained within the Service Catalog and the ‘real-world’ situation
    • 21. SCM: Challenge
      • The major challenge facing the Service Catalog Management process is that of maintaining an accurate Service Catalog as part of a Service Portfolio, incorporating both the Business Service Catalog and the Technical Service Catalog as part of an overall Configuration Management System (CMS) and Service Knowledge Management System (SKMS).
    • 22. Designing Service Solutions
      • Based on OGC ITIL® material. Reproduced under license from OGC
      • H/W
      • Service A
      • Resources
      • Services
      • Service B
      • Service C
      • S/W
      • DOC
      • ROLES
      • Business
      • Business
      • Process 3
      • Business
      • Process 2
      • Business
      • Process 1
      • Marketing
      • Business
      • Process 6
      • Business
      • Process 5
      • Business
      • Process 4
      • Sales
      • Business
      • Process 9
      • Business
      • Process 8
      • Business
      • Process 7
      • Finance
      • Internal
      • Suppliers
      • External
      • Suppliers
      • Support Team 1
      • Support Team 2
      • Supplier 1
      • Supplier 2
      • OLA 1
      • OLA 2
      • Contract 1
      • Contract 2
      • Supporting Services
    • 23. Designing Service Management Systems & Tools
      • Key tool – Service Portfolio
      • Should contain details of all services and their status
      • Designed by Service Design, owned and managed by Service Strategy
      • Should be integrated with other tools such as SKMS and CMS
      • Service Pipeline
      • Requirements
      • a…
      • b…
      • c…
      • d…
      • Service Catalog
      • Based on OGC ITIL® material. Reproduced under license from OGC
      • H/W
      • Service A
      • Resources
      • Services
      • Service B
      • Service C
      • S/W
      • DOC
      • ROLES
      • Business
      • Business
      • Process 3
      • Business
      • Process 2
      • Business
      • Process 1
      • Marketing
      • Business
      • Process 6
      • Business
      • Process 5
      • Business
      • Process 4
      • Sales
      • Business
      • Process
      • Business
      • Process
      • Business
      • Process
      • Finance
    • 24. Service Management Model & Deming CHECK PLAN ACT DO PDCA Cycle Of Continuous Improvement Quality is a race without a finish line! David Kearns, Former CEO, Xerox Corp.
    • 25. It Is All About Building Relationships SLR OLA + UC Draft SLA Catálogo de Servicios Service Level Management Business Requirements Capabilities Negotiate SLA
    • 26. Advanced Integration Requirements Config. Object Model Budget & Client Bill Policies Processes Tools Reports Service Catalog
    • 27. Service Definition Process
      • Define major business processes
      • Define facilitating IT Services
      • Map IT Systems to IT Services
      • Map IT Components to IT Systems
      Communications Messeging Voice MS Exchange Lotus Notes Data / LAN WAN Business Process IT Services IT Systems
    • 28. Component Services Multiple IT and business services interact to deliver the product to the consumer!
    • 29. Object Model Example Service Service System Organization Software Document Document Document Server Enterprise Server Software Network Device (LAN) Configuration Mgmt Data Model with Attributes 1 of 2 System Organization Database
    • 30. Mapping Services To Customers Customer Service Matrix CI Service Matrix S1 S2 S3 S4 S5 S1 S2 S3 S4 S5 Services Services CI 1 CI 2 CI 3 CI 4 CI 5 X = service down A = service affected, alternative CI available B = service affected, backup CI available after service restoration Component Failure (Impact) Index Analysis X X X X X A X X X A A X X B B X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X
    • 31. Service Classification Impact Urgency Department/LOB/Branch/Group of VIPs (High) High High Critical Small Group of Users or VIP (Medium) Medium High Critical Single User (Low) Low Medium High Non-Urgent Services (Low) Support Services (Medium) Core Business Services (High)
    • 32. Service Catalog Characteristics
      • Identifies all the services offered
      • Is accessible by the customer
      • Is a non-technical document
      • Specifies the key features and default service levels
      • Documents default IT capabilities and targets
      • Details common terms of reference
      • Includes a glossary of terms
      • Includes template SLA structure and content
    • 33. Process Integration
      • SLA
      • Service
      • Catalog
      • Service Level
      • Management
      • UC
      • OLA
      • SLA
      • Service
      • Catalog
      • Integration of:
      • Request
      • Incident
      • Problem
      • Change
      • Availability
      • Service Level Management
      • Known
      • Error
      • Problem
      • Management
      • Change
      • Management
      • CMDB
      • Availability
      • Management
      • Incident
      • Management
      • Request
      • Fulfillment
    • 34. Service Reporting Model IM PM CHG CFG RDM AVM CAP ITSCM FIN SLM ERP Systems Hosting & Support Desktop Voice
      • Service Reports
      • Dashboard
      • Etc.
      Client
      • Service Level Manager
      Performance Analysts
    • 35. High Level Timeline – Example
      • Project Scoping
      • Validation of Service Catalog Structure , Data Collection & Bundling of Services
      • Measure / Define / Identify Service Level Targets
      • Catalog Structure
      • Design
      • Process Design, Templates for SLA, OLA & Reports
      • Overlay Cost Recovery Model
      • Tool Selection & Implementation
      • Build Catalog in the Tool
      • Training & Transitioning to Process Owner and User Groups
      • Service Catalog - Proof of Concept
      • SLM Project Overview
      2008 2009 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar
    • 36.
      • Pink Elephant - Expertos en Gestión de Servicios de TI
      • [email_address]
      • www.pinkelephant.com