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Soft.skills.for.sw.engineers
Soft.skills.for.sw.engineers
Soft.skills.for.sw.engineers
Soft.skills.for.sw.engineers
Soft.skills.for.sw.engineers
Soft.skills.for.sw.engineers
Soft.skills.for.sw.engineers
Soft.skills.for.sw.engineers
Soft.skills.for.sw.engineers
Soft.skills.for.sw.engineers
Soft.skills.for.sw.engineers
Soft.skills.for.sw.engineers
Soft.skills.for.sw.engineers
Soft.skills.for.sw.engineers
Soft.skills.for.sw.engineers
Soft.skills.for.sw.engineers
Soft.skills.for.sw.engineers
Soft.skills.for.sw.engineers
Soft.skills.for.sw.engineers
Soft.skills.for.sw.engineers
Soft.skills.for.sw.engineers
Soft.skills.for.sw.engineers
Soft.skills.for.sw.engineers
Soft.skills.for.sw.engineers
Soft.skills.for.sw.engineers
Soft.skills.for.sw.engineers
Soft.skills.for.sw.engineers
Soft.skills.for.sw.engineers
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Soft.skills.for.sw.engineers

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  • http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&rls=com.microsoft%3Aen-us%3AIE-SearchBox&rlz=1I7ADBR&q=Soft+Skills+for+a+Software+Engineer
  • http://www-128.ibm.com/developerworks/rational/library/sep06/pollice/index.html A typical software engineering course for my students focuses on giving them the skills to work effectively on a team, do iterative development, and deliver working software. 4 Many of these objectives and the outcomes I expect are quite soft . One of the first assignments I give the students in software engineering is to write a simple program, but to work in pairs (i.e., try pair-programming). As part of the assignment, they have to write a short paper describing their experience with the practice, whether they think it helps them develop better software or not, and defend their position. The work is not nearly as intellectually challenging as what they will face in the OOAD class, but it lays the groundwork for team collaboration, which is a major learning goal. How would you grade the assignment? Clearly, if the program doesn't work, there's a problem. But is the problem with the student's lack of technical knowledge or a problem with pair-programming? How much weight should I place on the code when the goal is to have them try a new practice and reflect upon it? I choose to place most of the emphasis for the grade on the report of their experiences with pair-programming. I look for clarity in their presentation and well-thought-out arguments and conclusions. There is no right answer as for whether pair-programming is good or bad, since it depends upon the individuals and the pair; but faulty logic or simply a bad argument is easier to spot, just as good arguments and sound reasoning are. The software engineering class has fewer assignments than the OOAD class. That's because the course-long project in the software engineering class is much bigger than any project they've encountered thus far in their academic careers. Teams usually consist of ten to fifteen students, so they spend a lot of time working on their collaboration skills. This collaboration is very hard for the type of student who is used to courses in the hard sciences. What about the "real world"? For most people who work outside of academia, the question of "grading" software developers in an organization is frequently relevant. If you're a manager, you want to reward good values and behaviors, but which ones? If you're a developer, do you have the ability to affect your team? If so, do you affect the team positively or negatively -- and from whose viewpoint? I submit that managers should think about evaluating their developers along the lines that we academics do in grading our students. I believe that many of the qualities we value in our students are the same that will help business organizations thrive. It seems obvious to me that there must be a bottom-line component to any evaluation. But there are tactical bottom-line victories that can lead to strategic defeats. Part of being a good manager is the ability to develop talent in your team that can lead to strategic, long-term success. You have to balance the short-term gains against the long-term competitive viability of the organization. Developing non-technical skills Quantifiable technical ability is a primary attribute that gets a person hired as a software developer. They bring needed skills to the organization and project. For many years, this was the only thing that mattered. Developers would go to a company, do great technical work, then find that they needed to move on -- usually because other members of their project team really didn't want to work with them on another project. But there were lots of companies who needed their technical expertise and were willing to pay for it. Job hoppers were the norm during those years. In the 1980s, we rarely encountered anyone who actually reached their five-year anniversary with a company. For the sake of full disclosure, I will admit that the '80s was for me, too, a time of frequent job changes. Part of it was working for companies that were in trouble, but mostly I was still trying to find my own path in software development. I wanted to learn, I wanted to do great work, but no one had ever mentored me on the non-technical skills that I now realize are so important. The choice was to be a journeyman developer or become a manager, and I've never wanted to be a manager -- at least not a manager who went for an MBA and had ambitions to be a captain of industry. Then I read Gerald Weinberg's book, Becoming a Technical Leader , which got me thinking differently about teams and teamwork and how I could better fit in and have a positive influence.5 But back to the point: If technical ability is the primary characteristic that gets someone the job, what keeps them on the job? For the strategic goals of the company and the longevity of the employee, the relationships among employee, company, and the people in the organization are important. Remember my grading analogy? I tell my students about the soft skills, and along with my teaching assistants, I help them learn something about them. It doesn't work for everyone. Some of my students are "fired" from their teams because they are unable to work on a team. These students don't pass the course. Others find talents they never thought they had and learn that delivering a product through collaboration can be an extremely rewarding experience. Valuing "soft" skills Do you evaluate your developers on their soft skills? How much emphasis do you put on them? For that matter, do you make it clear what you value? This last question is the key and the one I want to leave you with. I find that if I don't tell students exactly how they're going to be graded, some of them are surprised when they don't do well. They may think they've done commendable work, and technically speaking, they have often. But I want them to be part of a team, and if they're alienating their teammates, they're failing the lesson. If you take one thing away from this month's column, I hope it's the importance of clearly expressing what you value, whether it's for those who report to you or even for your peers. Companies, especially large ones, have huge human resource departments that provide corporate guidelines on how to perform performance evaluations. They provide training for managers, and much of it is really good. But they often miss the mark when it comes to defining the value of the soft skills. When annual reviews came around, back in my industry days, I was always frustrated, sometimes depressed. My wife couldn't understand it. I almost always got great reviews and a nice raise. My problem was that I was working as hard as I could, giving the company my best. I kept thinking "what more are they going to want from me now?" When companies asked me what stretch goals I was setting for the next year, I would picture myself as a rubber band, stretching more and more each year until one year, I would suddenly break. I'm sure this wasn't the intention, but that's how it felt. By contrast, simple communication of what the goals really meant, not to mention getting my buy-in, would have gone a long way to helping me understand how to better fit in with the corporate culture and contribute. Not all employee-company matches will work. There are many times when the goals, values, and needs just don't match. That's okay. Like software projects that are doomed to fail, it's better to find out sooner than later. But some of the failure can be avoided with a clear description of how you "grade" your software engineers. By clearly expressing what you expect from them, and by mentoring them along the way, you will find that you'll have more matches than mismatches. And taking a little time to improve your grading skills can yield employees that will want to work with you for a long time.
  • http://ia.rediff.com/getahead/2005/jun/30soft.htm "Soft skills are very important in business. It is essential to be technically sound, but one should also have the ability to convey the idea to the masses in the simplest possible manner," says Mayurkumar Gadewar, an ERP consultant with Pricewaterhouse Coopers. 6 soft skills for every hard-nosed professional Behavioural training experts say there are several soft skills are required in these circumstances. Some of them include: i . Interpersonal skills ii . Team spirit iii . Social grace iv . Business etiquette v . Negotiation skills vi . Behavioural traits such as attitude, motivation and time management Do you have these? If your answer is yes, good for you. But if your answer is no, then you know it is time to approach either a training organisation or a training consultant. Will formal training enhance your soft skills? There is a lot of argument in the industry as to whether it is possible to enhance soft skills in a few hours of training, especially when one considers the fact that a person has lived with those traits all his life. To this, the answer is harsh but real -- a professional who wants to do well in his/ her career does not really have a choice. In the initial years of your career, your technical abilities are important to get good assignments. However, when it comes to growing in an organisation, it is your personality that matters, more so in large organisations where several people with similar technical expertise will compete for a promotion. Training on soft skills becomes all the more relevant in a country like India where the education system does not delve into personality development. "Soft skills training is essential because we do not have it in our academic curricula. Therefore, corporate houses have to take up the task of grooming employees who are the link between the company and the external world, so that they are able to present themselves better, " says Sumeet Mehta, an equity research analyst with Fortis Securities Ltd. Be your own trainer! While organisations are definitely investing in augmenting their staff's people skills, here are some inputs for professionals and students who would like to initiate the process themselves: i . Be a part of team activities It could be   either as a part of your church choir, or an NGO, or your local youth circle. Observe your own behaviour in the group and how you relate to others. ii . Ask family members or close friends to write down your best and worst traits. Ideally, have at least four to five people do this for you. Evaluate the common traits all of them have mentioned. Thus, you can be aware of your strengths and work improving your weaknesses. iii . How well do you manage your time? Think. Can you do more in life? Or is your day too crammed with activities? Effective time management is very essential in the corporate world. iv . Introspect on how you react to feedback. In organisations, people skills mostly come into the picture when there is feedback given -- be it for an idea, an executed project or a presentation. You are judged by the way you respond to feedback. Do you get defensive? Do you insist you were right? Do you meekly accept criticism? Remember, people tend to be judged and stereotyped according to their responses. You will, too. v . How good are you at critiquing? While responding to feedback is one side of the coin, giving feedback is the other side. Are you aggressive? Pessimistic? Do you believe in constructive criticism? Or prefer to be the yes-man? vi . Live consciously Any organisation is manned by people, therefore soft skills are all about how you deal with people and present yourself. Though it may be easier said than done, soft skills can be enhanced simply by being aware of oneself and living consciously.
  • Like you learned brushing your teeth at childhood  …  … yes, … how many of you Brushed your teeth today ? ALL ?? … right !! exceptions ?? Oops … I hate dirty-teeth-ugly guys / gals …  …. 40-days continuous practice makes it a habit  …. Yes, remember … the Islamic ritual of 40-days … if you want to make something a habit .. PRACTICE IT RELIGIOUSLY for 40 days without any break …. Write ! Write !! Write !!! ….. Yes … Our STRONGEST Memory is WEAKER than the WEAKEST INK … !!! Use Hard-bound fat “ruler” Notebooks  ….. Yes … I have researched it for about 10 years … and yes, it WORKS !!!! Hear WIIFM Radio …  ….. Yes, we ALL get TURNED ON when we CLEARLY see “What’s In It For Me” … WIIFM .. We ALL love this ….FM Radio … so much …  …..
  • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Software_engineering In fact, according to the Association for Computing Machinery, "most people who now function in the U.S. as serious software engineers have degrees in computer science, not in software engineering". The discipline of software engineering includes knowledge, tools, and methods for software requirements , software design , software construction , software testing , and software maintenance tasks. [5] Software engineering is related to the disciplines of computer science , computer engineering , management , mathematics , project management , quality management , software ergonomics , and systems engineering . [6] Current trends in software engineering Software engineering is a young discipline, and is still developing. The directions in which software engineering is developing include: Aspects Aspects help software engineers deal with quality attributes by providing tools to add or remove boilerplate code from many areas in the source code . Aspects describe how all objects or functions should behave in particular circumstances. For example, aspects can add debugging , logging , or locking control into all objects of particular types. Researchers are currently working to understand how to use aspects to design general-purpose code. Related concepts include generative programming and templates . Agile Agile software development guides software development projects that evolve rapidly with changing expectations and competitive markets. Proponents of this method believe that heavy, document-driven processes (like TickIT , CMM and ISO 9000 ) are fading in importance[ citation needed ]. Some people believe that companies and agencies export many of the jobs that can be guided by heavy-weight processes[ citation needed ]. Related concepts include Extreme Programming and Lean software development . Experimental Experimental software engineering is a branch of software engineering interested in devising experiments on software, in collecting data from the experiments, and in devising laws and theories from this data. Proponents of this method advocate that the nature of software is such that we can advance the knowledge on software through experiments only[ citation needed ]. Model-driven Model Driven Design develops textual and graphical models as primary design artifacts. Development tools are available that use model transformation and code generation to generate well-organized code fragments that serve as a basis for producing complete applications. Software Product Lines Software Product Lines is a systematic way to produce families of software systems, instead of creating a succession of completely individual products. This method emphasizes extensive, systematic, formal code reuse , to try to industrialize the software development process. The Future of Software Engineering conference (FOSE), held at ICSE 2000, documented the state of the art of SE in 2000 and listed many problems to be solved over the next decade. The FOSE tracks at the ICSE 2000 and the ICSE 2007 conferences also help identify the state of the art in software engineering. [ edit ] Software engineering today The profession is trying to define its boundary and content. The Software Engineering Body of Knowledge SWEBOK has been tabled as an ISO standard during 2006 (ISO/IEC TR 19759). In 2006, Money Magazine and Salary.com rated software engineering as the best job in America in terms of growth, pay, stress levels, flexibility in hours and working environment, creativity, and how easy it is to enter and advance in the field. [43]
  • First we can quickly review the basics you will need to remember in order to participate in a Six Hat team thinking session.  First, there are six imaginary or metaphorical hats that can be worn - only one at a time. Relax…. no actual hats have to be used! This is a serious communication framework for serious issues and we don’t want to make its use seem trivial in any way.  Each hat is a different color, representing different types or modes of thinking.  Everyone on the team does the same type of thinking at the same time. That is, we all wear the same color hat.  When we change hats we change our thinking. The facilitator is an exception. The facilitator will always wear the control or facilitation hat (the blue hat), but he or she may also contribute in the content of the thinking if qualified and comfortable doing so. Although it may be uncomfortable at first, remember to use the hats and colors terminology. The artificiality of these symbols has proven to be a very powerful mental cue for producing a specific type of thinking at a specific time. Experience in many organizations has shown that in a very short time you will become unaware of the symbols themselves - the hats and colors. Instead you will key on the thinking being requested and automatically switch when necessary. 
  • Your responsibilities within your role as a participant include:  Following the lead of the facilitator.  Sticking to the hat in current use so that everyone is thinking in the same mode at the same time. This is the essence of parallel thinking. Remember exploration before decision.  Seeking to stay within the time limits that the leader has planned for each hat. Of course, he or she has the latitude to extend the times if necessary.  Finally, and perhaps most importantly, you should seek to contribute as completely and as honestly as possible in each thinking modes that is called for. Try to reserve your judgment until all exploration has been done. This is key to driving better exploration and better decisions. Now, with those basics in mind let’s do a quick practice session on a remote example before we try it out on one of our real issues. 
  • I choose to place most of the emphasis for the grade on the report of their experiences with pair-programming. I look for clarity in their presentation and well-thought-out arguments and conclusions.
  • A skill for dealing with people and society; The ability to fit into polite society and behave properly and with etiquette … http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/social_grace social grace ( plural social graces ) A skill for dealing with people and society. His lack of mastery of the social graces made it obvious he was not raised in fine society. The ability to fit into polite society and behave properly and with etiquette. His lack of social grace made him anathema at fine dining situations. Retrieved from "http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/social_grace"
  • http://www.cyborlink.com/besite/Default.asp Etiquette, manners, and cross cultural, or intercultural communication have become critical elements required for all International and Global Business executives, managers, and employees. As international, multinational, transnational, multi domestic, and global business continues to expand and bring people closer, the most important element of successful business outcomes may be the appreciation and respect for regional, country, and cultural differences - known as cultural diversity. Learning the skills of proper etiquette , manners, and intercultural communication contained in these pages of the International Business Etiquette and Manners website will give you a wealth of information and resources that you can immediately apply during your international business travels and overseas assignments. In fact, you may want to print a copy to review during your next international flight. Each Country's page on this Site has the following format: Introduction   Brief description of the country's population, cultural heritage, language, and religion. Fun Facts   Special or unique notes, thoughts, or comments about the country Analysis   Having insight into the cultural dynamics of a country or region can be very helpful to understand why people act the way they do, and the appropriate way you should act while in that country. To assist with this understanding, each country page contains a Geert Hofstede Analysis. Geert Hofstede developed a model that identifies four primary dimensions to differentiate cultures. Explanation of Geert Hofstede Dimensions Appearance   Highlights business etiquette do's and don'ts involving Dress, Clothing, Body Language, and Gestures. Behavior   Highlights business etiquette do's and don'ts involving Dining, Gift-giving, Meetings, Customs, Protocol, Negotiation, and General behavioral guidelines. Communication   Highlights business etiquette do's and don'ts involving Greetings, Introductions, and Conversational guidelines.
  • http://www.bizhelp24.com/employment-and-personal-development/negotiation-skills-5.html Negotiation Skills   Introduction Negotiation is something that we do all the time and is not only used for business purposes. For example, we use it in our social lives perhaps for deciding a time to meet, or where to go on a rainy day.   Negotiation is usually considered as a compromise to settle an argument or issue to benefit ourselves as much as possible.   Communication is always the link that will be used to negotiate the issue/argument whether it is face-to-face, on the telephone or in writing. Remember, negotiation is not always between two people: it can involve several members from two parties.   There are many reasons why you may want to negotiate and there are several ways to approach it. The following is a few things that you may want to consider. http://www.mindtools.com/CommSkll/NegotiationSkills.htm Win-Win Negotiation Finding a fair compromise Do you feel that someone is continually taking advantage of you? Do you seem to have to fight your corner aggressively, or ally with others, to win the resources you need? Or do you struggle to get what you want from people whose help you need, but over whom you have little direct authority? If so, you may need to brush up your win-win negotiation skills. Effective negotiation helps you to resolve situations where what you want conflicts with what someone else wants. The aim of win-win negotiation is to find a solution that is acceptable to both parties, and leaves both parties feeling that they've won, in some way, after the event. There are different styles of negotiation, depending on circumstances. Where you do not expect to deal with people ever again and you do not need their goodwill, then it may be appropriate to "play hardball", seeking to win a negotiation while the other person loses out. Many people go through this when they buy or sell a house – this is why house-buying can be such a confrontational and unpleasant experience. Similarly, where there is a great deal at stake in a negotiation, then it may be appropriate to prepare in detail and legitimate "gamesmanship" to gain advantage. Anyone who has been involved with large sales negotiations will be familiar with this. Neither of these approaches is usually much good for resolving disputes with people with whom you have an ongoing relationship: If one person plays hardball, then this disadvantages the other person – this may, quite fairly, lead to reprisal later. Similarly, using tricks and manipulation during a negotiation can undermine trust and damage teamwork. While a manipulative person may not get caught out if negotiation is infrequent, this is not the case when people work together routinely. Here, honesty and openness are almost always the best policies. Preparing for a successful negotiation… Depending on the scale of the disagreement, some preparation may be appropriate for conducting a successful negotiation. For small disagreements, excessive preparation can be counter-productive because it takes time that is better used elsewhere. It can also be seen as manipulative because, just as it strengthens your position, it can weaken the other person’s. However, if you need to resolve a major disagreement, then make sure you prepare thoroughly. Using our free worksheet, think through the following points before you start negotiating: Goals: what do you want to get out of the negotiation? What do you think the other person wants? Trades: What do you and the other person have that you can trade? What do you each have that the other wants? What are you each comfortable giving away? Alternatives: if you don’t reach agreement with the other person, what alternatives do you have? Are these good or bad? How much does it matter if you do not reach agreement? Does failure to reach an agreement cut you out of future opportunities? And what alternatives might the other person have? Relationships: what is the history of the relationship? Could or should this history impact the negotiation? Will there be any hidden issues that may influence the negotiation? How will you handle these? Expected outcomes: what outcome will people be expecting from this negotiation? What has the outcome been in the past, and what precedents have been set? The consequences: what are the consequences for you of winning or losing this negotiation? What are the consequences for the other person? Power: who has what power in the relationship? Who controls resources? Who stands to lose the most if agreement isn’t reached? What power does the other person have to deliver what you hope for? Possible solutions: based on all of the considerations, what possible compromises might there be? Style is critical… For a negotiation to be 'win-win', both parties should feel positive about the negotiation once it's over. This helps people keep good working relationships afterwards. This governs the style of the negotiation – histrionics and displays of emotion are clearly inappropriate because they undermine the rational basis of the negotiation and because they bring a manipulative aspect to them. Despite this, emotion can be an important subject of discussion because people's emotional needs must fairly be met. If emotion is not discussed where it needs to be, then the agreement reached can be unsatisfactory and temporary. Be as detached as possible when discussing your own emotions – perhaps discuss them as if they belong to someone else. Negotiating successfully… The negotiation itself is a careful exploration of your position and the other person’s position, with the goal of finding a mutually acceptable compromise that gives you both as much of what you want as possible. People's positions are rarely as fundamentally opposed as they may initially appear - the other person may have very different goals from the ones you expect! In an ideal situation, you will find that the other person wants what you are prepared to trade, and that you are prepared to give what the other person wants. If this is not the case and one person must give way, then it is fair for this person to try to negotiate some form of compensation for doing so – the scale of this compensation will often depend on the many of the factors we discussed above. Ultimately, both sides should feel comfortable with the final solution if the agreement is to be considered win-win. Only consider win-lose negotiation if you don't need to have an ongoing relationship with the other party as, having lost, they are unlikely to want to work with you again. Equally, you should expect that if they need to fulfill some part of a deal in which you have "won," they may be uncooperative and legalistic about the way they do this.
  • http://www.flyingsolo.com.au/p248847391_Nine-tips-for-improving-negotiation-skills.html Nine tips for improving negotiation skills Professional salespeople love negotiation, but many soloists are more comfortable doing their job rather than negotiating about it. Here are nine tips for improving your negotiation skills. As a proposal strategist and writer, my job is to get my clients shortlisted with the opportunity to negotiate for an important project or contract. During many hours spent burning the midnight oil together, clients become friends, and I usually end up caring about the outcome almost as much as they do. By keeping tabs on the progress of some very long post-pitch negotiations and seeing the tactics employed by some exceptional salespeople, I have picked up some great tips for improving negotiation skills that will help you navigate this important, but nerve-wracking, part of the sales process. 1. Remember you're the expert Buyers often have to buy products or services they don't really understand. Think of negotiation as education. 2. Negotiation is a two-way street Negotiation is a process of give and take. When you give a concession to the buyer, always ask for something in return. 3. Hold firm to your principles Don't forget you have something the buyer wants; they need you as much as you need them. When something is important to you, stick to your guns. Buyers will respect you for it. 4. Know when to walk away If the deal is unacceptable, cut your losses early. I've heard horror stories from fellow soloists and my own clients who have taken loss-making contracts hoping to make up the margin along the way. This rarely happens and the lingering ill-feeling is bad for everyone. 5. Don't be intimidated You do not need to automatically accept the contract terms a buyer offers you. Remember, it's their job to get the best possible outcome for their company. That's your job too. Be particularly wary of unfairly punitive contract clauses, such as late fees or liquidated damages. 6. Keep your ear to the ground Always stay alert for clues that may tell you where you are placed on the shortlist. It's a good sign if the buyer promptly returns your calls, keeps promised meeting times and gets back to you when they say they will. 7. Stay consistent If you had professional assistance with writing your pitch, consider ongoing help to draft negotiation correspondence too. 8. Don't celebrate until the contract is signed The negotiation process has many twists and turns and what looks good today might not look so good tomorrow. 9. Respect the process In a formal tender, buyers and sellers are bound by probity rules to ensure a fair outcome for both parties. If a buyer or their employees unwittingly let confidential information slip, it could jeopardise everyone's chances. If tendering is part of your business development strategy, keep it clean. By following these tips for improving your negotiation skills, you will have a better chance of winning that important deal!
  • http://www.businessballs.com/herzberg.htm herzberg's main theory and its significance Herzberg was the first to show that satisfaction and dissatisfaction at work nearly always arose from different factors, and were not simply opposing reactions to the same factors, as had always previously been (and still now by the unenlightened) believed. In 1959 Herzberg wrote the following useful little phrase, which helps explain this fundamental part of his theory, i.e., that the factors which motivate people at work are different to and not simply the opposite of the factors which cause dissatisfaction: "We can expand ... by stating that the job satisfiers deal with the factors involved in doing the job , whereas the job dissatisfiers deal with the factors which define the job context ." For graphical presentation of this principle, see the Herzberg hygiene factors and motivators graph diagram (revised April 2008), and the Herzberg diagram rocket and launch pad analogy diagram, (both are pdf files). Herzberg's research proved that people will strive to achieve 'hygiene' needs because they they are unhappy without them, but once satisfied the effect soon wears off - satisfaction is temporary. Then as now, poorly managed organisations fail to understand that people are not 'motivated' by addressing 'hygiene' needs. People are only truly motivated by enabling them to reach for and satisfy the factors that Herzberg identified as real motivators, such as achievement, advancement, development, etc., which represent a far deeper level of meaning and fulfilment. Examples of Herzberg's 'hygiene' needs (or maintenance factors) in the workplace are: policy relationship with supervisor work conditions salary company car status security relationship with subordinates personal life Herzberg's research identified that true motivators were other completely different factors, notably: achievement recognition work itself responsibility advancement N.B. Herzberg identified a specific category within the study responses which he called 'possibility of growth'. This arose in relatively few cases within the study and was not considered a major factor by Herzberg. Where referring to 'growth' or 'personal growth' in terms of Herzberg's primary motivators, 'growth' should be seen as an aspect of advancement, and not confused with the different matter of 'possibility of growth'. to what extent is money a motivator? This question commonly arises when considering Herzberg's research and theories, so it's appropriate to include it here. Herzberg addressed money particularly (referring specifically to 'salary' in his study and analysis). Herzberg acknowledged the complexity of the salary issue (money, earnings, etc), and concluded that money is not a motivator in the way that the primary motivators are, such as achievement and recognition. Herzberg said about 'salary': "It [salary] appears as frequently in the high sequences ['sequences' refers to events causing high or low attitude feelings recalled by interviewees in the study] as it does in the low sequences... however... we find that in the lows [events leading to dissatisfaction], salary is found almost three times as often in the long-range as in the short-range attitude changes..." (There was no such bias towards the more important long-range feelings in the high attitude events.) And about the interrelation of salary and other factors: "...when salary occurred as a factor in the lows (causes of dissatisfaction) it revolved around the unfairness of the wage system within the company... It was the system of salary administration that was being described... [or] it concerned an advancement that was not accompanied by a salary increase... In contrast to this, salary was mentioned in the high stories (events causing satisfaction) as something that went along with a person's achievement on the job. It was a form of recognition; it meant more than money; it meant a job well done; it meant that the individual was progressing in his work..." And Herzberg concluded about salary (i.e., money, earnings, etc): "Viewed within the context of the sequences of events, salary as a factor belongs more in the group that defines the job situation and is primarily a dissatisfier." Many people argue nevertheless that money is a primary motivator. For most people money is not a motivator - despite what they might think and say. For all people there are bigger more sustaining motivators than money. Surveys and research studies repeatedly show that other factors motivate more than money. Examples appear in the newspapers and in other information resources every week. For instance, a survey by Development Dimensions International published in the UK Times newspaper in 2004 interviewed 1,000 staff from companies employing more than 500 workers, and found many to be bored, lacking commitment and looking for a new job. Pay actually came fifth in the reasons people gave for leaving their jobs. The main reasons were lack of stimulus jobs and no opportunity for advancement - classic Herzberg motivators - 43% left for better promotion chances, 28% for more challenging work; 23% for a more exciting place to work; and 21% and more varied work. Lots of other evidence is found in life, wherever you care to look. Consider what happens when people win big lottery prize winners. While many of course give up their 'daily grind' jobs, some do not. They wisely recognise that their work is part of their purpose and life-balance. Others who give up their jobs do so to buy or start and run their own businesses. They are pursuing their dream to achieve something special for them, whatever that might be. And whatever it means to them, the motivation is not to make money, otherwise why don't they just keep hold of what they've got? Why risk it on a project that will involve lots of effort and personal commitment? Of course the reason they invest in a new business venture is that pursuing this sort of plan is where the real motivators are found - achievement, responsibility, advancement, etc - not money. The people who are always the most unhappy are those who focus on spending their money. The lottery prize-winners who give up work and pursue material and lifestyle pleasures soon find that life becomes empty and meaningless. Money, and spending it, are not enough to sustain the human spirit. We exist for more. Money is certainly important, and a personal driver, if you lack enough for a decent civilized existence, or you are striving for a house or a holiday, but beyond this, money is not for the vast majority of people a sustainable motivator in itself.
  • Be your own trainer! While organisations are definitely investing in augmenting their staff's people skills, here are some inputs for professionals and students who would like to initiate the process themselves: i . Be a part of team activities It could be   either as a part of your church choir, or an NGO, or your local youth circle. Observe your own behaviour in the group and how you relate to others. ii . Ask family members or close friends to write down your best and worst traits. Ideally, have at least four to five people do this for you. Evaluate the common traits all of them have mentioned. Thus, you can be aware of your strengths and work improving your weaknesses. iii . How well do you manage your time? Think. Can you do more in life? Or is your day too crammed with activities? Effective time management is very essential in the corporate world. iv . Introspect on how you react to feedback. In organisations, people skills mostly come into the picture when there is feedback given -- be it for an idea, an executed project or a presentation. You are judged by the way you respond to feedback. Do you get defensive? Do you insist you were right? Do you meekly accept criticism? Remember, people tend to be judged and stereotyped according to their responses. You will, too. v . How good are you at critiquing? While responding to feedback is one side of the coin, giving feedback is the other side. Are you aggressive? Pessimistic? Do you believe in constructive criticism? Or prefer to be the yes-man? vi . Live consciously Any organisation is manned by people, therefore soft skills are all about how you deal with people and present yourself. Though it may be easier said than done, soft skills can be enhanced simply by being aware of oneself and living consciously.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Soft SkillsSoft Skills for SW Engineersfor SW Engineers Fokhruz ZamanFokhruz Zaman Sep 03, 2008Sep 03, 2008
    • 2. 03.sep.08 fz.compile.soft.s 2 Why learn soft skills ?Why learn soft skills ?  Google Search Engine foundGoogle Search Engine found 189,000 matches for “189,000 matches for “SoftSoft SkillsSkills for afor a SoftwareSoftware EngineerEngineer””  Employers often get biasedEmployers often get biased towards “Attitude” rather thantowards “Attitude” rather than “Aptitude”“Aptitude”  SW Engg is essentially “SOFT”SW Engg is essentially “SOFT” 
    • 3. 03.sep.08 fz.compile.soft.s 3 Soft TopicsSoft Topics  TEAM Collaboration SkillsTEAM Collaboration Skills  Thinking SkillsThinking Skills  Creative Skills (6 THT)Creative Skills (6 THT)  Time Management SkillsTime Management Skills  Meeting Management SkillsMeeting Management Skills  Write Everything !Write Everything !  Communication SkillsCommunication Skills  Interpersonal SkillsInterpersonal Skills  Self-Reflection / IntrospectionSelf-Reflection / Introspection
    • 4. 03.sep.08 fz.compile.soft.s 4 6 soft skills for every hard-6 soft skills for every hard- nosed professionalnosed professional 1.1. Interpersonal skillsInterpersonal skills 2.2. Team SpiritTeam Spirit 3.3. Social GraceSocial Grace 4.4. Business EtiquetteBusiness Etiquette 5.5. Negotiation SkillsNegotiation Skills 6.6. Behavioral Traits, such as:Behavioral Traits, such as: 1.1. Attitude,Attitude, 2.2. Motivation, andMotivation, and 3.3. Time managementTime management
    • 5. 03.sep.08 fz.compile.soft.s 5 Soft skills “hard-wired” ?Soft skills “hard-wired” ?  Like you learned brushing yourLike you learned brushing your teeth at childhoodteeth at childhood ……  40-days continuous practice40-days continuous practice makes it a habitmakes it a habit   Write ! Write !! Write !!!Write ! Write !! Write !!!  Use Hard-bound fat “ruler”Use Hard-bound fat “ruler” NotebooksNotebooks   Hear WIIFM Radio …Hear WIIFM Radio … 
    • 6. 03.sep.08 fz.compile.soft.s 6 Presenter IntroPresenter Intro  Born in 1965, Bangladesh.Born in 1965, Bangladesh.  Working in the Global Software Development IndustryWorking in the Global Software Development Industry since late 1988.since late 1988.  20012001–Present Millennium Information Solution–Present Millennium Information Solution DhakaDhaka  CTO & Co-FounderCTO & Co-Founder  19991999, Sep, Sep–2001–2001 Horizon SoftwareHorizon Software DhakaDhaka  CTO & Co-FounderCTO & Co-Founder  1997–July,991997–July,99 Bell Atlantic (Nynex) S&T AsiaBell Atlantic (Nynex) S&T Asia BangkokBangkok  Manager, Software & NetworkManager, Software & Network  1995–97 Experty Technical Equipment Co.1995–97 Experty Technical Equipment Co. BangkokBangkok  R&D ManagerR&D Manager  1993–94 International Centre for Population1993–94 International Centre for Population DhakaDhaka  Software Developer & Network AdministratorSoftware Developer & Network Administrator  1988–92 Machine Dialogue1988–92 Machine Dialogue DhakaDhaka  Software Developer & ManagerSoftware Developer & Manager
    • 7. 03.sep.08 fz.compile.soft.s 7 Software ? SW Engg ??Software ? SW Engg ??  SoftwareSoftware  A Thought ProductA Thought Product  A TEAM SportA TEAM Sport  SW EnggSW Engg (partial view)(partial view)  The V-ModelThe V-Model  TDD – the philosophyTDD – the philosophy
    • 8. 03.sep.08 fz.compile.soft.s 8 TEAM Collaboration SkillsTEAM Collaboration Skills  TEAM :TEAM :  TogetherTogether  EveryoneEveryone  AchievesAchieves  MoreMore  ““Lone Super-Hero” days are goneLone Super-Hero” days are gone  With proper TEAM-spirit, andWith proper TEAM-spirit, and discipline; ordinary individuals candiscipline; ordinary individuals can make extra-ordinary TEAMsmake extra-ordinary TEAMs  Pair Programming …Pair Programming …
    • 9. 03.sep.08 fz.compile.soft.s 9 Thinking SkillsThinking Skills  The 6 Thinking HatsThe 6 Thinking Hats  WhiteWhite  RedRed  YellowYellow  BlackBlack  GreenGreen  BlueBlue
    • 10. 03.sep.08 10 Thinking Skills: Benefits Of The Six Thinking Hat Framework Parallel Saves Time Improves Creativity & Innovation Adversarial Fosters Collaborative Thinking
    • 11. 03.sep.08 11 Thinking Skills: The Originator Dr. Edward de Bono • M.D., Ph.D., (philosophy, medicine & psychology), Rhodes scholar • World-renowned consultant to business, governments, schools and industry • Author of 62 books in 40 languages • Originator of Six Thinking Hats, Lateral Thinking and Direct Attention Thinking Tools
    • 12. 03.sep.08 12 Thinking Skills: 6 THT: The Basics • There are six different imaginary hats that you can put on or take off. • Think of the “hats” as thinking icons. • Each hat is a different color and represents a different type or mode of thinking. • We all wear the same hat (do the same type of thinking) at the same time. • When we change hats - we change our thinking.
    • 13. 03.sep.08 13 Blue HatBlue Hat Managing The Thinking Setting The Focus Making Summaries Overviews • Conclusions Action Plans Green HatGreen Hat Creative Thinking Possibilities • Alternatives New Ideas • New Concepts Overcome Black Hat Problems & Reinforce Yellow Hat Values Black HatBlack Hat Why It May Not Work Cautions • Dangers Problems • Faults Logical Reasons Must Be Given Yellow HatYellow Hat Why It May Work Values & Benefits (Both Known & Potential) The Good In It Logical Reasons Must Be Given Red HatRed Hat Feelings & Intuition Emotions Or Hunches “At This Point” No Reasons or Justification Keep It Short White HatWhite Hat Information & Data Neutral & Objective Checked & Believed Facts Missing Information & Where To Source It FOCUSFOCUS
    • 14. 03.sep.08 14 White HatWhite Hat Information & Data Neutral & Objective Checked & Believed Facts Missing Information & Where To Source It Red HatRed Hat Feelings & Intuition Emotions Or Hunches “At This Point” No Reasons or Justification Keep It Short Black HatBlack Hat Why It May Not Work Cautions • Dangers Problems • Faults Logical Reasons Must Be Given Yellow HatYellow Hat Why It May Work Values & Benefits (Both Known & Potential) The Good In It Logical Reasons Must Be Given Green HatGreen Hat Creative Thinking Possibilities • Alternatives New Ideas • New Concepts Overcome Black Hat Problems & Reinforce Yellow Hat Values Blue HatBlue Hat Managing The Thinking Setting The Focus Making Summaries Overviews • Conclusions Action Plans FOCUSFOCUS
    • 15. 03.sep.08 15 Thinking Skills: Facilitator’s Role • Define the focus of your thinking • Plan the sequence and timing of the thinking • Ask for changes in the thinking if needed • Handle requests from the group for changes in the thinking • Form periodic or final summaries of the thinking for consideration by the team x
    • 16. 03.sep.08 16 Thinking Skills: Participant’s Role • Follow the lead of trained Six Thinking Hats facilitator • Stick to the hat (type of thinking) that is in current use • Try to work within the time limits • Contribute honestly & fully under each of the hats
    • 17. 03.sep.08 fz.compile.soft.s 17 Time Management SkillsTime Management Skills  Meeting Management SkillsMeeting Management Skills  Write Everything !Write Everything ! 1.1. Plan in the Morning – 15 minsPlan in the Morning – 15 mins 2.2. Make a Laundry List of TasksMake a Laundry List of Tasks 3.3. Set a Time Range for each TaskSet a Time Range for each Task 4.4. Set Task Priority LevelsSet Task Priority Levels 5.5. Review Plan in the Evening – 15Review Plan in the Evening – 15 minsmins
    • 18. 03.sep.08 fz.compile.soft.s 18 Time Management SkillsTime Management Skills SlSl Task DescriptionTask Description TimeTime PriorityPriority 11 Check MailsCheck Mails 9:00 AM9:00 AM to 9:30to 9:30 AMAM TopTop
    • 19. 03.sep.08 fz.compile.soft.s 19 Communication SkillsCommunication Skills  Interpersonal SkillsInterpersonal Skills  Self-Reflection / IntrospectionSelf-Reflection / Introspection  Pair Programming .. ?Pair Programming .. ?  Clarity in Presenting …Clarity in Presenting …  Well-thought-out argumentsWell-thought-out arguments  Conclusions …Conclusions …
    • 20. 03.sep.08 fz.compile.soft.s 20 Social GraceSocial Grace  Friendly ?Friendly ?  Handsome or Beautiful ??Handsome or Beautiful ??  Well-groomed ?Well-groomed ?  Soft-spoken ?Soft-spoken ?  A skill for dealing with people and society;A skill for dealing with people and society; The ability to fit into polite society andThe ability to fit into polite society and behave properly and with etiquettebehave properly and with etiquette
    • 21. 03.sep.08 fz.compile.soft.s 21 Business EtiquetteBusiness Etiquette  Learning the skills of properLearning the skills of proper etiquette….etiquette….  Manners …Manners …  Intercultural communication …Intercultural communication …  Respect Others…Respect Others…  YVP .. NOT .. IVP …YVP .. NOT .. IVP …
    • 22. 03.sep.08 fz.compile.soft.s 22 Negotiation Skills - 1Negotiation Skills - 1  Goals:Goals: what do you want to get out of the negotiation? What do youwhat do you want to get out of the negotiation? What do you think the other person wants?think the other person wants?  Trades:Trades: What do you and the other person have that you can trade?What do you and the other person have that you can trade? What do you each have that the other wants? What are you eachWhat do you each have that the other wants? What are you each comfortable giving away?comfortable giving away?  Alternatives:Alternatives: if you don’t reach agreement with the other person, whatif you don’t reach agreement with the other person, what alternatives do you have? Are these good or bad? How much does italternatives do you have? Are these good or bad? How much does it matter if you do not reach agreement? Does failure to reach anmatter if you do not reach agreement? Does failure to reach an agreement cut you out of future opportunities? And what alternativesagreement cut you out of future opportunities? And what alternatives might the other person have?might the other person have?  Relationships:Relationships: what is the history of the relationship? Could or shouldwhat is the history of the relationship? Could or should this history impact the negotiation? Will there be any hidden issuesthis history impact the negotiation? Will there be any hidden issues that may influence the negotiation? How will you handle these?that may influence the negotiation? How will you handle these?  Expected outcomes:Expected outcomes: what outcome will people be expecting from thiswhat outcome will people be expecting from this negotiation? What has the outcome been in the past, and whatnegotiation? What has the outcome been in the past, and what precedents have been set?precedents have been set?  The consequences:The consequences: what are the consequences for you of winning orwhat are the consequences for you of winning or losing this negotiation? What are the consequences for the otherlosing this negotiation? What are the consequences for the other person?person?  Power:Power: who has what power in the relationship? Who controlswho has what power in the relationship? Who controls resources? Who stands to lose the most if agreement isn’t reached?resources? Who stands to lose the most if agreement isn’t reached? What power does the other person have to deliver what you hope for?What power does the other person have to deliver what you hope for?  Possible solutions:Possible solutions: based on all of the considerations, what possiblebased on all of the considerations, what possible compromises might there be?compromises might there be?
    • 23. 03.sep.08 fz.compile.soft.s 23 Negotiation Skills – 9 TipsNegotiation Skills – 9 Tips 1.1. Remember you're the expertRemember you're the expert 2.2. Negotiation is a two-way streetNegotiation is a two-way street 3.3. Hold firm to your principlesHold firm to your principles 4.4. Know when to walk awayKnow when to walk away 5.5. Don't be intimidatedDon't be intimidated 6.6. Keep your ear to the groundKeep your ear to the ground 7.7. Stay consistentStay consistent 8.8. Don't celebrate until the contractDon't celebrate until the contract is signedis signed 9.9. Respect the processRespect the process
    • 24. 03.sep.08 fz.compile.soft.s 24 Behavioral TraitsBehavioral Traits  Attitude,Attitude,  Motivation, andMotivation, and  Time managementTime management
    • 25. 03.sep.08 fz.compile.soft.s
    • 26. 03.sep.08 fz.compile.soft.s 26 Be your own trainer !Be your own trainer !  Be a part of TEAM activitiesBe a part of TEAM activities  Get your SWOT from close PeersGet your SWOT from close Peers  Manage yourself to manage yourManage yourself to manage your TIME !TIME !  Introspect on how you react toIntrospect on how you react to feedbackfeedback  How good are you at critiquing ?How good are you at critiquing ?  Live consciouslyLive consciously
    • 27. 03.sep.08 27 Software Development LifeCycle (SDLC) Avg projects spend 10% effort on req gathering and modeling. Successful projects spend 28%. - Detailed SRS - Use case modeling - Screen UI mockups Requirements keep coming throughout the lifecycle and have to be managed. - Project contract - Acceptance criteria Must decide baseline architecture Test-driven development Establish the business case for the software. - Target audience - What problem it will solve - How it will solve it – high level Test planning, execution and defect correction. - Test cases - Test against expected results - Bug tracking software - Test automation Software configuration management - Version control - Release management One study found that 54% of all the errors were discovered after unit testing was complete, and that 45% of these were requirements or design errors.
    • 28. 03.sep.08 fz.compile.soft.s 28 References /References / AcknowledgementsAcknowledgements  Six Thinking HatsSix Thinking Hats®® A Framework For Parallel Thinking In TeamsA Framework For Parallel Thinking In Teams Resources UnlimitedResources Unlimited 800.278.1292 or 515.278.1292800.278.1292 or 515.278.1292 info@ResourcesUnlimited.cominfo@ResourcesUnlimited.com www.ResourcesUnlimited.comwww.ResourcesUnlimited.com  InternetInternet  http://www-128.ibm.com/developerworks/rational/library/sep06/pollice/index.html  http://ia.rediff.com/getahead/2005/jun/30soft.htm  And other references .. URLS …

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