Hrd in ict_for_db_industry_20.mar.2009_v1.5

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Human Resources Development for the ITS and ITES Industries ... Presentation given at BCC on the request of JICA on the 20th March, 2009 ...

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  • BANGLADESH ICT INDUSTRY: STATUS UPDATE (http://www.softexpo.com.bd/) ======================================================================================================== Bangladesh ICT industry has come a long way in last several decades. Particularly, in recent years ICT in Bangladesh has been experiencing an exponential growth and making its presence strongly felt both in the public & private sectors in the country. Some of the recent developments that are driving the industry are: Increasing availability of computers and Internet connections (current number of PC users is over 5 million and Internet users over 3 million). The newly installed SEA-ME-WE-4 submarine connectivity (10 GBPS) has provided the software and IT Service industry high-speed data and voice connectivity with the rest of the world. Rapid expansion of telecommunication & data network across the country. During last two years, more than 10 million new telephone connections have been subscribed. The total telephone connection is projected to increase from the current 15 million to 30 million by 2007. Most parts of the country are now connected with high-speed fiber-optic or microwave connectivity. A large number of good quality software application development houses -- more than 500 companies with over 50,000 knowledge workers and technical resources. The export of Software and ICT services are experiencing high growth in recent years. During the last 5 years, the average yearly export growth has been around 60% including more than 90% growth in last year. Over 100 software and IT Service companies are exporting different software products and ICT services to clients from USA, Japan, Denmark, Netherlands, UK, Australia, South Africa, Middle-East and ASEAN countries. Foreign Investment in the Software and IT Service industry in recent years has been on the rise. During last couple of years, at least 20 joint ventures or fully owned foreign ODC (off-shore development centers) have started operation. The domestic ICT market, currently estimated to be at around BDT 11 billion (USD 16 million), is also experiencing high growth and expected to reach BDT 30 billion (USD 43 million) by 2008. The growth will be mainly driven by large-scale e-Governance projects, banking solutions, e-Commerce integration, telecommunication applications, etc. Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) of knowledge assets of software and ICT companies are strongly protected by the law of the country. The ICT Act (Cyber Law) is in place. The government has declared favorable policy for the ICT industry which has created friendly and competitive environment for the investors. Government also has a national ICT policy of allocation 2% of ADP (Annual Development Program) for ICT procurement every year. A High Tech Park (over 200 acres of land space) with world-class facility is being constructed to host international and local ICT companies. More than 5,000 ICT students are graduating from around 300 international standard Universities & ICT Training Institutes every year making a strong HR pool to serve the growth of ICT industry. European Union has recently identified Bangladesh as one of the top 20 ICT outsourcing countries for EU market.
  • Knowledge economy programme – new report published Tuesday, 11 March 2008 Stephen Overell The Work Foundation today publishes a report outlining its research thus far into the knowledge economy, 18 months into a three-year, £1.5 million research programme which will conclude in April 2009. The Knowledge Economy: How Knowledge is Reshaping the Economic Life of Nations argues that the phenomenon of the knowledge economy is driven by the demand for higher value-added goods and services created by more sophisticated, more discerning and better educated consumers and businesses. These pressures have interacted with both technology and globalisation, accelerating the process of change and enabling new and disruptive patterns of supplying consumers. The report covers: Work: knowledge-based industries and knowledge-related occupations have provided most of the new jobs over the past decade* Trade : The UK has emerged as a world leader in trade in knowledge services with the biggest trade surplus of the major OECD economies. While the City of London and financial services remain important, two thirds of this trade comes from business services, high tech, and education and cultural services. <br> <br>Innovation: innovation in the knowledge economy comes from both the successful exploitation of R&D undertaken in the UK and overseas and from wider forms of innovation — design and development, marketing and organisational change. Small firms : Provisional findings show that in the decade between 1995 and 2005, small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs) have become much more concentrated in ‘knowledge intensive sectors’ - high skill, high tech sectors, such as accountancy, legal and consultancy services, architectural, engineering and technical services, and advertising. They have increased the numbers of people they employ by 17 per cent or 445,000 people. Offshore Outsourcing: Thus far, offshoring has had no measureable impact on knowledge economy jobs. Occupations theoretically at risk from offshore outsourcing continue to add numbers overall in the UK. Meanwhile, the trade in knowledge services remains overwhelmingly with richer countries, rather than developing nations such as India. The report was launched at The Work Foundation’s major conference on the knowledge economy held in central London on 6 March 2008. The Building the British Knowledge Economy conference featured presentations from John Hutton and John Denham, secretaries of state for business, and for universities and innovation respectively, and from Peter Mandelson, the European external trade commissioner. Ian Brinkley, director of The Work Foundation’s knowledge economy research programme, and author of the report, said: ‘You can see the knowledge economy in the industries that flourish most today and in the kinds of jobs that more people do, but perhaps most of all in the ways that organisations today search for competitive advantage. Value is extracted from intangible things such as ideas, R&D, software, design and marketing, human and organisational capital, in a way that was not the case in previous eras. No one can point to it, but it is becoming more real in advanced nations as the 21st century unfolds. ‘ In the time that remains in the programme, we shall be teasing out what the knowledge economy means practically for organisations and for the kinds of work that individuals do.’ Say … the “Urea fertilizer spray” a very indigenous innovation from a farmer of our soil …
  • Knowledge economy programme – new report published Tuesday, 11 March 2008 Stephen Overell The Work Foundation today publishes a report outlining its research thus far into the knowledge economy, 18 months into a three-year, £1.5 million research programme which will conclude in April 2009. The Knowledge Economy: How Knowledge is Reshaping the Economic Life of Nations argues that the phenomenon of the knowledge economy is driven by the demand for higher value-added goods and services created by more sophisticated, more discerning and better educated consumers and businesses. These pressures have interacted with both technology and globalisation, accelerating the process of change and enabling new and disruptive patterns of supplying consumers. The report covers: Work: knowledge-based industries and knowledge-related occupations have provided most of the new jobs over the past decade* Trade : The UK has emerged as a world leader in trade in knowledge services with the biggest trade surplus of the major OECD economies. While the City of London and financial services remain important, two thirds of this trade comes from business services, high tech, and education and cultural services. <br> <br>Innovation: innovation in the knowledge economy comes from both the successful exploitation of R&D undertaken in the UK and overseas and from wider forms of innovation — design and development, marketing and organisational change. Small firms : Provisional findings show that in the decade between 1995 and 2005, small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs) have become much more concentrated in ‘knowledge intensive sectors’ - high skill, high tech sectors, such as accountancy, legal and consultancy services, architectural, engineering and technical services, and advertising. They have increased the numbers of people they employ by 17 per cent or 445,000 people. Offshore Outsourcing: Thus far, offshoring has had no measureable impact on knowledge economy jobs. Occupations theoretically at risk from offshore outsourcing continue to add numbers overall in the UK. Meanwhile, the trade in knowledge services remains overwhelmingly with richer countries, rather than developing nations such as India. The report was launched at The Work Foundation’s major conference on the knowledge economy held in central London on 6 March 2008. The Building the British Knowledge Economy conference featured presentations from John Hutton and John Denham, secretaries of state for business, and for universities and innovation respectively, and from Peter Mandelson, the European external trade commissioner. Ian Brinkley, director of The Work Foundation’s knowledge economy research programme, and author of the report, said: ‘You can see the knowledge economy in the industries that flourish most today and in the kinds of jobs that more people do, but perhaps most of all in the ways that organisations today search for competitive advantage. Value is extracted from intangible things such as ideas, R&D, software, design and marketing, human and organisational capital, in a way that was not the case in previous eras. No one can point to it, but it is becoming more real in advanced nations as the 21st century unfolds. ‘ In the time that remains in the programme, we shall be teasing out what the knowledge economy means practically for organisations and for the kinds of work that individuals do.’ Say … the “Urea fertilizer spray” a very indigenous innovation from a farmer of our soil …
  • Hard Skills … very much measurable … can be certified .. Like in ITS … Oracle certified … Developer Level 5 .. PMP .. Etc … Soft Skills … quite difficult to objectively measure .. Say … TEAM Player … Disciplined .. Determined … etc …
  • Gaps are REAL … Blames are NOT All REAL …. … .. Reality IS both our Academia and Industry ARE very much RESOURCE – CONSTRAINED !!! …………………… We ALL are to be BLAMED ….. !!!!
  • Hard Skills … very much measurable … can be certified .. Like in ITS … Oracle certified … Developer Level 5 .. PMP .. Etc … Soft Skills … quite difficult to objectively measure .. Say … TEAM Player … Disciplined .. Determined … etc …
  • Hard Skills … very much measurable … can be certified .. Like in ITS … Oracle certified … Developer Level 5 .. PMP .. Etc … Soft Skills … quite difficult to objectively measure .. Say … TEAM Player … Disciplined .. Determined … etc …
  • Hard Skills … very much measurable … can be certified .. Like in ITS … Oracle certified … Developer Level 5 .. PMP .. Etc … Soft Skills … quite difficult to objectively measure .. Say … TEAM Player … Disciplined .. Determined … etc …
  • Hard Skills … very much measurable … can be certified .. Like in ITS … Oracle certified … Developer Level 5 .. PMP .. Etc … Soft Skills … quite difficult to objectively measure .. Say … TEAM Player … Disciplined .. Determined … etc …
  • Hard Skills … very much measurable … can be certified .. Like in ITS … Oracle certified … Developer Level 5 .. PMP .. Etc … Soft Skills … quite difficult to objectively measure .. Say … TEAM Player … Disciplined .. Determined … etc …
  • s
  • Hrd in ict_for_db_industry_20.mar.2009_v1.5

    1. 1. Digital Bangladesh How Can We build Industry Ready HR for IT? March 20, 2009 Fokhruz Zaman, BASIS
    2. 2. 20.March.2009 HRD in ICT for Digital Bangladesh2 EVOLUTION TODO List 1. Clearly Define HRD Targets in ICT for Digital Bangladesh 2. Work with Industry and Academia, stop the “blame game” 3. Focus on few priority ICT Sub-Sectors, like GDS, BPO, Mobile Apps, etc.. 4. Build employable ICT Professionals, Look beyond the ICT Graduates : Implement IPSAEP Successfully 5. Build competent ICT Technicians, Look below the “typical graduate professional line” : Revise the TVET with ICT 6. Stop “brain drain” : Keep highly-skilled experienced ICT Professionals, Bring NRB ICT talents back home 7. Build HRD Centers of Excellence in ICT
    3. 3. 20.March.2009 HRD in ICT for Digital Bangladesh3 EVOLUTION Topics • “Digital Bangladesh” as we “see” it ! • ICT Industry in Bangladesh • HRD – The Learning Model • The “Demand vs Supply” Gap Dilemma ! • HRD Initiatives in the ICT Industry • Way Forward
    4. 4. 20.March.2009 HRD in ICT for Digital Bangladesh4 EVOLUTION • PM’s ICT Task Force in 2000 • ICT declared as thrust sector in 2001 with MoSICT Ministry • ICT Policy 2002 • WSIS Declaration in 2005 • ICT Act 2006 • Right to Information Ordinance in 2008 • Revised ICT Policy 2008 • ‘Information Society/Knowledge economy’ talks/articles all along • ‘Digital Bangladesh’ promise in AL election manifesto Mostly rhetoric in the past ‘Important’ agenda buried under short-term urgencies Possible Evolution ?
    5. 5. 20.March.2009 HRD in ICT for Digital Bangladesh5 ICT Policy 2008 Vision • Expand and diversify the use of ICTs to establish a – transparent, responsive and accountable government; – develop skilled human resources; – enhance social equity; – ensure cost-effective delivery of citizen-services through public-private partnerships; – support the national goal of becoming a middle-income country within ten years and join the ranks of the developed countries of the world within thirty years.
    6. 6. 20.March.2009 HRD in ICT for Digital Bangladesh6 Objectives of ICT Policy Shared Vision Social Equity Support to ICTs IntegrityHealthcare Productivity Employment Creation Environment, Climate and Disaster Management Education & Research Strengthening Exports Universal Access Ensure social equity, gender parity, equal opportunity and equitable participation in nation-building through access to ICTs for all, including persons with disabilities and special needs Achieve higher productivity across all economic sectors including agriculture and small, medium and micro enterprises through the use of ICTs Achieve transparency, accountability, responsiveness and higher efficiency in the delivery of citizen-services Enlarge the pool of world-class ICT professionals to cater to the local and overseas employment opportunities Ensure a thriving software, ITES & IT development and manufacturing industry to meet domestic & global demands and thereby increase foreign exchange earnings, attract foreign direct investments and reduce dependence on imports Expand the reach and quality of education to all parts of the country and segments of the population using ICTs, ensure computer literacy at all levels of education & public service and facilitate creation of intellectual property & adoption of ICTs through appropriate R&D Ensure access for everyone Develop appropriate support infrastructure including power and regulatory framework for effective adoption and use of ICTs throughout the country Ensure quality healthcare to all citizens by innovative application of ICTs Promote environmental preservation by adopting environment-friendly green technologies, protect citizens from adverse nature through responsive disaster management technologies, and ensure safe disposal of toxic waste resulting from use of ICTs
    7. 7. 20.March.2009 HRD in ICT for Digital Bangladesh7 BD ICT Industry • Came a long way in last 20 years • 7 – 8 million PC Users, 4 – 5 million Internet Connection including mobile phones • 10 Gbps Submarine connectivity • 15,000+ SW Professionals in 400+ SW cos • BDT 30 Billion (approx) local ICT Industry • 20 International JVs / ODCs formed • ICT Services to USA, Japan, Denmark, Netherlands, UK, Australia, South Africa, Middle-East and ASEAN countries • USD 25 Million (approx) in Exports • EU listed BD among Top 20 ICT outsourcing countries • Annually 5,000+ ICT students from approx 200 Universities & Institutes
    8. 8. 20.March.2009 HRD in ICT for Digital Bangladesh8 Why ICT Industry for us ? • To leverage the abundant human capital and demographic advantage of BD • To reap “more VALUE for our effort” • To leapfrog to become middle-income country • To cope with the “global knowledge economy” • To solve our specific problems • To put our footprint globally
    9. 9. 20.March.2009 HRD in ICT for Digital Bangladesh9 ICT Industry Benefits • Higher monetary value for equal amount of effort – So better workers’ life than only RMG (US$ 200 vs US$30 per month) • Less competition – in the “global knowledge economy” than the “traditional manufacturing economy” • Fewer hassles – since more sophisticated, more discerning and better educated consumers and businesses than the traditional RMG sector
    10. 10. 20.March.2009 HRD in ICT for Digital Bangladesh10 HRD in ICT – How ? • What is Our Game Plan …? – To produce sufficient HRs to play … – In the selected Knowledge / ICT Industry segments • Where do we want to go in next … Years…? – Our Clear Vision – Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Relevant, Timely (SMART) Objectives
    11. 11. 20.March.2009 HRD in ICT for Digital Bangladesh11 HRD – Bloom’s Taxonomy – Cognitive Model Evaluation Synthesis Analysis Application Comprehension Knowledge
    12. 12. 20.March.2009 HRD in ICT for Digital Bangladesh12 Bloom’s Cognitive Verbs 1. Knowledge: Tell, List, Describe, Relate, Locate, Write, Find, State, Name 2. Comprehension: Explain, Interpret, Outline, Discuss, Distinguish, Predict, Restate, Translate, Compare, Describe 3. Application: Solve, Show, Use, Illustrate, Construct, Complete, Examine, Classify 4. Analysis: Analyze, Distinguish, Examine, Compare, Contrast, Investigate, Categorize, Identify, Explain, Separate 5. Synthesis: Create, Invent, Compose, Predict, Plan, Construct, Design, Imagine, Propose, Devise, Formulate 6. Evaluation: Judge, Select, Choose, Decide, Justify, Debate, Verify, Argue, Recommend, Assess, Discuss, Rate, Prioritize, Determine
    13. 13. 20.March.2009 HRD in ICT for Digital Bangladesh13 HR Skills Gap - 1 • “Hard Skills” Gap on specific Knowledge Areas: – Programming, Database / SQL, Graphic Design, English, Mathematics etc.. • “Soft Skills” Gap for: – Thinking / Communicating, – Discipline / Time management, and – TEAM Collaborations, etc…
    14. 14. 20.March.2009 HRD in ICT for Digital Bangladesh14 HR Skills Gap - 2 • First Two Levels : “Knowledge” and “Comprehension” – is a MUST from Academic Education – Which is often SADLY Missing … • 3rd & 4th Levels : “Application” & “Analysis” – Can be achieved with PROPER Academia + Industry Collaboration • 5th and 6th Levels: “Synthesis” & “Evaluation” – Intro from Academic Education – Achieved through Practice and Continuing Education
    15. 15. 20.March.2009 HRD in ICT for Digital Bangladesh15 HR Skills Gap – Myths & “Blame Game” • Our ICT Industry is “incompetent”…  – Doesn’t know how to handle fresh ICT Grads – Academia is teaching high level things which Industry can’t absorb – Escapes duties and Finds fun in blaming ICT Academia • Our ICT Academia is “arrogant”…  – “Can do anything” attitude; whereas no Industry experience – Industry is fighting for survival with ever changing global ICT with no academia support, because academia does not update courses – Escapes duties and Finds fun in blaming the ICT Industry • Our Government is not serious in HRD for ICT…  – ICT as a “Thrust Sector” .. Only rhetoric and some tax holiday … – Lacks SMART (Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Relevant, Timely) Objectives in HRD in both Industry and Academia
    16. 16. 20.March.2009 HRD in ICT for Digital Bangladesh16 HR Skills : Demand Side – 1 • Huge Global Demands • Rather the world is crying for talents in almost all Knowledge Industries… – Even in this gloomy economic global crisis …  • Local Demand is also on the rise … • Right skills set not easily found  …
    17. 17. 20.March.2009 HRD in ICT for Digital Bangladesh17 HR Skills : Demand Side – 2 • More than 15,000 SW professionals in 400 registered software companies • Avg HR growth in Software and ITS more than 30% annually • Biotech / Pharma; ITES; Financial Services’ HR growth are also in similar range • HR Supply side still not adequate to meet the demands
    18. 18. 20.March.2009 HRD in ICT for Digital Bangladesh18 HR Skills : Supply Side – 1 • Approx 5,000 ICT Graduates annually in BD • Approx 200,000 Graduates annually in BD • Approx 400,000 students pass HSC annually – Science enrollment below 20%  • Approx 900,000 students pass SSC annually • Quality of HR Supply – Very Weak in English, Math, and Concepts
    19. 19. 20.March.2009 HRD in ICT for Digital Bangladesh19 HR Skills – Supply Side – 2 • Knowledge Utilization : The Missing Link • Poor Educational Infrastructure • Inadequate Educational National Policy and Implementations • GIGO phenomenon in abundance – Very Weak in English, Math, and Concepts • 40% Poor population fails to continue in education – Physical Labor Opportunity cost not affordable 
    20. 20. 20.March.2009 HRD in ICT for Digital Bangladesh20 TVET Pyramid for ICT ? Professional Mid Mgr / Sub-Asst Engr Highly Skilled Worker / Supervisor Skilled Worker Semi Skilled Worker
    21. 21. 20.March.2009 HRD in ICT for Digital Bangladesh21 4 ICT Jobs for TVET • ILO and ICT Industry Reps brainstormed and suggested following 4 ICT Jobs for the TVET Program: – Graphic Designer – IT Support Technician – Web Designer – Testing Technician
    22. 22. 20.March.2009 HRD in ICT for Digital Bangladesh22 SE Tracks • 5 Software Engineering Tracks – Project Management – System Analysis – Software Design – SQA & Testing – Software Documentation
    23. 23. 20.March.2009 HRD in ICT for Digital Bangladesh23 Sample ICT Roles • Project Manager • System Analyst • Software Designer / Architect • Software Engineer / Developer / Programmer • SQA Engineer • Software Tester • Software Document Writer • Server / Security Expert, System Admin • Graphic Designer • Flash Expert • QA Manager • Web Developer • Desktop Publisher, etc ….
    24. 24. 20.March.2009 HRD in ICT for Digital Bangladesh24 HRD in Industry Typical Steps: 1. Company hires fresh ICT Grads 2. Attaches them with seniors 3. Holds orientation sessions 4. Gives small sample jobs 5. (optional) Sends to Technical Training (BCC, BASIS, BCS, ISPAB, etc…) 6. Seniors mentor the juniors on the Job 7. Company evaluates performance
    25. 25. 20.March.2009 HRD in ICT for Digital Bangladesh25 Why IPSAEP ? IPSAEP => ICT Professionals Skills Assessment and Enhancement Program  Create opportunities for the otherwise unemployable ICT and other competent graduates (both home & abroad)  Bring back confidence into the CSE / ICT courses in the Universities  Benchmark the ICT Industry HR Demands  Benchmark the local universities’ ICT graduates  Satisfy the Industry Demand
    26. 26. 20.March.2009 HRD in ICT for Digital Bangladesh26 IPSAEP Mission  Help our local ICT Industry to meet their growing needs for competent ICT Professionals  Improve the quality of prospective ICT Professionals for better career path  Be responsible to large pool of competent fresh graduates willing to become ICT Professionals, local ICT firms, local universities & colleges, and other relevant stakeholders  Prudent operations to become self-sustainable within 5 years  Committed to succeed to contribute to national economic growth
    27. 27. 20.March.2009 HRD in ICT for Digital Bangladesh27 IPSAEP Future  Be self-sufficient within 5 years of Operation  Assess, Train and place approx 2500 ICT & other competent graduates into job in first 2 years  Assess, Train and place approx 15,000 ICT Professionals in 5 years  A Globally Renowned Institute by 2015
    28. 28. 20.March.2009 HRD in ICT for Digital Bangladesh28 IPSAEP Core Values  Customer Delight -> Focus on the Customers’ ultimate delight, and all else will follow !!  Respect for Individuals -> One Individual can change the World !  Integrity everywhere -> Honest, Transparent, & Integral Business eventually wins!  Meritocracy in all Actions -> Only Merit prevails
    29. 29. 20.March.2009 HRD in ICT for Digital Bangladesh29 IPSAEP Overall Strategy  Build & Grow to a financially sustainable level within five years  Differentiate through High Quality Assessment and Enhancement Programs  Replicate success through the Universities / Institutes  Liaison with Global Training & Consulting Players after local success
    30. 30. 20.March.2009 HRD in ICT for Digital Bangladesh30 IPSAEP Objectives  To assess and train ICT Human Resources  To identify and categorize specialization in ICT Profession  To study Local and International Job market  To develop curriculum and content depending on job market requirement  To Conduct Test/Assessment  To conduct skill development program for professional enhancements  To ensure quality of need-based professionals
    31. 31. 20.March.2009 HRD in ICT for Digital Bangladesh31 IPSAEP Intakes  Academic Qualification: Minimum 16 Years Education 4-Years Bachelor Degree 3-Years Bachelor with honors + 1 Year Master Degree 2-Years Bachelor + 2-Years Master Degree  Target Group: Unemployed Graduates Employed Graduates
    32. 32. 20.March.2009 HRD in ICT for Digital Bangladesh 32
    33. 33. 20.March.2009 HRD in ICT for Digital Bangladesh 33
    34. 34. 20.March.2009 HRD in ICT for Digital Bangladesh34 • Exam grading system reform at SSC/HSC level for making ‘level playing field’ for Science students • Improve the quality of math and science teachers • Mandate Higher Mathematics for secondary science students • Introduce e-Learning to address the problem of dearth of teachers in Math and English Declining Science Students in SSC, HSC
    35. 35. 20.March.2009 HRD in ICT for Digital Bangladesh35 • Special Scholarship – Provide 100% govt. Scholarship / financial support in ICT Study for students getting CGPA 5 in both the secondary and higher secondary levels – Provide special scholarship for ICT education for 10 meritorious students from every Upazila • Provide long term Education Loan – with minimum 4 yr. grace period and maximum 4% interest rate for ICT and other Technical education Higher Education Affordability Issue
    36. 36. 20.March.2009 HRD in ICT for Digital Bangladesh36 • Establish at least one public University of Science and Technology in every district of the country. Industry should be tied up from the beginning to ensure relevance of curriculum and quality of teaching. • Introduce ICT undergraduate program at the district level colleges under National University (at least one college at every district). • Private Universities and Institutes should be encouraged for offering Science/IT programs (UGC guidance for certain percentage of Science/Technology students) Education & Training Institutes’ Capacity Issue
    37. 37. 20.March.2009 HRD in ICT for Digital Bangladesh37 • Periodic ranking of IT and other Science program of private and public universities by a competent body (including academia and industry) approved by UGC/MoED • Relevant Industry should be institutionally involved in curriculum development and supervision of quality/relevance of training of the graduates • Industry bodies should be supported by the Govt. for establishing training facility for making the fresh graduates ‘industry ready’. • Govt. should mandate the ICT / Knowledge Industry for continuous professional development for the knowledge workers Education & Training Quality and Relevance Issue
    38. 38. 20.March.2009 HRD in ICT for Digital Bangladesh38 • Encourage industry to collaborate with universities to carry out their mid to long term research activities. Adopt need based research projects with Industry, Academia and Govt. partnership • Provide incentives (financial, tax etc.) to industry to invest more in product development through R&D activities • Support Universities to link all the electronic libraries to the global hierarchical research networks (e.g. BDREN) R&D Issues
    39. 39. 20.March.2009 HRD in ICT for Digital Bangladesh39 Way Forward • Serious Resource mobilization around Digital Bangladesh strategy • Serious thoughts and actions in HRD for ICT Industry • Government, Academia and Industry MUST Work together to build Global Quality ICT HR for Common National Goals !!!
    40. 40. 20.March.2009 HRD in ICT for Digital Bangladesh40 EVOLUTION TODO List 1. Clearly Define HRD Targets in ICT for Digital Bangladesh 2. Work with Industry and Academia, stop the “blame game” 3. Focus on few priority ICT Sub-Sectors, like GDS, BPO, Mobile Apps, etc.. 4. Build employable ICT Professionals, Look beyond the ICT Graduates : Implement IPSAEP Successfully 5. Build competent ICT Technicians, Look below the “typical graduate professional line” : Revise the TVET with ICT 6. Stop “brain drain” : Keep highly-skilled experienced ICT Professionals, Bring NRB ICT talents back home 7. Build HRD Centers of Excellence in ICT
    41. 41. 20.March.2009 HRD in ICT for Digital Bangladesh41 Refs / Credits • Bangladesh ICT Policy 2008 (proposed) • BASIS Archive • ITC-led BD ITES Strategy Paper • Internet • Mr. Anir Chowdhury, Policy Advisor, A2I Program, PMO / UNDP
    42. 42. 20.March.2009 HRD in ICT for Digital Bangladesh42 THANK YOU VERY MUCH 

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