BUILDING EFFECTIVE INDUSTRY
LINKAGE FOR THE ICT EDUCATION
Fokhruz Zaman
23rd February, 2012
BASIS SoftExpo, 2012
• Why ICT Education?1
• Why Effective Industry Linkage?2
• What are our current challenges?3
• How can we harness the Indu...
ICT Education?
• Knowledge and skills
around computing and
communications devices,
• Software, that operates
them,
• Appli...
ICT Education
ICT / Digital
Literacy
ICT Infrastructure
& Support –
Applied
Technologists
Specialized Business
and Industr...
Time Spent
Why Effective Industry Linkage?
Time Spent
ProjectsWorkedOn
Start Small
and Simple
Achieve
Mastery
Working Toward Mastery
Get
Experienced
What are our current challenges?
--- From University Perspective
• Requests presented to universities (by SMEs) tend to
be...
What are our current challenges?
--- From SME Perspective
• It is difficult to obtain information on the collaborating
res...
Many barriers among Industry,
Academia and Government…
• Industry, by nature, tends to be fragmented. Industry liaison
gro...
Many barriers among Industry,
Academia and Government…
• Academia as represented through universities is
generally not fle...
Many barriers among Industry,
Academia and Government…
• Government is often too slow and inflexible to deal well
with aca...
How to harness…?
• Government funding is a great attraction to both
academics and industry associations.
• In reality, gov...
How to harness…?
• Importantly, academia provides a neutral environment to
bring diverse people together. Further, academi...
How to harness…?
• Industry is the engine that creates the tax base for
government revenues and provides the general
econo...
Next Steps…
• Let us define the ICT Education challenges
– Technological as well as cultural
• Let us set realistic expect...
Acknowledgments
• http://www.iiitd.edu.in/~jalote/GenArticles/IndAcadColla
b.pdf
• http://www.well.com/user/mb/docs/AICCol...
THANK YOU SO MUCH 
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  • Information and Communications Technologies (ICT) education is basically our society’s efforts to teach its current and emerging citizens valuable knowledge and skills around computing and communications devices, software that operates them, applications that run on them and systems that are built with them.What are these things? How do they work? How do you use them productively? How are they deployed, assembled, managed and maintained to create productive systems? How they are used in specific business and industry settings? What are the underlying science and technologies behind them and how might those be developed to advance ICT fields?ICT is complex and quickly changing, and it is confusing for many people. It is so pervasive in the modern world that everyone has some understanding of it, but those understandings are often wildly divergent.
  • The barriers are many in numberand difficult to address.• Industry, by nature, tends to be fragmented. Industry liaison groups mayhave only a lose hold at best on membership and likely have their ownobjectives and expectations that are not the same as those of thegovernment. Shifting membership, coupled with short-term unpaid boardmembers, tends to result in poor organizational memory and interest.Board members are also executives who work full time at other industrybasedpaid jobs and tend to get transferred or easily lose interest. Aperennial concern is difficulty in understanding academics.• Academia as represented through universities is generally not flexibleenough when dealing with collaborative projects and typically presentsadditional levels of bureaucracy and policies that stifle innovation.Further, academia does not lend itself to a good ICT developmentenvironment. The generally creative (though sometimes undisciplined)nature of the employees often results in their being good at prototyping butunable to delivery tested products. Ability to sustain products is alsodifficult as academics have a propensity to change direction.• Government is often too slow and inflexible to deal well with academicand industry collaboration as it is often not entrepreneurial by nature andbeset by monster bureaucracies. Tons of reporting requirements and littleICT domain knowledge further exacerbate collaboration. Personnel areoften not the best and brightest, funding delays are commonplace andexamples of overly controlling are legion. Expectations of RFPs (Requestfor Proposals) and/or RFQs (Request for Quotations) as well as lack ofvendor style interaction from academics inevitably lead to problems, notthe least of which include government
  • • Academia as represented through universities is generally not flexibleenough when dealing with collaborative projects and typically presentsadditional levels of bureaucracy and policies that stifle innovation.Further, academia does not lend itself to a good ICT developmentenvironment. The generally creative (though sometimes undisciplined)nature of the employees often results in their being good at prototyping butunable to delivery tested products. Ability to sustain products is alsodifficult as academics have a propensity to change direction.• Government is often too slow and inflexible to deal well with academicand industry collaboration as it is often not entrepreneurial by nature andbeset by monster bureaucracies. Tons of reporting requirements and littleICT domain knowledge further exacerbate collaboration. Personnel areoften not the best and brightest, funding delays are commonplace andexamples of overly controlling are legion. Expectations of RFPs (Requestfor Proposals) and/or RFQs (Request for Quotations) as well as lack ofvendor style interaction from academics inevitably lead to problems, notthe least of which include government
  • The barriers are many in numberand difficult to address.• Industry, by nature, tends to be fragmented. Industry liaison groups mayhave only a lose hold at best on membership and likely have their ownobjectives and expectations that are not the same as those of thegovernment. Shifting membership, coupled with short-term unpaid boardmembers, tends to result in poor organizational memory and interest.Board members are also executives who work full time at other industrybasedpaid jobs and tend to get transferred or easily lose interest. Aperennial concern is difficulty in understanding academics.• Academia as represented through universities is generally not flexibleenough when dealing with collaborative projects and typically presentsadditional levels of bureaucracy and policies that stifle innovation.Further, academia does not lend itself to a good ICT developmentenvironment. The generally creative (though sometimes undisciplined)nature of the employees often results in their being good at prototyping butunable to delivery tested products. Ability to sustain products is alsodifficult as academics have a propensity to change direction.• Government is often too slow and inflexible to deal well with academicand industry collaboration as it is often not entrepreneurial by nature andbeset by monster bureaucracies. Tons of reporting requirements and littleICT domain knowledge further exacerbate collaboration. Personnel areoften not the best and brightest, funding delays are commonplace andexamples of overly controlling are legion. Expectations of RFPs (Requestfor Proposals) and/or RFQs (Request for Quotations) as well as lack ofvendor style interaction from academics inevitably lead to problems, notthe least of which include government
  • Government funding is a great attraction to both academics and industryassociations. In reality, government is already paying for the academicsthrough university employment and support for facilities. In addition tohaving the money, governments further have the ability to track andaccount for funding and its application. Government is also in the positionof identifying more global societal needs and those with special strategicvalue, e.g., tourism. An important role for government lies in creating an“ether” within which disadvantaged groups can be nourished and benefitgiven accordingly. In general, government cuts across a broad swath ofindustries and is reasonably stable with fewer annual ups and downs thanoften occurs in business.• Academia in the contexts of universities clearly has the researchcapability and motivation, as well as experience, in delivering educationalbenefits through courses and workshops to large segments of apopulation. Importantly, academia provides a neutral environment to bringdiverse people together. Further, academia is able (and likes) to exploreconcepts that are too risky for business. Finally, there is plenty of cheapsmart labor available in academic settings as students seek to learn andgain experience. Ultimately, academia has a responsibility to interact withand support the community at large, i.e., in line with the origins of“service.”• Industry is the engine that creates the tax base for government revenuesand provides the general economic viability of a community, city and country. Industry is also the basis of the problems and opportunities forapplication that can be the focus of government and academiccollaborations. Small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs) are a specialaspect of industry that account for the vast majority of businesses aroundthe world. Unfortunately, SMEs typically do not have the scarce resources(either in people or money) necessary to explore concepts and removeuncertainties beyond day to day survival. As such, they are prime clientsfor government and academic collaboration.
  • Government funding is a great attraction to both academics and industryassociations. In reality, government is already paying for the academicsthrough university employment and support for facilities. In addition tohaving the money, governments further have the ability to track andaccount for funding and its application. Government is also in the positionof identifying more global societal needs and those with special strategicvalue, e.g., tourism. An important role for government lies in creating an“ether” within which disadvantaged groups can be nourished and benefitgiven accordingly. In general, government cuts across a broad swath ofindustries and is reasonably stable with fewer annual ups and downs thanoften occurs in business.• Academia in the contexts of universities clearly has the researchcapability and motivation, as well as experience, in delivering educationalbenefits through courses and workshops to large segments of apopulation. Importantly, academia provides a neutral environment to bringdiverse people together. Further, academia is able (and likes) to exploreconcepts that are too risky for business. Finally, there is plenty of cheapsmart labor available in academic settings as students seek to learn andgain experience. Ultimately, academia has a responsibility to interact withand support the community at large, i.e., in line with the origins of“service.”• Industry is the engine that creates the tax base for government revenuesand provides the general economic viability of a community, city and country. Industry is also the basis of the problems and opportunities forapplication that can be the focus of government and academiccollaborations. Small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs) are a specialaspect of industry that account for the vast majority of businesses aroundthe world. Unfortunately, SMEs typically do not have the scarce resources(either in people or money) necessary to explore concepts and removeuncertainties beyond day to day survival. As such, they are prime clientsfor government and academic collaboration.
  • Government funding is a great attraction to both academics and industryassociations. In reality, government is already paying for the academicsthrough university employment and support for facilities. In addition tohaving the money, governments further have the ability to track andaccount for funding and its application. Government is also in the positionof identifying more global societal needs and those with special strategicvalue, e.g., tourism. An important role for government lies in creating an“ether” within which disadvantaged groups can be nourished and benefitgiven accordingly. In general, government cuts across a broad swath ofindustries and is reasonably stable with fewer annual ups and downs thanoften occurs in business.• Academia in the contexts of universities clearly has the researchcapability and motivation, as well as experience, in delivering educationalbenefits through courses and workshops to large segments of apopulation. Importantly, academia provides a neutral environment to bringdiverse people together. Further, academia is able (and likes) to exploreconcepts that are too risky for business. Finally, there is plenty of cheapsmart labor available in academic settings as students seek to learn andgain experience. Ultimately, academia has a responsibility to interact withand support the community at large, i.e., in line with the origins of“service.”• Industry is the engine that creates the tax base for government revenuesand provides the general economic viability of a community, city and country. Industry is also the basis of the problems and opportunities forapplication that can be the focus of government and academiccollaborations. Small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs) are a specialaspect of industry that account for the vast majority of businesses aroundthe world. Unfortunately, SMEs typically do not have the scarce resources(either in people or money) necessary to explore concepts and removeuncertainties beyond day to day survival. As such, they are prime clientsfor government and academic collaboration.
  • Building effective industry_linkage_for_ict_education_fz_v0.5_feb_23_2012

    1. 1. BUILDING EFFECTIVE INDUSTRY LINKAGE FOR THE ICT EDUCATION Fokhruz Zaman 23rd February, 2012 BASIS SoftExpo, 2012
    2. 2. • Why ICT Education?1 • Why Effective Industry Linkage?2 • What are our current challenges?3 • How can we harness the Industry, Academia, and Government?4 • Next Steps...5 Today’s Overview
    3. 3. ICT Education? • Knowledge and skills around computing and communications devices, • Software, that operates them, • Applications that run on them and systems that are built with them
    4. 4. ICT Education ICT / Digital Literacy ICT Infrastructure & Support – Applied Technologists Specialized Business and Industry Uses of ICT ICT Research and Development Scientists On-the-Job Learning in the Industry
    5. 5. Time Spent Why Effective Industry Linkage?
    6. 6. Time Spent ProjectsWorkedOn Start Small and Simple Achieve Mastery Working Toward Mastery Get Experienced
    7. 7. What are our current challenges? --- From University Perspective • Requests presented to universities (by SMEs) tend to be vague • SMEs desire tangible results in a short period of time • SMEs display a low level of understanding with regard to the position of universities and academics • Independence is lacking in terms of business execution • SMEs are often not accustomed to the handling of contracts and intellectual property • Insufficient financing
    8. 8. What are our current challenges? --- From SME Perspective • It is difficult to obtain information on the collaborating researchers • There is a certain ambiguity regarding university organizational structure rules • The pace of R&D is slow • There is a difference in perspectives regarding the issue of R&D costs • Advice cannot be obtained in relation to putting things on a business footing • It is not possible to obtain information on subsidy programs
    9. 9. Many barriers among Industry, Academia and Government… • Industry, by nature, tends to be fragmented. Industry liaison groups may have only a lose hold at best on membership and likely have their own objectives and expectations that are not the same as those of the government. • Shifting membership, coupled with short-term unpaid board members, tends to result in poor organizational memory and interest. • Board members are also executives who work full time at other industry based paid jobs and tend to get transferred or easily lose interest. • A perennial concern is difficulty in understanding academics.
    10. 10. Many barriers among Industry, Academia and Government… • Academia as represented through universities is generally not flexible enough when dealing with collaborative projects and typically presents additional levels of bureaucracy and policies that stifle innovation. • Further, academia does not lend itself to a good ICT development environment. • The generally creative (though sometimes undisciplined) nature of the employees often results in their being good at prototyping but unable to delivery tested products. • Ability to sustain products is also difficult as academics have a propensity to change direction.
    11. 11. Many barriers among Industry, Academia and Government… • Government is often too slow and inflexible to deal well with academic and industry collaboration as it is often not entrepreneurial by nature and beset by monster bureaucracies. Tons of reporting requirements and little ICT domain knowledge further exacerbate collaboration. Personnel are often not the best and brightest, funding delays are commonplace and examples of overly controlling are legion.
    12. 12. How to harness…? • Government funding is a great attraction to both academics and industry associations. • In reality, government is already paying for the academics through university employment and support for facilities. • Academia in the contexts of universities clearly has the research capability and motivation, as well as experience, in delivering educational benefits through courses and workshops to large segments of a population.
    13. 13. How to harness…? • Importantly, academia provides a neutral environment to bring diverse people together. Further, academia is able (and likes) to explore concepts that are too risky for business. • Finally, there is plenty of cheap smart labor available in academic settings as students seek to learn and gain experience. • Ultimately, academia has a responsibility to interact with and support the community at large, i.e., in line with the origins of “service.”
    14. 14. How to harness…? • Industry is the engine that creates the tax base for government revenues and provides the general economic viability of a community, city and country. • Small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs) are a special aspect of industry that account for the vast majority of businesses around the world. • Unfortunately, SMEs typically do not have the scarce resources (either in people or money) necessary to explore concepts and remove uncertainties beyond day to day survival.
    15. 15. Next Steps… • Let us define the ICT Education challenges – Technological as well as cultural • Let us set realistic expectations – Mastery is not achieved overnight • Let us keep our eye on the goal – Mentorship programs – Appropriate ICT Education with F/OSS – Crowdsourcing and co-creation
    16. 16. Acknowledgments • http://www.iiitd.edu.in/~jalote/GenArticles/IndAcadColla b.pdf • http://www.well.com/user/mb/docs/AICCollaboration.pdf • http://www.nyas.org/publications/ebriefings/Detail.aspx? cid=a937b74a-a986-4bff-9633-9afd6d046e85 • http://web.mit.edu/ipc/publications/pdf/05-010.pdf • www.ncrr.nih.gov/research.../Collaboration_RCMI2006.pd f • http://kmap2005.vuw.ac.nz/papers/Govt,%20Academia,% 20Industry%20Collaboration.pdf • http://www.ai-blog.net/archives/000135.html • http://www.isbc2007.org/isbc/upload/4623.pdf
    17. 17. THANK YOU SO MUCH 

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